Jump to content

Menu

What will your 8th grader be reading?


Recommended Posts

There is probably something already on this topic somewhere, but I'm on my phone and can't search well.

 

While I don't assign a lot of reading to my ds (who reads like crazy anyhow), I like to make suggestions here and there. And though I have plenty if ideas for my dd, I'm coming up short when it comes to a 13 year old boy. So what are you all planning to have your 8th graders read? Historical period doesn't matter.

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's the mega list of resources that my daughter used when she was in 8th grade (quite some moons ago).  Since she'd only begun homeschooling in 7th grade, she was on the second year of a three year sweep through world history and was studying the time period AD500 to AD 1700.  The list includes books, videos and music.  She was/is a speedy reader so she read many more books than others might.

 

Asterisked entries were used only in part.

 

 

Eighth Grade History Reading and Resource List

 

Dorling Kindersley History of the World edited by Plantagenet Somerset Fry **

The Story of Mankind by Hendrik Willem van Loon  **

The Story of Mankind:  A Picturesque Tale of Progress by Olive Beaupre Miller **

The Hollow Hills by Mary Stewart

The Man Who Loved Books by Jean Fritz

Across a Dark and Wild Sea by Don Brown

The Sword in the Stone by T. H. White

Brendan the Navigator by Jean Fritz

The Illustrated History of the World, Vol. 3, Rome and the Classical West by J. M. Roberts **

The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley – audio (Vol. 1)

The Brendan Voyage by Tim Severin **

Then and Now by Stefania and Dominic Perring **

I am Mordred by Nancy Springer

The Illustrated History of the World, Vol. 4, The Age of Diverging Traditions by J. M. Roberts **

Tusk and Stone by Malcolm Bosse

Muhammad by Demi

The Shining Company by Rosemary Sutcliff

The Real Middle Earth by Brian Bates **

The Middle Ages by Mike Corbishley **

Beowulf the Warrior  by Ian Serraillier

Beowulf: A New Telling by Robert Nye

The Collected Beowulf by Gareth Hinds

Maples in the Mist by Minfong Ho

Ancient Cliff Dwellers of Mesa Verde by Caroline Arnold

The Arabian Nights retold by Neil Philip

The Age of Chivalry edited by Merle Severy **

His Majesty’s Elephant by Judith Tarr

Charlemagne and the Early Middle Ages by Miriam Greenblatt

Prison Window, Jerusalem Blue by Bruce Clements

Norse Gods and Giants by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire

The Real Vikings by Melvin and Gilda Berger

Medieval Knights by Trevor Cairns **

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle

The Story of Science:  Aristotle Leads the Way by Joy Hakim  **

The Edge on the Sword by Rebecca Tingle

Alfred the Great and the Saxons by Robin May

The Time Traveler Book of Viking Raiders by Anne Civardi and James Graham-Campbell

Blood Feud by Rosemary Sutcliff

The Song Dynasty by Scott Ingram

Hakon of Rogen’s Saga by Erik Haugaard

Early Explorers of North America by C. Keith Wilbur **

The Cartoon History of the Universe III by Larry Gonick

Fafnir by Bernard Evslin

The King’s Shadow by Elizabeth Alder

1000 Years Ago on Planet Earth by Sneed Collard

The Legend of the Cid by Robert Goldston

Shakespeare Stories by Leon Garfield **

Shakespeare and MacBeth:  The Story Behind the Play by James Barter

Shakespeare’s MacBeth  (video)

William the Conqueror by Thomas B. Costain

Anna of Byzantium by Tracy Barrett

A Travel Guide to Medieval Constantinople by James Barter

Robin Hood by Neil Philip

A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver by E. L. Konigsburg

Daily Life in the Middle Ages by Paul B. Newman **

Brother Cadfael videos: A Morbid Taste for Bones and Monk’s Hood

Tales of the Crusades by Olivia Coolidge

A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park

Saladin by Diane Stanley

In a Dark Wood by Michael Cadnum

The Story of the Wise Men by Regine Pernoud and Canon Grivot

Canticles of Ecstasy (the music of Hildegard von Bingen) by Sequentia

The Magna Charta by James H. Daugherty

Marvels of Science by Kendall Haven **

The Road to Damietta by Scott O’Dell

Eyewitness Medieval Life by Andrew Langley

Music of the Gothic Era (The Early Music Consort of London/David Munrow)

Brother Sun, Sister Moon (video) (Wertmuller and Zeffirelli)

Book of the Lion by Michael Cadnum

Angkor:  Heart of an Asian Empire by Bruno Dagens **

Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe (video, BBC production)

Quest for a Maid by Frances Hendry

Castle by David Macaulay

The Ramsay Scallop by Frances Temple

Girl in a Cage by Jane Yolen

Archers, Alchemists, and 98 Other Jobs You Might Have Loved or Loathed by Priscilla Galloway

The King’s Swift Rider by Mollie Hunter

Marco Polo:  To China and Back by Steven Otfinoski

Cathedral by David Macaulay

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer as retold by Geraldine McCaughrean

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales (read by Prunella Scales and Martin Starkie)**

Dog of the Bondi Castle by Lynn Hall

Harold the Herald by Dana Fradon

Traveling Man:  The Journey of Ibn Battuta, 1325-1354 by James Rumford

The Inferno of Dante (cantos 1 – 5) translated by Robert Pinsky

Beckett (video, 1964)

The Lion in Winter (video, 1968)

A Distant Mirror by Barbara Tuchman **

The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly

The Second Mrs. Giaconda by E. L. Konigsburg

Rats, Bulls, and Flying Machines by Deborah Prum

The Passion of Joan of Arc (video, 1928, Carl Th. Dreyer)

1492:  Music from the Age of Discovery by The Waverly Consort 

The Cargo of the Madalena by Cynthia Harnett

1492:  The Year of the New World by Piero Ventura

The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain

Great Painters by Piero Ventura **

Accidental Explorers by Rebecca Stefoff **

Greensleeves:  A Collection of English Lute Songs by Julianne Baird and Ronn McFarlane

Beware, Princess Elizabeth by Carolyn Meyer

The Sea King:  Sir Francis Drake and His Times by Albert Marrin

Elizabeth R:  The Lion’s Cub (video, BBC production, 1971)

Elizabeth (video, 1998, with Cate Blanchett)

Den of the White Fox by Lensey Namioka

From Coronado to Escalante:  The Explorers of the Spanish Southwest by John Miller Morris

Cantos 1 – 5 of Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves:  A retelling of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Book 1 by Roy Maynard

On the Banks of the Helicon:  Early Music of Scotland by the Baltimore Consort

The Inquisition (video, The History Channel, 1996)

The Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes (adapted by Leighton Barret)

The World of Captain John Smith by Genevieve Foster **

The World of Lully by the Chicago Baroque Ensemble

John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress retold by Gary D. Schmidt

I, Juan de Pareja by Elizabeth Borton de Trevino

Dowland:  Ayres and Lute Lessons by the Deller Consort

Out of Many Waters by Jacqueline Dembar Greene

The Trial and Execution of Charles I by Leonard W. Cowie

Rembrandt by Ceciel de Bie and Martijn Leenen

The Reduced Shakespeare Company (video, Acorn Media, 2003)

Witch Child by Celia Rees

At the Sign of the Sugared Plum by Mary Hooper

Vivaldi’s Ring of Mystery:  A Tale of Venice and Violins (audio)

Girl with a Pearl Earring (video, 2003)

 

Regards,

Kareni

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a few lined up but I'm looking for more:

 

A Little History of the World

Science Matters

Richard Halliburton's Book of Marvels

The Count of Monte Cristo

Man in the Iron Mask

Sherlock Homes

Journey to the Center of the Earth

Arabian Nights

LOTR books

Study is Hard Work

50 Things Every Young Gentleman Should Know

Fallacy Detective

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

These are all great lists. Our DS is also an avid reader and rising 8th grade.

Some of these might be redundant from prior posts:

Tolkien

Jules Verne (author's worldview not as problematic for us as HG Wells). Mysterious Island was our son's fav. I think many Verne books are free on Kindle.

Swiss Fam Robinson, Treasure Island, Robinson Caruso, Sherlock Holmes, etc. -- free Kindle versions available!

Depending on your personal convictions-- our DS has loved the Left Behind series (originals, not the kids' books). Plenty of violence and intense scenes as you can imagine.

JC Ryle -- Thoughts for Young Men

Lew Wallace -- Ben Hur, a Tale of The Christ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my son's list.  We are doing classical lit from 1880 onward this year.  He likes many to choose from, so he won't read all of these. Although he has read all the Victorian Era lit because he really likes gothic.  We both decided to avoid the WW1 and WW2 war classics because of the serious emotional maturity required.

 

 

Victorian Era

Life of Fredrick Douglas

Importance of Being Earnest

Wuthering Heights

Dracula

Tales of Mystery and Terror

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Turn of the Screw Henry James

Great Expectations

Victorian Gothic Short Stories (compilation)

 

Exploration

King Solomon's Mines

heart of Darkness (Did not like)

 

Russia

We by Yevgeny Zamyatin

Cherry Orchard 

The Collected Tales of Nicolai Gogol  

 

Between the Wars
Great Gatsby
Growing up by Baker (about great depression)
Metamorphosis (Did not like)

WW2
Endless Steppe (I do not like Diary of Anne Frank)
Catch 22
Slaughterhouse 5
Joy in the Morning by Wodehouse

Asia
Rickshaw Boy
The Good Earth

Environmentalism
Silent Spring

Civil Rights
Why we Can't Wait
To Kill a Mocking Bird

Cold War
The Crucible
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Other Lit
Old Man and the Sea
Travels with Charley
Shakespear (his choice)

Lord of the Flies

The Luminaries (2014 Booker Prize winner)
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are using the Moving Beyond the Page LA curriculum, and the lessons are taken from live books, which I LOVE b/c I don't have to assign separate reading material for DD and she gets to read some great books.  The line up (this year is all about modern history): 

Abigail Adams

Animal Farm

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Story of Science: Einstein Adds a New Dimension

Elijah of Buxton

The House of Scorpion

Watership Down

The Book Thief

To Kill A Mockingbird

Great American Poets

 

For History we are using History Odyssey (Modern Times - Logic stage) since they also use the live books as part of the lesson, these are the books she'll be reading for her history lessons:

Around the World in 80 Days

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Things Fall Apart

The Red Badge of Courage

The Red Baron

No Promises in the Wind

Chinese Cinderella

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD has been chomping at the bit to be allowed to read "Hunger Games", "Maze Runner", and "Brave New World" so I told her that when she gets to 8th grade, we'll do a dystopian literature course. She'll be 13 so I think she'll be old enough for handling the dark themes. We'll also be studying modern history so it'll fit in with that. I haven't totally figured out which books to assign, but some of the ones I'm thinking:

 

the above listed books

The Giver

Animal Farm

1984

Fahrenheit 451

The Time Machine (she's actually already read this but we haven't discussed it as literature)

A Canticle for Leibowitz

Iron Heel by Jack London

 

I've heard "Day of the Oprichnik" by Vladimir Sorokin and "The Slynx" by Tatyana Tolstaya suggested and I would like to include a book that's not written by an American or Brit. I've got to read these to see whether either or both should be included on my list.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD has been chomping at the bit to be allowed to read "Hunger Games", "Maze Runner", and "Brave New World" so I told her that when she gets to 8th grade, we'll do a dystopian literature course.

 

My oldest dd did a year long study of dystopian literature in 8th grade. I can dig out her booklist if you're interested. We included short stories and novels. It was probably our best literature year ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd love to see your list, Sharon! I love dystopias, but my list of favorites is mostly not very kosher for middle school, I don't think.  We did The Giver, The Lottery, and The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas this year, together, and she's reading DuPre's City of Ember series and Haddix's Among the Hidden series on her own.  

 

I think Harrison Bergeron would be good for middle school - a very short story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD has been chomping at the bit to be allowed to read "Hunger Games", "Maze Runner", and "Brave New World" so I told her that when she gets to 8th grade, we'll do a dystopian literature course. She'll be 13 so I think she'll be old enough for handling the dark themes. We'll also be studying modern history so it'll fit in with that. I haven't totally figured out which books to assign, but some of the ones I'm thinking:

 

 

 

My 12yo DS read all 3 hunger games books, as well as seen both movies. And I read all 3 books as well. They are OK for a younger audience. I worried at first, but he loved them. Read them again and again and again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DD has been chomping at the bit to be allowed to read "Hunger Games", "Maze Runner", and "Brave New World" so I told her that when she gets to 8th grade, we'll do a dystopian literature course.

Not Brave New World.  :eek:     I did this one with my 12 year old last year and should have waited.  It is a book about sex, sexual liberation, societal control by way of sex, and the importance of multiple partners.  I'm pretty liberal, but my son was like :001_huh:

 

Ruth in NZ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 12yo DS read all 3 hunger games books, as well as seen both movies. And I read all 3 books as well. They are OK for a younger audience. I worried at first, but he loved them. Read them again and again and again.

 

Mine too. He loves those books.

 

Adding dystopian lit to my sci-fi/fantasy/Steampunk list for next year!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My oldest dd did a year long study of dystopian literature in 8th grade. I can dig out her booklist if you're interested. We included short stories and novels. It was probably our best literature year ever.

 

I'd loe to see this list!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Not Brave New World. :eek: I did this one with my 12 year old last year and should have waited. It is a book about sex, sexual liberation, societal control by way of sex, and the importance of multiple partners. I'm pretty liberal, but my son was like :001_huh:

 

Ruth in NZ

Actually all those reasons are why I am planning on reading it to my son between twelve and thirteen. None if the sex and drugs are depicted well. They are seen as quick fixes rather than true relationships which involve struggle and emotional attachment. For a kid on the brink of some major life choice and peer pressure years those are pretty strong lessons.

 

My largest issue is the suicide at the end from the only redeeming character because he cannot handle living in such a vapid world devoid of anything real.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anthem by Ayn Rand is one of the great dystopian books that often gets looked over. Around 100 pages of great literature.

 

 

Another wonderful and often overlooked short book is We by Yevgeny Zamyatin.  For my money, it's much better than Anthem but covers similar themes.  Of the two, I'd pick We.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...