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What is the difference between SSI and ....


Luanne
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To qualify for SSI, not only do you have to be found disabled under the federal SSA guidelines, but you must meet income/resource requirements.  This is a small monthly benefit that is a set amount through federal guidelines.

 

Social Security Disability is a program that if you have worked, paid in, and earned a certain amount of credit (in quarters) and you meet the federal SSA guidelines for disability, will award a monthly payment based on your past earnings.  Your quarters of coverage (earned while working) are not good forever, though.  For example, if you worked full-time and stopped working completely, you would only be "insured" for about five years from the date you quit working.

 

Think of Social Security Disability as being "insurance" that you pay for while working.  Like other types of insurance, once you stop paying premiums (in this case, taxes from your earnings), your coverage will eventually end.

 

 

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Social Security Disability is a program that if you have worked, paid in, and earned a certain amount of credit (in quarters) and you meet the federal SSA guidelines for disability, will award a monthly payment based on your past earnings.  Your quarters of coverage (earned while working) are not good forever, though.  For example, if you worked full-time and stopped working completely, you would only be "insured" for about five years from the date you quit working.

 

 

What is your source for this information? I have never heard such a thing. ETA: http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/page7-11.html

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What is your source for this information? I have never heard such a thing. ETA: http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/page7-11.html

 

I agree; that has never been our experience with clients. There's a great deal of misinformation out there about SSI and SSDI! I think the AARP article is pretty well-researched, and it links back to SSA.gov, which is the "horse's mouth" so to speak. 

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Who is disabled? If it is an adult who was a substantial provider for your children, your children may qualify for a family benefit because if you are unable to work and provide, the SSD may find that the disabled person AND the children of the disabled person qualifies for benefits.

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For anyone who wants to understand the basic difference:

 

SSA is under Title II (passed first).  It's what you get if you have put enough into the system.

 

SSI is under Title XVI.  It was a later law, made to provide for those who did not have enough put into the SS system or who never put in.

 

Then, of course, there are different rules for each one, as mentioned by earlier posters.

 

For me, I finally was able to remember it by thinking they go chronologically and alphabetically, how my brain can remember things.

 

 

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What is your source for this information? I have never heard such a thing. ETA: http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/page7-11.html

 

 

I agree; that has never been our experience with clients. There's a great deal of misinformation out there about SSI and SSDI! I think the AARP article is pretty well-researched, and it links back to SSA.gov, which is the "horse's mouth" so to speak. 

 

 

My source is that evaluating claimants and determining if they qualify is my job and has been for more than a decade.

 

To receive Social Security Disability under Title II, if you are not found disabled prior to your DLI (date last insured), which is the future date that I referenced in my original post, you will not receive benefits.  You could actually meet the disability requirements TODAY, but if you are no longer insured (through past work credit) and you did not meet the requirements PRIOR to that expiration (DLI), you will not be eligible for benefits through that program.

 

Read more here: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/ProgData/insured.html

 

As you can see from the formula, it is very rare that one is permanently insured.  In fact, in over 10 years, I have not had a SINGLE case where a person was permanently insured. 

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