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Well, you can see if local public schools would do testing but quality and willingness and timeliness vary widely from school to school.  Also, if you had a University near you that might offer a cheaper version.  Again, quality will vary so check what they are actually willing to do, not just with the assessment itself but also with any follow up explanations.  You might at least call around and see what local neuropshychs are charging.  Again, quality and pricing may vary widely, as I understand it, so don't balk at the first quote.  Keep checking around.  You might get lucky.  Scottish Rite does some assessments but I don't know if they asses for ADD.  I think psychiatrists actually do more of that but can't say for certain. 

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Well if the school won't test her, but your mommy instincts are saying she needs an assessment, I say keep looking.  Call around.  Ask questions.  Keeping looking to see if there is anyone around that could at least do a preliminary assessment and give you some guidance.  Talk to your pediatrician if you feel they are knowledgeable (ours was pleasant but clueless regarding learning issue).  Sometimes it can take months to get in to see a specialist even if you find someone you can afford so the sooner you start looking the greater your chances of finding answers before the start of the next school year.

 

:grouphug:

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You wrote that the school wont do testing. 

 

But: "The law about the requirement to evaluate if requested by the child’s parent is clear and unambiguous:

 
"A State educational agency, other State agency, or local educational agency [school district] shall conduct a full and individual initial evaluation ... either the parent of a child, or a State education agency, other State agency, or local educational agency may initiate a request for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability." 20 USC 1414(a)(1)"
 
 
While it might be termed as a request from a parent?
It is actually an advisement, which the school is legally required to comply with.
But it does need to be formally requested, with a written and dated letter, and confirmation that they have recieved it.
Which you keep a copy of.
Schools rely on parents not knowing the law, and what they are legally required to do. 
But the laws are specifically designed, to empower the parents.
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She is doing okay in school academically at the moment except for behavior stuff so the school won't do testing . She talks when she isn't supposed to be, doesn't make good use of her time and she looks around the room and moves in her chair.

Both my boys behave the way you describe except my 9 year old does not talk. For them it is a boredom issue. My 8 year old has been evaluated for ADHD. School would do it for us for free but we opt for private. He does not have ADHD apparently but might have SPD (more on the sensory seeking aspects).

My school district has a request for evaluation form to be filled up and handed to the school secretary. If there is no form, you can write a letter requesting for an evaluation. My district does testing for ADHD, autism and speech.

The thing is that after the evaluation, the psychologist could conclude that there is insignificant grounds to suspect ADHD.

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Geodob is absolutely correct.  The school MUST evaluate if you request it--In WRITING.  We learned from our wranglings with our evasive public school that if you don't put it in writing--it never happened.  In other words, you should write a letter to your school and use the IDEA language.. and specifically say, "We suspect <our daughter> may have a learning disability, and we hereby request that you perform a comprehensive evaluation to determine the nature of her difficulties with school. You may consider this letter as "Consent to Evaluate" so that you may begin the evaluation process immediately."  -- Leave it at that. 

Don't tell them WHAT diability you suspect or they will limit testing to a narrow scope.  You do not have to give them any REASON for suspecting there is a disability.  There is no differentiation in IDEA as to what types of issues warrant an evaluation and what kinds don't.  The only criteria is that if ANYONE SUSPECTS a disability, then the school is obligated to test.

 

Now, depending upon your school district, the evaluation may be great or it may be lousy.  I've seen both come out of school districts, with the lousy category far exceeding the number of great school evaluations.  It'll all depend upon your public school system, their attitude about disabilities, and whether they play games or not.  Just the little hint of them telling you that she doesn't qualify for or need testing gives me the gut feeling they are not a high quality, proactive, do all we can kind of school! 

 

You should know too that by IDEA laws, from the date that consent to evaluate is received, they have 60 days to complete the testing.  That is 60 calendar days and it does not cease due to breaks, summer, etc.  That is why you put the sentence about "consent to evaluate" into your initial request letter.. Otherwise they may take weeks or months to send you a consent form to sign!  I've seen it happen lots of times when schools don't think they need to evaluate.

 

That said, if you can save up for a comprehensive, private, neuropsychological evaluation, that will likely be money well spent.  Just be sure to do your research and find someone who will do a comprehensive job of evaluating so you will know precisely how to address your DDs needs. ;-)  Feel free to email me questions if you have any.. I've completed a year long Special Education Advocacy course, have a Master's Degree in Instructional Design that I use to figure out how BEST to teach a child, and have been at this for more than a decade.  I'm always happy to point people to resources and information if it will help them help their kids!!

 

 

 

You wrote that the school wont do testing. 

 

But: "The law about the requirement to evaluate if requested by the child’s parent is clear and unambiguous:

 
"A State educational agency, other State agency, or local educational agency [school district] shall conduct a full and individual initial evaluation ... either the parent of a child, or a State education agency, other State agency, or local educational agency may initiate a request for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is a child with a disability." 20 USC 1414(a)(1)"
 
 
While it might be termed as a request from a parent?
It is actually an advisement, which the school is legally required to comply with.
But it does need to be formally requested, with a written and dated letter, and confirmation that they have recieved it.
Which you keep a copy of.
Schools rely on parents not knowing the law, and what they are legally required to do. 
But the laws are specifically designed, to empower the parents.

 

 

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