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My HS budget may be non-existent...


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We always make a big HS purchase in the spring when we get our tax refund.  The IRS made a mistake (I'm a conspiracy theorist at heart and think we were targeted. LOL) , and we may or may not get this thing resolved.  I'm not holding my breath. Even if it does get resolved, we probably won't see any of the $ for a long while.  That means I can't make my purchases now and plan this summer, being ready in the fall.

 

 

I have enough materials that I *could* make do with what I have this year, utilizing the library...and purchasing a few things out of our grocery budget over the summer.  However, if there were ANY year to splurge on some pre-made plans with pretty checklists, it is NOW!  Baby Girl will be well into the Terrible Two's, Oldest ds is dyslexic and needs MORE attention as he approaches the teen years, and the two in the middle need more - more content, more challenge, more independence, more, more, more.

 

I want video lessons, and computer generated drill.  I want reading schedules on a grid, all done for me.  I want narration prompts (with answers) all written in a beautiful workbook.  I want MATH that does BACKFLIPS on a TRAMPOLINE!!!

 

I can make my own pretty checklists.  BUT, I need the materials we are going to use FIRST.  I can write my own lessons, and maybe that would be best (y'all would miss me though :crying:  :lol: ), but I don't really want to. I can use public domain materials, and/or what I have on the shelves and hard drive...but it's more fun to think about how you CAN do those things when it's not needed than to face actually HAVING to DO those things.  jawm!!!

 

 

Now that you've jawm....kick my tail feathers into high gear and send me off to "shop" on my bookshelves and get to work.  

 

 

A list of only the best of the best free materials (grades 3-6) online would be appreciated. How you use Khan as a complete math curric would be much appreciated.  How you PRINT and use KISS...sigh...

 

 

 

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*Hugs* I've been there on the budget. I can't help with suggestions, but wanted to mention The Book Samaritan. This is EXACTLY what they are there for. They are a group out of Oklahoma that functions sorely to help homeschoolers in need. They take donated materials and send them to families worldwide.

 

I'd shop your shelves, see what you need and send them your wish list, with notes as to what is open to subbing out or options, and see how much you get. Give them your phone or email if you are comfy with that - then they can contact you about what they have to sub for what you wanted. You might get lucky. And if not, you are only out the cost of a stamp.

 

On the oldest with Dyslexia - if you are part of HSLDA you might try contacting their foundation. I know they do a special needs scholarship to cover materials geared towards that need.

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I hate to use Book Samaritan b/c others need it much more than I do.

Hmm, maybe but maybe not. That is what they are there for. Why not just ask for a few key things you need. When you are done with them and when your financial state is better, you can donate back to them. It would be a win win. I am actually about to donate a huge box to them within the next few days.

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The Crisis Plan for Language Arts doesn't fit your exact situation, but  at least it's not just a LONG and random list of links. I really tried to put together a PACKAGE of links that work TOGETHER.

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/508287-a-crisis-plan-for-language-arts-lots-and-lots-of-free-links/?p=5539450

 

I'm thinking about YOUR situation and will wait to say more until I have time to think. :grouphug:

 

I just want to encourage you that my BEST homeschooling times were when I had the least, and even sometimes when I had the least time to teach, and to interact outside the home. I got in a different frame of mind, where I put aside the expectation of others, and my own small voice became louder.

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Okay, I read through your post several times. I read your challenges, and then I read your list of hoped for responses to those challenges, and to be honest… :lol: if you are a woman of faith, maybe the money is being put on hold for a bit, until you are ready to choose differently.

 

When I am moving in a directing that is going to prove wrong in the future, I'm often smacked over the head with a crisis that stops me in my tracks.

 

Forgive me if I'm overstepping. But, reading your post, I'm not surprised the money is on hold. :lol: 

 

:grouphug: Don't hate me!

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Okay, I read through your post several times. I read your challenges, and then I read your list of hoped for responses to those challenges, and to be honest… :lol: if you are a woman of faith, maybe the money is being put on hold for a bit, until you are ready to choose differently.

 

When I am moving in a directing that is going to prove wrong in the future, I'm often smacked over the head with a crisis that stops me in my tracks.

 

Forgive me if I'm overstepping. But, reading your post, I'm not surprised the money is on hold. :lol:

 

:grouphug: Don't hate me!

Is that like saying you shouldn't pray for patience?

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Okay, I read through your post several times. I read your challenges, and then I read your list of hoped for responses to those challenges, and to be honest… :lol: if you are a woman of faith, maybe the money is being put on hold for a bit, until you are ready to choose differently.

 

When I am moving in a directing that is going to prove wrong in the future, I'm often smacked over the head with a crisis that stops me in my tracks.

 

Forgive me if I'm overstepping. But, reading your post, I'm not surprised the money is on hold. :lol:

 

:grouphug: Don't hate me!

`

 

 

Oh, I am cracking up! :lol:

 

 

Tell me what I'm supposed to choose!!!!

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Okay, lets start with content.

 

I have found that when I schedule content tightly, there is less wriggle room for the inevitable issues that arise with content. The crying and the outrage and the disagreements with the author. The boredom if a student HATES the book. Finding out the reading level of some of the books is WAY too high and squished into the schedule anyway because it matched the time period. And the less choice in content, the less the student learns and works; all sorts of passive aggressive stuff can start that is just NOT worth it for content.

 

The worst thing with a pretty content checklist, is that I start shirking the skills to finish the content. I want to check boxes above all else, for my own compulsive needs.

 

Math. I have found that the most math got done when it was bare bones and taught by buddy reading the books with the student. Reading the book counted as reading comprehension.

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I think you might just need more TIME to choose better. We all have moments when our environment and other people have crowded out our own small quiet voice. I have great faith in you. I think you have just hit a rough spot where it appears to me you are kind of taking pot shots. Slow down. Trust a bit. Trust your God. Trust yourself. Trust your children.

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We are a part of the conspiracy theory too ..... not fun at all... it has stressed me so much since last October.... then I thought we would lose everything for a few months.... it is agony....

I am a woman of Faith too and prayed daily to trust more in God and not let it take my peace. 

 

Good news for now is we just got our money last week.  It is not even half of our medical bills but we are paying off a home equity loan and some credit cards and some of the bills.

 

Still, I have a small job that helps a little and I am growing veggies earlier this year!  Good news is that dh's work is getting more contracts when they have lost so much... it is always difficult for him being the

director of a non-profit sheltered workshop.  And he is going through the fire now with some people who were fired.  Revenge is in their blood. 

 

You can sell some books to buy more ( I have to do this every year too)  and don't be afraid to ask specifically for what you need or want.  God already knows!  

Samaritan might help this year too if you need them.  I got help one tough as nails year too.  They understand we have hardships and many are out of our control. 

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

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Take a look at the Virtual Homeschool Group (www.virtualhomeschoolgroup.com) to see if there's something there you can use. There won't be a final list of any of the live classes until sometime in July when volunteers commit, but they also have at your own pace science and math classes that can be joined at any time. It's free  and will give you the computer-generated drill and video lessons with computer grading and open office hours if there's a problem. We used them this year for math, literature, a book club, and Spanish. I know they are going to have at your own pace courses for some of the lower level Saxon (5/4 and 6/5 should be available in early June, and they're planning to build Saxon 3 next year, so I believe you could use that as long as you stayed behind where they are in the build process). Their Facebook group is the best place to find out as early as possible what's coming.

 

Computer-generated drill for math facts---either xtramath.org or www.bigbrainz.com (TimezAttack). Both will do addition/subtraction/multiplication/division and are free (TimezAttack has a free version that covers all levels, the paid version just gives more variation in scenarios for the video game format).

 

If you have more specific information on the programs or types of programs you need, I may have some additional suggestions.

 

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I think you might just need more TIME to choose better. We all have moments when our environment and other people have crowded out our own small quiet voice. I have great faith in you. I think you have just hit a rough spot where it appears to me you are kind of taking pot shots. Slow down. Trust a bit. Trust your God. Trust yourself. Trust your children.

 

 

This is true.  

 

We are a part of the conspiracy theory too ..... not fun at all... it has stressed me so much since last October.... then I thought we would lose everything for a few months.... it is agony....

I am a woman of Faith too and prayed daily to trust more in God and not let it take my peace. 

 

Good news for now is we just got our money last week.  It is not even half of our medical bills but we are paying off a home equity loan and some credit cards and some of the bills.

 

Still, I have a small job that helps a little and I am growing veggies earlier this year!  Good news is that dh's work is getting more contracts when they have lost so much... it is always difficult for him being the

director of a non-profit sheltered workshop.  And he is going through the fire now with some people who were fired.  Revenge is in their blood. 

 

You can sell some books to buy more ( I have to do this every year too)  and don't be afraid to ask specifically for what you need or want.  God already knows!  

Samaritan might help this year too if you need them.  I got help one tough as nails year too.  They understand we have hardships and many are out of our control. 

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

 

A non-profit, eh.....yep.   :banghead:   (We are clergy.)  It's a bad year for being any sort of faith-based employee.

 

 

 

I'm thankful that dh has a good job and food/rent are not a worry.  I can squeeze a grocery budget to buy books.  I've had years when I didn't have that.  I have resources.  I have the ability to write every lesson from scratch if need be.  I just wanted an easy-button year, and it seems that is not to be.  I will choose to believe it's for the best, necessity is the mother of invention...and all that jazz.

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I'm not so sure that this year isn't going to be an easy year. The money may be coming, but just delayed. Or you may read a library book that inspires you to use a free method or cheap older curriculum that IS easy, and easier than the expensive ones.

 

Don't go from busy picking out expensive curricula to busy looking for similar free resources. I know it's hard, but slow down. If this has been pre-ordained, busy never fixes it. 

 

Okay, you are clergy. So you have beliefs. If I were you, I'd get a copy of the Good News Bible in Paperback and sit down and read through at least the gospels, with the kids, for literature. It really won't take that long. Print them out some coloring sheets and let them color while you read. I think it might settle you, and direct you, and they will be busy right there with you, while you do this for yourself.

 

And read Ecclesiastes.

 

And I'd read a little Ruth Beechick.

 

You might need some serious money and time consuming curricula to plow through quickly in the FUTURE, when it is an EXACT fit for a PRECISE GOAL, but right now, I think you need to slow down and wait for more direction. I'm not saying to definitely adopt a less rigorous philosophy in general, but rigorous and busy for the sake of rigorous and busy isn't what I think you need right now.

 

I am not at all getting the feeling that this is going to be a year of hard work and deprivation for you; not at all. I think instead you are being SAVED from something. Like your God is grabbing you by the shirt collar and saying, "Whoa!, where are you going?"

 

I see only good things for you this year.

 

Have you read the TWTM weekly library book selection list, lately?

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/509216-swb-library-book-list-recomendation-for-each-visit/

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You are a good friend, Hunter.  The weekly booklist is partly what drew me to HSing years ago.  So simple. So rich.

 

 

My plan for the rest of May is to enjoy spring and finish the rest of our current work.  And...read...kids' books, the old copy of TWTM, some CM.

 

June 1 I will decide what to do, and maybe the $ will be here.

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I don't know if you rememeber the day I spilled BBQ chicken drippings and tea on 7 of my books and on my iPad. By the end of the day, it was getting surreal, and my friends were getting spooked. I am just so used to this pattern in my life, that I just SLOWED way down, and waited to let myself get pushed in a direction. I looked at what I did have left, trying to see things with new eyes.

 

Not being able to turn my iPad on for days, and not having some of the books I had been planning to use, I was forcibly redirected. Today, if not happy about how that went, I'm accepting the new direction, and even interested in the new things I am learning and trying.

 

For me, in my life, I have learned that "resistence is futile".

 

And for trust in knowing I'll have what I need when I need it is coming. I have more now that I have ever had in my life, BUT there is no security in what I have and often little free choice and free will. I still have no food stamps, and so often I do not know where my next meal is coming from, but I eat so well. I've actually put on a pound instead of losing weight. The loss of my food stamps and income was unfair, but...part of a bigger plan I guess.

 

Book money is always there. Exactly what I need to purchase what I need at the time. Last time my booklist was growing, I was given a sizable Amazon gift card that a friend received as payment for doing medical research.

 

Like with the food stamps, when authority figures are being unfair, I have learned to pull back and remember the life of Joseph. It wasn't fair, but it's how it needed to happen to place him in the places he needed to be in, to serve his destiny.

 

Have you ever been stuck in a wave? I've learned that when the water is churning fast and throwing me, to curl in a ball and protect my head, and wait for things to slow down and to be thrown somewhere. Only then do I look for the surface and a place to put my feet.

 

I've seen some sad stories on this board about no money for curriculum, but yours just seems funny to me. Sorry! I don't think you are going to be overly busy and sad, just redirected.

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Hi Paula,

Maybe this will be a good year for "keeping it simple, mastering the basics?"  I agree with a lot of what Hunter said - relax, simplify, wait.  In your shoes, I would prioritize spending on math.  After that, nothing.  I know you have some CM leanings.... have you listened to Cindy Rollin's podcast on Circe about morning time?  She also has a series of blog posts - 31 days to morning time.  I think your kids are at a great age to do a lot with morning time.  Since we finished some of our normal school year work, I've been using ILL with mine during morning time and it's been great.  Again, since our normal work (except math) felt "done" to me, it has allowed me to really relax and linger over things, and that's bearing fruit in our discussions.  Our basic morning goes something like this:  singing a hymn, praying, reciting a Bible passage, reading a Bible story, reading/reciting a poem, a lesson from ILL, a lesson from GSWL, then we skip around with various other things - composer, artist, poetry, drawing, (one per day) a history read aloud, a literature read aloud - several different ones, but not all of them every day.  Some things we do quickly and move on, other things we stop and spend time with - as the mood hits.  Just last night my 10yo and 8yo told me they like the "new way" we are doing morning time.  My 12 yo usually joins us more than half the time (he had separate studies this last school year, so I didn't require him to start the day with us), and I am trying to woo him back in. 

 

Your biggest challenge will be your youngest.  Honestly, if the money comes through I would not spend it on curriculum or plans, I would set it aside and use it for a mommy's helper to come once a week (or more if you can afford it) to play with and read to the 2yo, freeing you up to work with your dyslexic.  If the 2yo makes morning time challenging - well you know all the tricks - save special quiet toys for her to have during morning time (little ponies, big legos, stuffed animals), or go to the kitchen and give her play-dough in the high chair - or a snack in the high chair - or a whole meal in the high chair, lol.  And don't be legalistic about it.... if morning time gets done 3 days out of 5, count it success!

 

Maybe you're going to have your best year yet!

 

 

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I think you might just need more TIME to choose better. We all have moments when our environment and other people have crowded out our own small quiet voice. I have great faith in you. I think you have just hit a rough spot where it appears to me you are kind of taking pot shots. Slow down. Trust a bit. Trust your God. Trust yourself. Trust your children.

 

:iagree:

 

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I have not used this, so I can't vouch for it (it was too young for my kids by the time I found it)....  But you may want to try EasyPeasy All-in-One Homeschool.  I can't get the link to paste, but it will come up in Google.  It looks pretty darn good....

 

 

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Have you ever been stuck in a wave? I've learned that when the water is churning fast and throwing me, to curl in a ball and protect my head, and wait for things to slow down and to be thrown somewhere. Only then do I look for the surface and a place to put my feet.

 

I've seen some sad stories on this board about no money for curriculum, but yours just seems funny to me. Sorry! I don't think you are going to be overly busy and sad, just redirected.

 

 

I know.  I have a wealth of resources around me...and I may be freaking out over just getting expected funds late instead of losing them...and even if we lose the $, it's not needed for basic life necessity.  

 

Oh, I've ridden lots of waves.  Hubby is in ministry!  (I can pm you some insanity, let my tell ya'! :lol: )  Part of my disappointment is that I'm always riding waves, rarely directing ship.  I had some good plans in my brain.

 

 

 

Hi Paula,

Maybe this will be a good year for "keeping it simple, mastering the basics?"  I agree with a lot of what Hunter said - relax, simplify, wait.  In your shoes, I would prioritize spending on math.  After that, nothing.  I know you have some CM leanings.... have you listened to Cindy Rollin's podcast on Circe about morning time?  She also has a series of blog posts - 31 days to morning time.  I think your kids are at a great age to do a lot with morning time.  Since we finished some of our normal school year work, I've been using ILL with mine during morning time and it's been great.  Again, since our normal work (except math) felt "done" to me, it has allowed me to really relax and linger over things, and that's bearing fruit in our discussions.  Our basic morning goes something like this:  singing a hymn, praying, reciting a Bible passage, reading a Bible story, reading/reciting a poem, a lesson from ILL, a lesson from GSWL, then we skip around with various other things - composer, artist, poetry, drawing, (one per day) a history read aloud, a literature read aloud - several different ones, but not all of them every day.  Some things we do quickly and move on, other things we stop and spend time with - as the mood hits.  Just last night my 10yo and 8yo told me they like the "new way" we are doing morning time.  My 12 yo usually joins us more than half the time (he had separate studies this last school year, so I didn't require him to start the day with us), and I am trying to woo him back in. 

 

Your biggest challenge will be your youngest.  Honestly, if the money comes through I would not spend it on curriculum or plans, I would set it aside and use it for a mommy's helper to come once a week (or more if you can afford it) to play with and read to the 2yo, freeing you up to work with your dyslexic.  If the 2yo makes morning time challenging - well you know all the tricks - save special quiet toys for her to have during morning time (little ponies, big legos, stuffed animals), or go to the kitchen and give her play-dough in the high chair - or a snack in the high chair - or a whole meal in the high chair, lol.  And don't be legalistic about it.... if morning time gets done 3 days out of 5, count it success!

 

Maybe you're going to have your best year yet!

 

 

Yes!  I love Cindy Rollins!  

 

I need to heed my siggie, true.

 

 

I have not used this, so I can't vouch for it (it was too young for my kids by the time I found it)....  But you may want to try EasyPeasy All-in-One Homeschool.  I can't get the link to paste, but it will come up in Google.  It looks pretty darn good....

 

 

I recently found easypeasy.  I don't think I could use it 100% as is, but it looks like something to fill the gap for ds7 & dd9 when I'm working w/my oldest.  Definitely!

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Another Lynne, the times I spend doing what we called Morning Worship were the most productive times for us. Many other subjects just flow after Bible, prayer and hymn singing, don't they? The language arts  and history and geography and science all just seem to happen by themselves. 

 

Math and extended Morning Worship/Time pretty much covers it all.

 

My oldest says that everything important that he used in college and now in adult life, he learned during Morning Worship. And that is saying a lot, coming from a man that always was, and remains an atheist.

 

My son married a Christian and was married in a church and promised the Pastor he would take his family to church and support the institution financially, as he is hoping the church can give his future children at least a tiny bit of what he got during Morning Worship time.

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Some of us just need to give up on directing the ship. We are lucky when we are even allowed to ride in a ship. I think the biggest part of the Bible I don't believe in is "free will".

 

I was NOT okay at the beginning with my oldest's curriculum. I mean NOT okay at ALL!!!!! But as time passed, WOW! What I fought SO hard may have just literally saved his life. If everything had not gone down as it did, my oldest wouldn't have been on the other side of the country and already financially independent when his dad imploded.

 

But back when he was 13 and 14, and I was FREAKING out over the lacks in his Latin and Algebra education, I could not have imagined the future and all it held.  It's a good thing I wasn't driving THAT ship!

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Can you sell something?

 

This year we're trying to save up to replace the roof/gutters/soffits/fascia and trim the tree in the backyard so while I have money, I don't. I sold a few things on Craig's List that my kids have outgrown or that we didn't need (who needs three lawn mowers, only one of which really works?) and bought what we need for at least the first half of next year. I'd even consider a garage sale or selling some of the books you don't need if you haven't already.

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I have not used this, so I can't vouch for it (it was too young for my kids by the time I found it)....  But you may want to try EasyPeasy All-in-One Homeschool.  I can't get the link to paste, but it will come up in Google.  It looks pretty darn good....

 

that's what I was going to suggest!  We are hoping to use some of it this summer--all online free stuff, and very well planned out.

 

Betsy

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You've got stuff around right? More than you could ever complete? And you have the educational background to tweak and write your own lessons plans? It's more that your plans were disrupted and your choices possibly taken away against your will?

 

Sorry, trying not to laugh.  :rofl:  but big :grouphug: too, cause…it hurts in the moment, even if in hindsight we are incredibly thankful. I'm thankful things turned out like they did for my oldest, but that doesn't mean I didn't cry myself to sleep when he was 13 and 14. It HURT!

 

Your husband is in the ministry and he's probably doing stuff like getting on his knees and saying, "Lord use me" and "Help me raise my kids to be of service to you", and then you are thinking you get to make plans.  :laugh:  Oh boy, this is rich! You are better than a really funny sitcom.

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You've got stuff around right? More than you could ever complete? And you have the educational background to tweak and write your own lessons plans? It's more that your plans were disrupted and your choices possibly taken away against your will?

 

 

Exactly.

 

 

Sorry, trying not to laugh.  :rofl:  but big :grouphug: too, cause…it hurts in the moment, even if in hindsight we are incredibly thankful. I'm thankful things turned out like they did for my oldest, but that doesn't mean I didn't cry myself to sleep when he was 13 and 14. It HURT!

 

It helps to know that these things work out for the best even if isn't what *I* plan...you can thank me later for the comedy relief. :001_tt2:

 

 

Your husband is in the ministry and he's probably doing stuff like getting on his knees and saying, "Lord use me" and "Help me raise my kids to be of service to you", and then you are thinking you get to make plans.  :laugh:  Oh boy, this is rich! You are better than a really funny sitcom.

 

 

Yep.   :biggrinjester:

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Paula, I don't really have a lot of useful info to add, but I wanted to send my sympathies and encouragement for this unexpected twist. I love how encouraging Hunter and others are being! We've had some lean years, and I've used a lot of free stuff (and the library). It's been nice, over the past couple of years, to spend a little more money to save myself some time, but I know it can be done more inexpensively.

 

Things I would look at:

Sheppardsoftware.com for geography games -- get a book or two from the library for a few countries, and you've got a nice "countries and cultures" thing going. Youtube can probably find some native speakers for various languages too. Heffer International has some free geography kits they were sending out a few years ago as well.

 

Some of the Burgess books are available free online, and for the bird one, there are the videos to go with them. Those plus some books about birds, and maybe a few free worksheets, and you've got science covered.

 

MEP for math.

 

Ask here or local friends for stuff you really do need. Does your local group have a lending library? That has been really helpful to me.

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If you already posted the answer to this I apologize, but what are you looking for specifically?  What id you plan to buy?  Or if that hadn't been decided what have you used in the past that worked well?  If we know this we can make suggestions of similar but more affordable/free options. 

 

 

 

I wanted to get a MP package for dd9.  She wants more independence, her own checklist, her OWN school.   

 

 

I wanted lots of computer-based stuff & audiobooks for ds7 (8 in June).  I hadn't decided exactly what???  Reflex games.  He's at just the right stage to try Beast Academy.  He's ready to start Apples & Pears.  

 

 

ds11 needs the next A&P wb.  I wanted to get him Patty Paper Geometry, Jousting Armadillos.   He needs some excellent literature for a dyslexic 11yo to draw him into reading.  I was looking into (not decided) on Analytical Grammar.  If I did AG and A&P over his 6th/7th/8th grade years, I think he'd be really solid in his *basic* LA skills.  Then I wanted to buy several writing currics from which to cherry-pick  from so I can assign him some writing that won't produce tears and gnashing of teeth.  (He's a very reluctant writer!)

 

I have Math Mammoth Blue Series, and I've used MEP and know how it goes.  I *can* do without buying any math, but the kids HATE MM and MEP is so teacher intensive that it's hard to stay consistent.  I have ILL on the shelf, but I lean more Classical when it comes to grammar...and, honestly, the archaic content is a turn-off at this point.  (dd9 *might* tolerate it.  ds11 definitely will NOT.)  I have Our Mother Tongue, and I can make my own lessons for him guided by that book.  I have FLL3 for ds7.  I have the old CW Primers, partially worked through.  I could do a little typing and make him some wb's based on those. I also have ELTL 3, which is great! I have good encyclopedias for history and science.  I have access to a decent library, and the librarian is happy to ILL.

 

 

 

*Things I don't already own.

 

ds7:

 

MEP 3

ELTL 3

Read to Mom a chapter a day & an hour of silent reading.  (Library List)

A&P Book A*

 

He would only cost $25 + printing MEP and wb for ELTL.

 

 

dd9:

 

Horizons Math 4*  (MEP and MM are just not options for her.)

ILL & a notebook  (We can try this.)

Rod & Staff Spelling*

Read to Mom a chapter a day & an hour of silent reading. (Library List)

The Young Writer's Companion.  

The Creative Writer 

 

She writes for fun, and STOLE TYWC out of the mailbox before I could get my hands on it. :lol:    She would cost less than $100.

 

 

 

ds11:

 

 

Math?  MEP???*

A&P book B*

Grammar & Writing lessons written by Mommy.  (Maybe I'll try KISS?)

Read to Mom a chapter a day & an hour of silent reading. (Library List)

 

He'll probably cost at least $100 after finding a math.

 

 

 

History:  We need to finish the SOTW series. 

 

Science:  We like the Nutshell Kits at Delta. ($$$), but we could make do with Van Cleave books I already have + library.

 

 

 

 

Typing all this out I'm kicking myself for making such a big deal over it. Yeah, my *perfect plan* would cost a lot of $$$, but I really can pull this off with about $300 (and do this well).  I can sell some things to come up with that, and we can spare some out of our normal budget.  I can write ds11's LA lessons...tbh, he's so asychronous, I would have to tweak anything I could buy anyway.

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One thing I have found out is that the more curriculum I have purchased and scheduled, the less room there is for fate/God to send life changing books and people into our lives. I am blind to the opportunities around me and turn my nose up at what I should not be.

 

I rush through more things instead of savoring fewer things. And I seem to just exponentially pick up speed.

 

Every time I schedule something explicit, I leave less room for a natural learning experience. Less natural learning takes place, so I stop trusting natural learning will take place.

 

Students begin changing. They get more passive, and less curious and independent.

 

What were the most important learning experiences for YOU as a child? Recently I was challenged to stop thinking of myself as poorly educated and to look at my many strengths more than my few weaknesses. As a child I read and read and read, unheeded by a mind-numbing force-fed curriculum. Yes, I missed out on some things, but they were details. Details that I am filling in now. But all in all, those books made me who I am.

 

Every moment doing curriculum is time spent NOT reading. And reading less is as important or more important than not completing curriculum.

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I wanted to get a MP package for dd9.  She wants more independence, her own checklist, her OWN school.   

 

 

I wanted lots of computer-based stuff & audiobooks for ds7 (8 in June).  I hadn't decided exactly what???  Reflex games.  He's at just the right stage to try Beast Academy.  He's ready to start Apples & Pears.  

 

 

ds11 needs the next A&P wb.  I wanted to get him Patty Paper Geometry, Jousting Armadillos.   He needs some excellent literature for a dyslexic 11yo to draw him into reading.  I was looking into (not decided) on Analytical Grammar.  If I did AG and A&P over his 6th/7th/8th grade years, I think he'd be really solid in his *basic* LA skills.  Then I wanted to buy several writing currics from which to cherry-pick  from so I can assign him some writing that won't produce tears and gnashing of teeth.  (He's a very reluctant writer!)

 

<snip>

 

It sounds like a great plan!  I would be mourning it too. 

 

I should confess that one reason I'm enjoying ILL with them right now is because we already completed a more systematic grammar during the school year.  I understand your hesitation with it. 

 

I like your new plans too!  They accomplish everything you need and give you a lot of freedom too.

 

 

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You have my sympathies - especially while homeschooling a picky, dyslexic, preteen! Been there, done that, lol.

Honestly, at this point, I would concentrate any budget you MIGHT have on him. I know it doesn't seem fair, but there are certain things that he sincerely NEEDS, vs the PREFERENCES of the other children (not liking a certain math, etc). He might do better with a spiral program if he has working memory issues (not sure if he does; I just know that many, if not most, of the dyslexic children at my dd's school do have working memory issues).

Apples and Pears is fantastic, so if there needs to be one "splurge", that should probably be it.

I have some fantastic literature I could send you for him! I have some of the Hank Zipzer series (if you don't know what those are, read up! Great books for a dyslexic kiddo to read).

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For math, have you read Ruth Beechick's You Can Teach Your Child Successfully?

http://www.amazon.com/You-Teach-Your-Child-Successfully/dp/0940319055/ref=la_B001JRUSKA_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1399637472&sr=1-8

 

I am using a 2nd edition of Saxon Algebra 1 for my own self-education and that is the 1st book in the series I used with my son back on the 90s. I think the current edition is a bit harder to use as an entry level book into the series, so I'm sticking with 2nd edition. So, as I'm working through this text, I am very aware of what I need to do to prep students for this book.

 

I'm feeling pretty confident that I don't need to start Saxon any earlier than Algebra 1, since I saw the Beechick scope and sequence. I think I am more than capable of using random free worksheets and vintage books, now that I know what to skip and what to complete, and it's all so neatly spread out before me.

 

There is a similar primary list in The Three R's, but there are no decent used copies available right now. There are plenty of nice used copies of You Can Teach Your Child Successfully available in both hardcover and paperback, right now, though.

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For my on the spectrum reluctant writer, the year he made the most writing progress, was the year he just listened to dramatized audio of the KJV while coloring pages I printed out from a free online source. Then he wrote 2 paragraphs. One paragraph needed to have a topic sentence that was merely a fact. The other paragraph needed to have a topic sentence that was an opinion or application statement. The following sentences needed to develop the topic sentences.

 

Doing this every morning consistently was so effective.

 

This year, I think I'm going to use the OLD LLATL books as a basic scope and sequence for each grade/level. Sometimes I will use them as written, but other times just as a scope and sequence, to do something similar with whatever books we are reading. They are thin, and most of the time an entire week is on a 2 page spread that I can see entirely at once. The OLD series is based strongly on the Beechick books, and I'm finding I need to read them to appreciate what the lessons are asking the student to do, and what the lessons are NOT asking a student to do.

 

Collecting the OLD books is a bit of pain, though. You can find them for affordable prices, but not always when you are looking for them. Sometimes you have to wait and wait and wait for a certain book.

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For content, I'm planning on using the OLD series of What Your _ Grader Needs to Know. These 1990 hardcovers are still widely available and very affordable. They can often be purchased from the same seller at thriftbooks.com and that saves on shipping.

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You have my sympathies - especially while homeschooling a picky, dyslexic, preteen! Been there, done that, lol.

Honestly, at this point, I would concentrate any budget you MIGHT have on him. I know it doesn't seem fair, but there are certain things that he sincerely NEEDS, vs the PREFERENCES of the other children (not liking a certain math, etc). He might do better with a spiral program if he has working memory issues (not sure if he does; I just know that many, if not most, of the dyslexic children at my dd's school do have working memory issues).

Apples and Pears is fantastic, so if there needs to be one "splurge", that should probably be it.

I have some fantastic literature I could send you for him! I have some of the Hank Zipzer series (if you don't know what those are, read up! Great books for a dyslexic kiddo to read).

 

I have tried CLE with him.  It gets us into a rut. He does well when I pull review from Strayer-Upton, CWP, etc...but focus learning like Singapore tb.  Time-consuming!!!

 

I think Saxon would be disastrous.  He's a whole-to-parts learner.

 

Horizons?  What else?  

 

I will check the library for those books.

 

 

 

For math, have you read Ruth Beechick's You Can Teach Your Child Successfully?

http://www.amazon.com/You-Teach-Your-Child-Successfully/dp/0940319055/ref=la_B001JRUSKA_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1399637472&sr=1-8

 

I am using a 2nd edition of Saxon Algebra 1 for my own self-education and that is the 1st book in the series I used with my son back on the 90s. I think the current edition is a bit harder to use as an entry level book into the series, so I'm sticking with 2nd edition. So, as I'm working through this text, I am very aware of what I need to do to prep students for this book.

 

I'm feeling pretty confident that I don't need to start Saxon any earlier than Algebra 1, since I saw the Beechick scope and sequence. I think I am more than capable of using random free worksheets and vintage books, now that I know what to skip and what to complete, and it's all so neatly spread out before me.

 

There is a similar primary list in The Three R's, but there are no decent used copies available right now. There are plenty of nice used copies of You Can Teach Your Child Successfully available in both hardcover and paperback, right now, though.

 

I've got both RB books.  

 

 

For my on the spectrum reluctant writer, the year he made the most writing progress, was the year he just listened to dramatized audio of the KJV while coloring pages I printed out from a free online source. Then he wrote 2 paragraphs. One paragraph needed to have a topic sentence that was merely a fact. The other paragraph needed to have a topic sentence that was an opinion or application statement. The following sentences needed to develop the topic sentences.

 

Doing this every morning consistently was so effective.

 

This year, I think I'm going to use the OLD LLATL books as a basic scope and sequence for each grade/level. Sometimes I will use them as written, but other times just as a scope and sequence, to do something similar with whatever books we are reading. They are thin, and most of the time an entire week is on a 2 page spread that I can see entirely at once. The OLD series is based strongly on the Beechick books, and I'm finding I need to read them to appreciate what the lessons are asking the student to do, and what the lessons are NOT asking a student to do.

 

Collecting the OLD books is a bit of pain, though. You can find them for affordable prices, but not always when you are looking for them. Sometimes you have to wait and wait and wait for a certain book.

 

I like the paragraph writing assignments.  I've been heading in that direction with him.  8filltheheart's writing has inspired me too.

 

 

I don't know where to go to find good used books locally.  (humph!)  I know there are plenty of HSers here so there must be a place where they buy/sell used books.  When I've looked at LLATL before, I've always dismissed it based on the book selections per level...it's never been a good fit for *my* kids.

 

 

 

I really think the key for my oldest is going to be writing my own lessons for him, based on what I know.  (This kind of freaks me out...doubting how much I REALLY know.)  I canNOT put him through another trial of a curric only to *fail.*  Whatever I do with him, it has to *look* like I just assigned this out of thin air so he doesn't see his own weaknesses compared to what other kids are doing.  That's why paragraph writing and 8's methods will work, I think.  I can tweak gradually as we go, and hopefully get him to high school able to write coherently.

 

 

I don't worry about content, tbh.  Somehow, my kids never fail to glean all sorts of information.  They are history and science junkies. I will splurge on SOTW 4 b/c I like how SWB makes everything fit together chronologically, and do without the AG unless I find it cheap/used.  I've got an idea for science.  We will utilize the library, and I'll spend some time teaching the kids how to utilize some kid-friendly search engines.  I saw a sample of a high school science based on inquiry, and I think I can tweak this for middle school.( I *have* a great science teacher book that includes demonstrations/experiments organized for inquiry-based science.) Basically, I will ask questions, have dc do some simple research, and write.  Here is where I can have ds11 just write paragraphs paragraphs paragraphs. Then he can read my teacher's book, and do the demo's for my other kids.  

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You have Strayer-Upton? Great. Look at the Ruth Beechick scope and sequence pulling from Strayer-Upton. I like S-U but get lost in it, especially the 3rd book. I'm hoping the RB lists can keep me focused, on track, and most of all confident.

 

The old series if LLATL doesn't have book units. Each week there is a dictation portion from a book you can use or not use, and then a 2 page spread of activities based on the dictation portion. The old series references Learning Grammar Through Writing, but you could use another reference. Obtaining Learning Writing through Grammar for a great price sometimes takes waiting, too. I got my copy for a $1.50.

 

The OLD LLatL assumes you have read Beechick. It's really quite different than the new series which is more open-and-go. I'm collecting the new series too, because I've have gotten some of them for pennies, but I'm just going to use them as a teacher resource to support the old series and not directly with students. I'll only glance at them when I'm convincing myself the the old series isn't enough and that it can't really be this easy. I might not use them at all, and really wouldn't mind not having them. 

 

For spelling I'm studying Beehick and hoping to reinforce what I'm using for early reading/phonics. I tend to switch back and forth between WRTR 4th and How to tutor/Alpha-phonics. I think I'm going to plan on using Alpha-Phonics this year.

 

If you can afford it, see if you can get a copy of one of the levels of the ORIGINAL LLATL. It would have worked with my spectrum kid. I just would have used the assignments applied to his Bible reading along with the paragraph writing he was doing. I would have read ahead a few weeks at a time, so I'd have a choice of topics to pick the one that best applied to something in the Bible reading.

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I just want to add something about the IRS:

 

If you have a state tax advocate (Virginia does) -- they have proven to me their worth. The IRS itself both lost my documents and refused to tell me what to do for 2 years, but the Virginia advocate had the issue resolved in just a few months. It was like a miracle for us.

 

We were in the right, of course.

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Hunter, I'm absorbing it all slowly.  It makes sense to work at about a 3rd grade level with him, especially with writing.  I was looking at the CAP W&R threads and thinking it'd be about right for him.  LOL  That said, I can use my copy of Aesop and do these lessons myself.  (I have CC Fables on the shelf for reference.....Hey - dd9 could use CC Fables that I HAVE on my shelf!!! :lol: )

 

 

 

I might give the IRS another call today and check the status.  I have no idea about a state advocate, but I will look into it if I don't see some forward progress.  Thanks!

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Latin.

 

We can finish GSWL.  We got about 1/2 way through and then we had a baby and then we moved.  We can review and finish, and maybe memorize more vocab if we have leftover time.  Any other free/super cheap ideas?  I own a good Latin/English dictionary, and a nice roots (L & Gr) resource.  What can I do with those?  How can I make a portion of the lessons independent?

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Now when you get your money, you will spend it more wisely, because you were forced to look at what you already had. The money on TOP of what has been talked about will go SO much further. I'll bet that money is not too far off from coming. You sound ready for it now. If it doesn't come, it's just because there is something RIGHT under your nose that you still have not identified as important for this year.

 

One of the biggest wastes of money and time is looking for remedial curriculum, instead of just backing up and using good quality primary resources. Often those books are right on our shelves, bought used for a penny, and maybe a little moldy.

 

The average spectrum boy will need bits and pieces of primary level language arts right up through high school, even if he is reading and comprehending at a college level.

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Latin.

 

We can finish GSWL. We got about 1/2 way through and then we had a baby and then we moved. We can review and finish, and maybe memorize more vocab if we have leftover time. Any other free/super cheap ideas? I own a good Latin/English dictionary, and a nice roots (L & Gr) resource. What can I do with those? How can I make a portion of the lessons independent?

The author of GSWL has a free curriculum using a public domain text to use after GSWL.

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The author of GSWL has a free curriculum using a public domain text to use after GSWL.

 

 

Link?  You can't taunt me with this information and forget to link! :drool5:

 

 

 

Exciting!  I have a great deal of respect for GSWL.  I took Latin all through high school...and was constantly thinking as I read through GSWL that I could have done so much more w/Latin if I could have started like this.

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