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Please share your history lineup for 6th, 7th, and 8th grades...


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 I will have a 6th grader next year. He covered ancient, medieval, and 2 years  of American history (early and later) in grades 2-5.  Do I repeat this lineup again in middle school years?  I could do a year of geography in 8th grade before high school; we use MFW for high school.  But then, what would I do for grades 6 and 7?


 


What would you suggest for these middle grades for history?  What would make it more interesting?  Round history subjects out?  Make it more interesting?  Incorporate writing?  


 


This is my last kiddo to guide through jr. high.  If there is a way to spice up the history line-up, I want to hear about it.


 

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I thought we would go back through and start over.  But now, as we end cycle one, I'm thinking we're going to go interest led.  Eeek!  Feels a little like stepping of a cliff, but I'm kind of excited and I still plan to return to a full cycle through starting in 8th or 9th grade.

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I am going to be using BJU history in middle school which is Ancient, World, and US history. The student activity manuals look amazing and include outlining, graphic organizers, essay writing, mapping, source documents, etc.  I plan to add in a few historical fiction books along the way and use the Perspective Timeline game as reinforcement of learning the major events and possibly some card games such as Professor Noggins. I am really looking forward to it! 

 

I plan to incorporate some geography throughout the 3 years using MP Review books for memorization of places and names. I've done some cultural geography things in co-ops, so I might save that part for high school geography. 

 

 

 

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In K-4, Doodle didn't do a 4 year rotation of world history. He did WP AW and some world geography, 2 years of world history, US history, and WP CATW. This year in 5th he is doing ancient history through Rome.

 

6th: Dark Ages- Age of Absolutism

 

I am not sure about 7th and 8th. He will either do a two year US- world history combo or he will do the Age of Revolution- 20th Century world history in 7th and US history in 8th.

 

HTH-

Mandy

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We've done Modern World history in 6th - the 20th century +, basically.  We will do a combo of non-western (or not entirely western) ancient history plus Big History in 7th grade.  The current plan for 8th grade is kind of a foundations of western civ/greece & Rome/Medieval in 8th, but that's subject to interest and inclination.

 

I think Big History is a great idea for a between year - before starting on the cycle again, or doing interest led history study in high school.  Totally worthy as a middle school course.

 

https://www.bighistoryproject.com/portal

 

Other than that, I'd be inclined to ask the kid if there is an area/era of history he's interested in exploring.  I kind of think it's good to "make" them go through the cycle once, but then after that let it be much more interest-driven.  Especially in middle school.

 

 

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4th grade was our first year homeschooling so we have not completed any cycles yet. We are slogging through the Ancients which is no fun at all, and will do the Middle Ages and continue with the cycle until 8th. I plan to supplement with unit studies(there are some on the Stanford website as well as the project based ones on the plague, etc)books and documentaries as we've done to date.

ETA we also do some history based on travels: we just did DC and plan Philadelphia for this summer. Also tenement museum in NYC and stuff like that.

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Well, we mostly did interest-led history for K-4, which translated to being very heavy on pre-Columbian Americas through to Industrial Revolution, excluding the Civil War.

For the second half of 4th (right now) it's been more of a hybrid between science and history ala Big History and evolutionary approach. I am actually slowly getting us to be ready to start the ancients but meandering through this path.

 

So, when I conclude that we've beaten this path enough, we'll be starting with a mix of OUP and K-12 Human Odyssey Ancients. I am going to merge it with Hakim's Joy of Science plus some content from living math history units. I'm very into tying science and history together. I'm also tying in McHenry's Mapping the World by Art to integrate geography too.

 

I have the next OUP set for Medieval/early modern and the next K-12 HO book to follow. Will tie in similar things. I assume those will keep us busy for at least grades 5-6, possibly into 7th depending on how many paths we wander along.

 

We really, really, really love history and science so I make up my own flow tying things together.

 

 

I am going to do a full US History in grade 8 with Hakim's materials probably.

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I never know how to advise others with this question. ;)

 

BUT, I can share from our own experience that being flexible ended up working great here. My initial plan when starting homeschooling with DSs in grades 1 and 2 was three 4-year chronological history cycles.

 

Our first chronological history cycle spread out from 4 to 6 years, as we bunnytrailed, and spent about 1.5 years on American history in those elementary grades. That took us up through DSs grades 6 and 7.

 

When DSs were grades 7 and 8, we were burned out on straight chronological history, so we did a year of cultural geography/comparative religions, with some beginning worldview. It was super -- one of our all-time favorite years! We only got through Australia and New Zealand, a number of South Pacific and far-Eastern Hemisphere nations and barely touched on the Middle East and African nations. I would have LOVED to have had a second year to also cover European, Caribbean, and Latin American nations!

 

I thought at that point we would do another 4-year chronological study for high school, but to make room time-wise for special interest credits and extracurricular activities, with the limited amount of high school credits you can realistically accomplish during high school, we ended up going with interest-led to accomplish the required amounts of Social Studies credits... and then, once the requirements were fulfilled, other needs/interests crowded in and we ended up dropping History entirely in the last high school years.

 

So, in high school, for History, we managed:

1 year Ancient World

1 year 20th century World

1 year American History

0.5 year Church History and 0.25 year Medieval World

… and then of course, the required 0.5 credit each of Government and Economics

 

 

Based on our high school experience, I'd say, use those middle school years to pursue History/Social Studies topics you might not have time for in high school, and/or topics that would be of high interest to your family. Doing a chronological 4-year cycle in high school is harder (but not impossible), as is pursuing History/Social Studies topics of personal interest.

 

High school Social Studies becomes a lot more rigid and about box-checking -- i.e., state graduation requirements and college freshman admission requirements of 1 year American History, 1 year World History, 0.5 year each of Gov't and Econ, AND in many places 1 year World Geography… 

 

One helpful way to plan is to look at what you MUST do and WANT to do for History/Social Studies for the 4 years of high school -- and then work backwards for the middle school years:

- What would best prepare your student for those 4 years of high school History/Social Studies?

- What would you want to do in 8th grade that would best "flow" the student into the 9th grade History studies? (and then, of course, what would best be done in 7th grade to "flow" the student into 8th grade)

- What might the student NOT get in high school that you want to make sure to get in during middle school?

- What will the student do first in 9th grade History/Social Studies, so DON'T do the same thing or something similar in 7th or 8th grade so that it's a repeat...

 

BEST of luck in deciding what works best for your middle school years! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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We are officially starting middle school next year, and here's what we're doing for history:

 

6th: K12 Human Odyssey - parts highlighting ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome

Dorothy Mills' history books: Book of the Ancient World, Book of the Greeks, and Book of the Romans

in conjunction with A Mind In The Light's Book Notes on all three (Ancient World and Book of the Greeks are already done, Book of the Romans is likely going to be done by this fall)

 

7th: K12 Human Odyssey and Dorothy Mills' Book of the Middle Ages and Book of the Renaissance and Reformation Times

 

8th: K12 Human Odyssey: Modern Times to Contemporary Era

 

ETA: These are all rounded out with Usborne History Encyclopedia, Landmark biographies, and other high-quality, engaging books

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We did more or less interest led when DD was in K through 5th. We did medieval history when she and her brother were interested in castles (K and 3rd), ancients last year (2nd and 5th), and a whole lot of American history up to the Civil War in between and before medieval and ancients. So this year, 6th, DD has been working through History Odyssey's Early Modern, using Kingfisher, and we also just added k12's Human Odyssey (instead of History Odyssey's suggested Story of Mankind); we have been taking a slow pace, and she will finish it sometime next year. Then she'll go on to Modern history, probably with HO/Kingfisher/Human Odyssey, but we're not quite sure yet. That should take her through the rest of 7th and 8th grades.

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Thank you, Farrar...

I would also be interested in HOW everyone does their history. What is practical and effective.... Not really cute or artsy.

 

Well, we're not to middle school yet, but I used to teach middle school history, so I feel like I can still answer.  I don't think we'll do things radically different.  We read books, discuss, do written narrations, watch videos and take field trips.  We occasionally do crafts and cooking things and so forth, but not too often anymore.  We don't do tests or anything like that.  I like to have a spine and go off that, but we really thrive on living books.  For example we, just finished up WWII.  We read more than two dozen books, including historical fiction like The Winged Watchman and Number the Stars and we did Bomb, which was a Newbery Honor book last year as a read aloud (great segue to the Cold War too).  And, of course, we did many shorter books as well and several shorter videos and a field trip to the Holocaust Museum and the wars exhibit at the Smithsonian.  When I was school teaching, I did have kids writing papers in 7th and 8th grades...  not sure if we'll do that or not.  Our experience with history has been a lot richer and more in depth than what most kids I taught had.  We will probably focus our writing attention elsewhere and I'll leave history and research papers to high school primarily.

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Wow!  Thanks everyone!  Since starting this thread, we have been on the move and out of the house.  I've just gotten home, and have read through all of the replies.  So many of you are sticking to a chronological type of plan which is what I have always naturally assumed we would do.  I really appreciate the idea of allowing middle school history to be somewhat interest led especially when the dc has already gone through one history cycle.  I also love and intend to include geography.... and I remembered that I have Mapping the World with Art!!!  I bought it to use this year, but we ran out of hours in the day.  I put in in a drawer and have not looked at it since!  

 

I need to read the thread again a little more slowly and absorb all of your suggestions.  

 

Many thanks, all!

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Well, we're not to middle school yet, but I used to teach middle school history, so I feel like I can still answer.  I don't think we'll do things radically different.  We read books, discuss, do written narrations, watch videos and take field trips.  We occasionally do crafts and cooking things and so forth, but not too often anymore.  We don't do tests or anything like that.  I like to have a spine and go off that, but we really thrive on living books.  For example we, just finished up WWII.  We read more than two dozen books, including historical fiction like The Winged Watchman and Number the Stars and we did Bomb, which was a Newbery Honor book last year as a read aloud (great segue to the Cold War too).  And, of course, we did many shorter books as well and several shorter videos and a field trip to the Holocaust Museum and the wars exhibit at the Smithsonian.  When I was school teaching, I did have kids writing papers in 7th and 8th grades...  not sure if we'll do that or not.  Our experience with history has been a lot richer and more in depth than what most kids I taught had.  We will probably focus our writing attention elsewhere and I'll leave history and research papers to high school primarily.

 

Thanks, Farrar.

The one year of history my son seems to love is ancients.  We covered this time period with his older siblings when he was in 2nd grade, and he has been asking to do it again for a couple of years!  Thing is, back in 2nd grade, there were three kids going through history together.  The kids had each other to enjoy discussion.  Our history was like our down time.... school, yet fun.  We always had tremendous conversations when we did history.

 

Both older kids will be in high school next year.  The 9th grader will use MFW Ancients, but he'll do this independently.  My youngest will be stuck with me, and I just want him to enjoy history (and learn something in the process.)

 

I think we'll include the IEW Themed Ancient Writing book.  I think integration of subjects is a practical and effective part of doing history. Writing is better than testing in my opinion. Those ideas are more likely to stick when they are part of a paragraph/report.   I agree with you about having a spine and living books.  Honestly, I will have to see what I have left from doing ancients so many years ago.  I should have some living books.... I hope.  

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Thanks, Farrar.

The one year of history my son seems to love is ancients… The 9th grader will use MFW Ancients, but he'll do this independently.  My youngest will be stuck with me, and I just want him to enjoy history (and learn something in the process.)… I agree with you about having a spine and living books. 

 

Here are some great living books, perfect for 6th grade DS, to get you started. Enjoy ransacking your local library! And don't forget documentaries and films set in ancient time periods!

 

General Non-Fiction

- Kingfisher Book of the Ancient World: Ice Age to the Fall of Rome (Martell)

- Ancient Egyptians and Their Neighbors (Broida) -- Mesopotamia, Egypt, Nubia, Hittite

- Ancient Israelites and Their Neighbors (Broida) -- Israel, Philistia, Phoenicia

- Internet Linked: Usborne Encyclopedia of the Ancient World (Bingham)

- How The Bible Came to Us (Doney)

 

Mesopotamia

- Gilgamesh the Hero (McCaughrean)

- Peoples of the Ancient World: Life in Ancient Mesopotamia (Mehta-Jones)

- DK: Eyewitness Books: Mesopotamia (Steele)

 

Egypt

- Tales of Ancient Egypt (Green)

- The Golden Goblet (McGraw)

- God King (Williamson) -- Egypt / Israel

- Hittite Warrior -- Egypt / Israel / Hittite

- Science of the Past: Science in Ancient Egypt

- Landmark: Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt (Payne)

- Pyramid (Macauley)

 

Greece

- The Librarian Who Measured the Earth (Lasky) -- a picture book, but well worth it for an older student too

- Science of the Past: Science in Ancient Greece (Gay)

- Tools of the Ancient Greeks (Bordessa)

- Archimedes and the Door of Science (Bendick)

- Galen and the Gateway to Medicine (Bendick)

- Greek Myths (Coolidge) -- OR -- Tanglewood Tales / Wonder Book (Hawthorne)

- The Trojan War (Coolidge) -- OR -- Black Ships Before Troy (Sutcliff)

- Wanderings of Odysseus (Sutcliff)

- Jason and the Golden Fleece (Riordan)

- The Aeneid for Boys and Girls (Church -- OR -- In Search of a Homeland (Lively)

 

Rome

- Science in Ancient Rome (Harris)

- Rome Antics (Macauley)

- The Bronze Bow (Speare) -- Rome / Israel

- Ben Hur (Wallace) -- Rome / Israel

- Detectives in Togas; Mystery of the Roman Ransom (Winterfeld)

- Eagle of the Ninth -- Romans in early Britain

 

China

- Science of the Past: Science in Ancient China (Beshore)

- Peoples of the Ancient World: Life in Ancient China (Challan)

- DK: Eyewitness Books: Ancient China (Cotterell)

 

India

- The Ancient World: Ancient India (Lassieur)

- Peoples of the Ancient World: Life in the Ancient Indus River Valley (Richardson)
 
Ancient Britain
- The Celts: See Through History (Martell)
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For the middle years, we do history through read alouds, discussion, and classics of the same era. My dh does the reading and he really really likes narrative nonfiction, basically non-fiction that reads more like a story.  This is our list for this year:
 
modern history narrative non-fiction book list- post 2 in thread
 
They discuss as much as the read, and get out maps, and make connections.  Concurrently, my boys read literature of and about the era.  So for the Roaring 20s my older ds read The Great Gatsby, for the victorian era he read Oliver Twist, etc.  Then, he and I discuss how these books act as a commentary of the era and how the era they were written in affects the view point of the author. 
 
We don't use a spine, and don't do output of any kind.  We do no time lines, no primary sources, no outlining, no memory work.
 
Now I am sure that my kids don't know all the names and dates that others might, but boy oh boy do they have the big picture.  They LOVE history, and they can hold their own in any conversation.
 
Ruth in NZ

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For the middle years, we do history through read alouds, discussion, and classics of the same era. My dh does the reading and he really really likes narrative nonfiction, basically non-fiction that reads more like a story.  This is our list for this year:

 

modern history narrative non-fiction book list- post 2 in thread

 

They discuss as much as the read, and get out maps, and make connections.  Concurrently, my boys read literature of and about the era.  So for the Roaring 20s my older ds read The Great Gatsby, for the victorian era he read Oliver Twist, etc.  Then, he and I discuss how these books act as a commentary of the era and how the era they were written in affects the view point of the author. 

 

We don't use a spine, and don't do output of any kind.  We do no time lines, no primary sources, no outlining.

 

Now I am sure that my kids don't know all the names and dates that others might, but boy oh boy do they have the big picture.  They LOVE history, and they can hold their own in any conversation.

 

Ruth in NZ

I love this!! What a refreshing, liberating approach to ENJOYING history together. Thank-you for sharing your family's style. 

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We're going to keep on with chronological but I also like keeping history interest-driven with not a whole pile of output. I use History Revealed, which I think lends itself toward these goals. I was thinking of structuring our history lessons around the Diana Waring audios and then each kid can read further about things that interest them in the many history books I already have. We also keep a timeline on the wall and do one "research" project per unit, make a map of the region we're studying, and next year I also want to incorporate more art, music and cooking. 

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My oldest has been doing an in depth Am History year as well. I don't feel we covered Ancient/Middle Ages well at all (we had a very shaky start even getting him the slightest bit interested in history for years) , so I think I will cycle back and use Pandia Press History Odyssey level 2 for those time periods.

 

I already use the Pandia Press timeline, and those levels have more in depth timeline analysis and outlining/writing activities. I'd like to use K12 Human Odyssey texts as our main read aloud. 

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6th--OUP (Near Eastern World, Greek, Roman)

        Pus survey of other areas (China, India, Africa, etc.) with a textbook--not sure which one yet

       Plus review of Middle Ages (summer reading Medieval Days and Ways (Hartman))

       Plus Studies Weekly social studies (New Hampshire 5th grade) to review U.S. History

 

7th--Similar plan except focus on Middle Ages mostly with OUP Medieval and Early Modern World,

    Plus review of Ancient history

    Plus review of U.S. History

 

8th--Similar except focus on U.S. History

    Plus review of Ancient history

    Plus review of Middle Ages

 

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For those who do not use a spine, or use one very loosely (like we do with Ancients which we cannot abide)--where do find lists of your living books/documentaries?

I work part time I find so much of my time is consumed sourcing these. The SOTW activity book is used exclusively for this in my house, for example.

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For the middle years, we do history through read alouds, discussion, and classics of the same era. My dh does the reading and he really really likes narrative nonfiction, basically non-fiction that reads more like a story.  This is our list for this year:

 

modern history narrative non-fiction book list- post 2 in thread

 

They discuss as much as the read, and get out maps, and make connections.  Concurrently, my boys read literature of and about the era.  So for the Roaring 20s my older ds read The Great Gatsby, for the victorian era he read Oliver Twist, etc.  Then, he and I discuss how these books act as a commentary of the era and how the era they were written in affects the view point of the author. 

 

We don't use a spine, and don't do output of any kind.  We do no time lines, no primary sources, no outlining, no memory work.

 

Now I am sure that my kids don't know all the names and dates that others might, but boy oh boy do they have the big picture.  They LOVE history, and they can hold their own in any conversation.

 

Ruth in NZ

 

I like this!  I think I'll add some historical reading in judiciously from this and incorporate some of this into my own methods!

 

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I like this!  I think I'll add some historical reading in judiciously from this and incorporate some of this into my own methods!

I'm so glad you like it; it works for us. DH has been reading out loud for about an hour 5 days a week for 9 years. My oldest at age 13 has no interest in this time ending which kind of surprises me.

 

In the above quote, if you are talking historical fiction, we do some of that too. My dh just finished reading To Kill a Mockingbird as we are in the 1930s for history right now, and last September he read Oliver Twist when they were studying industrialization. Now that the kids are older, I am trying to have dh read classics as historical fiction, but in previous years he has read things like Carry on Mr Boditch, Tika Liktac, Tree in the Trail, Little house on the Prairie, etc. Now with kids aged 10 and 13, they do a mix of about 30% fiction and 70% narrative nonfiction, but at younger ages the percentages were reversed.

 

I should also add that we do quite a few documentaries, as in multiple times a week. There are lots at our library and on youtube.

 

Ruth in NZ

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I posted the same question on the K-8 board.  Lori D. answered with a unique idea:

 

Here's a suggestion:

6th = Ancients

7th = cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions part 1 (OR, Eastern Hemisphere)

8th = cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions part 2 (OR, Western Hemisphere -- Europe & Americas)

 

You naturally get quite a bit of history in there when you study the culture on a nation or region of the world. And including the religions includes even more history and culture, and makes for a super foundation to understanding WHY nations/peoples make the choices they did throughout history, for when you move onto high school history.

 

A cultural geography/history study ends itself well to looking at the art, music, games, food, customs, and myths of various cultures and history (a humanities focus) -- which are naturally more interesting aspects of history to most students than lists of dates and battles.  ;)

 

She shared more information about this at this link:

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/512611-please-share-your-history-lineup-for-6th-7th-and-8th-grades/?do=findComment&comment=5610381

 

 

Lori, Thanks so much for your replies on both boards..... subjects and book lists!

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For those who do not use a spine, or use one very loosely (like we do with Ancients which we cannot abide)--where do find lists of your living books/documentaries?

I work part time I find so much of my time is consumed sourcing these. The SOTW activity book is used exclusively for this in my house, for example.

 

I don't spend that much time researching and deciding.  For a few topics, there are choices and I have to look things up.  And for a few topics there's nothing and I have to seek things out.  But for most topics there's only a few books out there anyway so I show up at the library and what they've got is what we use.  Or, at least, what they've got is what we check out.  And then, we get it home and use it or don't.  But I'm lucky enough to have a good enough library that I can be that lazy.  And I know the collection there well enough to know where to look.  I mean, there are tricks to this...  like I know to look at a decade, not a topic for some things, and to look at individual countries for some and general history for others, to check architecture or art or religion or holidays for certain topics, to look for biographies sometimes and not others.  And I already know children's books pretty well, so I know what living books to look for and when there's a series I make a mental note, that sort of thing.  Plus, I know history myself pretty well, so I know what topics I'm planning to cover.

 

I used to do more research, but now I do very little.  The loose spine is usually as much for me as the kids - to remind me what boxes to check off.

 

And because I do so much on the fly, it's probably not a system that can be copied very well, I'm realizing.  I think the next best lazy solution is probably to get the hive to do your research for you.  Because you know we have most of the time. ;)

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I don't spend that much time researching and deciding.  For a few topics, there are choices and I have to look things up.  And for a few topics there's nothing and I have to seek things out.  But for most topics there's only a few books out there anyway so I show up at the library and what they've got is what we use.  Or, at least, what they've got is what we check out.  And then, we get it home and use it or don't.  But I'm lucky enough to have a good enough library that I can be that lazy.  And I know the collection there well enough to know where to look.  I mean, there are tricks to this...  like I know to look at a decade, not a topic for some things, and to look at individual countries for some and general history for others, to check architecture or art or religion or holidays for certain topics, to look for biographies sometimes and not others.  And I already know children's books pretty well, so I know what living books to look for and when there's a series I make a mental note, that sort of thing.  Plus, I know history myself pretty well, so I know what topics I'm planning to cover.

 

I used to do more research, but now I do very little.  The loose spine is usually as much for me as the kids - to remind me what boxes to check off.

 

And because I do so much on the fly, it's probably not a system that can be copied very well, I'm realizing.  I think the next best lazy solution is probably to get the hive to do your research for you.  Because you know we have most of the time. ;)

Thanks so much. Our local library is one room (rural area) but I use the ones in NYC. The issue is I need to know what to put on hold at least ;)

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We are all over the place but get a ton done.  This year I had a 5/6th and 8th grader. 

We read FMoModern Times out-loud (we read Greece -Ren last yr). The kids listened to History of the Medieval World on CD (read outloud last yr). Ds 14 read Gueber's American the Beautiful along with Mills Ancient Israel. We are reading Notgrass America (mostly review, but great pics and dd 11 loves the workbooks) outloud. They've listened to a couple of Henty's on CD and read a ton of historical fiction.

We are also working through MP's Geo II (did I last year). dd 11 is doing "Mapping the World with Art" at co-op.

 

Next yr ds will be a 9th gr. This summer I hope to read HOTAW and HOTRW outloud.

 

I offer this mish-mash for this reason: years ago I had a friend who always had big bucks for homeschool curriculum, did everything orderly and neat. I always felt so inadequate because we weren't doing a 4 yr cycle with all of "the" books etc.

My kids know an incredible amount of history,love it, get it, even with all of the seemingly random-ness to what and when. 

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For 6th and 7th, we did SOTW vol 4 with Joy Hakim's US History.  I added a ton of literature and writing.  Paula's Archives were a huge help coordinating the texts and suggesting additional materials.  It was a wonderful study.

 

8th grade we did World Cultural Geography from PAC.  I added literature, art, architecture, music, food, religion, and anything else that would bring the study alive.  It was not hard to pull together using the library and internet resource.  Again, a wonderful study.  My (then) 11th grader joined us for this course so having another participant gave us great discussions. 

 

Doing World Cultural Geography in 8th set the stage nicely for high school.  This year in 9th we started the cycle over with ancients. 

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I posted the same question on the K-8 board.  Lori D. answered with a unique idea:

 

Here's a suggestion:

6th = Ancients

7th = cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions part 1 (OR, Eastern Hemisphere)

8th = cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions part 2 (OR, Western Hemisphere -- Europe & Americas)

 

You naturally get quite a bit of history in there when you study the culture on a nation or region of the world. And including the religions includes even more history and culture, and makes for a super foundation to understanding WHY nations/peoples make the choices they did throughout history, for when you move onto high school history.

 

A cultural geography/history study ends itself well to looking at the art, music, games, food, customs, and myths of various cultures and history (a humanities focus) -- which are naturally more interesting aspects of history to most students than lists of dates and battles.  ;)

 

She shared more information about this at this link:

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/512611-please-share-your-history-lineup-for-6th-7th-and-8th-grades/?do=findComment&comment=5610381

 

 

Lori, Thanks so much for your replies on both boards..... subjects and book lists!

 

 

Lori, could you recommend anything for the 7th (Eastern Hemisphere) and 8th (Western Hemisphere) grades above?  What are my choices for getting both the cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions done?

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For the middle years, we do history through read alouds, discussion, and classics of the same era. My dh does the reading and he really really likes narrative nonfiction, basically non-fiction that reads more like a story.  This is our list for this year:

 

modern history narrative non-fiction book list- post 2 in thread

 

They discuss as much as the read, and get out maps, and make connections.  Concurrently, my boys read literature of and about the era.  So for the Roaring 20s my older ds read The Great Gatsby, for the victorian era he read Oliver Twist, etc.  Then, he and I discuss how these books act as a commentary of the era and how the era they were written in affects the view point of the author. 

 

We don't use a spine, and don't do output of any kind.  We do no time lines, no primary sources, no outlining, no memory work.

 

Now I am sure that my kids don't know all the names and dates that others might, but boy oh boy do they have the big picture.  They LOVE history, and they can hold their own in any conversation.

 

Ruth in NZ

I'm following a similar plan for the upcoming years. We did this some last year but I didn't have enough books and didn't do a great job of picking out books, this year I hope I've done a little better in planning. This coming year for 5th we're doing Am. History, for 6th we might be doing another year of Am. History (depending on how far we get) or we might do a year of geography and world cultures. I've not planned past that.

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We're reading through K12's Human Odyssey, then will finish up with their American Odyssey. We read a chapter a week, follow rabbit trails where desired, add in a fair amount of documentary watching, and some additonal books (like The Story of Salt, a great little book). The rest of the time, they follow their own interests.

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I am going to be using BJU history in middle school which is Ancient, World, and US history. The student activity manuals look amazing and include outlining, graphic organizers, essay writing, mapping, source documents, etc.  I plan to add in a few historical fiction books along the way and use the Perspective Timeline game as reinforcement of learning the major events and possibly some card games such as Professor Noggins. I am really looking forward to it! 

 

I plan to incorporate some geography throughout the 3 years using MP Review books for memorization of places and names. I've done some cultural geography things in co-ops, so I might save that part for high school geography. 

 

 

The Perspective Timeline game sounded so interesting, I had to look it up. We are finishing up our history cycle and this looks like a perfect way for a fun review! It's now on my wish list at Amazon, will probably be purchasing it for some end of the year fun:) Thanks for mentioning it, I think;)

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Lori, could you recommend anything for the 7th (Eastern Hemisphere) and 8th (Western Hemisphere) grades above?  What are my choices for getting both the cultural/physical geography and comparative world religions done?

 

Well, we pulled together our own from all sorts of resources, much from our local library. I spent a lot of time in advance looking up individual countries in my library's online catalog for things like:

 

- travelogue videos and documentaries

- feature films set in specific countries

- children and teen non-fiction books on specific countries or key people/feature/topic of a country

- children's picture books of myths (often the artwork is done in the cultural style)

- made/ate food from different countries

- played games played from different countries

- listened to music clips of traditional music from different cultures (World Book Encycl. CD, but you can also do online searches)

- literature / classics set in different culture / by authors from different countries

 

We also used an atlas, the World Book Encyclopedia CD, printed outline maps from the National Geographic Xpedition Atlas, and played the free geography games at Sheppard Software.

 

For the comparative religions, again, I pulled together from many resources, and we created our own comparison chart as we went (something like this one). In addition to lots of children's and teen non-fiction books from the library, some websites, we used the Milliken publlishers' The World's Great Religions: Inside _____" series (at a middle school level), and John Bowker's World Religions (grade 8+ level).

 

I'm pretty sure newer options have come out since we did our study, and have probably been discussed on this Board; I just can't think of a specific thread at the moment...

 

 

The only homeschool programs for lit-based World Geography I can think of are either a bit above or a bit below middle school:

- Sonlight (old core 5, more recent core F, and now "grade 5) = Eastern Hemisphere focus (at a gr. 4-6 level) -- or secular Book Shark version

- My Father's World = Eastern Countries and Cultures focus (gr. 4-6 level)

- Heart of Dakota = World Geography (high school)

- Oak Meadow Social Studies = World Geography (1 year); World Religions (1 semester); Middle East (1 semester) (high school)

 

Or, you could go with a textbook for a spine and add lots of items from your library:

- Trail Guide to World Geography = homeschool outline guide (gr. 2-12)

- National Geographic = World Cultures and Geography (gr. 6-7 level)

- Prentice-Hall = World Explorer: People, Places, and Culture (middle school level)

- lots of ideas in this past thread: Middle School (secular) world geography text?? 

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Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously. Are you writing a book? Is that why you have all the awesome book lists and links? Because you are writing a book right now? And the awesome lists are all part of the research? And you are just really nice and share all the info with us even though you will soon be selling a book? That you are writing right now? 

 

Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously... 

 

:D

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Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously. Are you writing a book? Is that why you have all the awesome book lists and links? Because you are writing a book right now? And the awesome lists are all part of the research? And you are just really nice and share all the info with us even though you will soon be selling a book? That you are writing right now? 

 

Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously... 

 

:D

I agree. I need to be filing away these awesome ideas for when we do get to geography and cultures.

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Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously. Are you writing a book? Is that why you have all the awesome book lists and links? Because you are writing a book right now? And the awesome lists are all part of the research? And you are just really nice and share all the info with us even though you will soon be selling a book? That you are writing right now? 

 

Lori, you need to write a book. Seriously... 

 

:D

 

Wow, really mixed messages here. I'm not at all clear on what you're suggesting for me…  :tongue_smilie:  :smilielol5:

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You could team up with SWB and work on the resources lists for WTM v4. I'm serious. There is so much new stuff out there since v3, I'm sure she would need some help.

 

 

LOL. Thanks lewelma, you are very kind and encouraging! :) But all my lists are older (2006-07 school year) than the 3rd. ed. of WTM (2009). Afraid I wouldn't be much help there unless SWB decided to go backwards to time… ;)

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5th-Ancients.  We used the Human Odyssey, in combination with the OUP Egyptians and Greeks

6th-Romans through early middle ages.  We've been using HO and OUP Romans, MA, and a few other books.

7th-Late middle ages through early modern (1850's) and extra US history, using HO, and Hakim's US history to get a bit more US history in there

8th-Modern (1850's-present) and Hakim's US history

 

 

We love history, but Indy would gladly study nothing but ancients if I let him.  :)

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Dd12 started homeschooling in 6th so she did not have a history cycle k-5. We're using Kingfisher World history Encyclopedia, OUP Ancient World and Medieval/Early Modern World, History of US, and lots of biographies and historical fiction from the library. I haven't settled on the books for 20th century world history, yet. We're just going to keep doing the next thing until we're done.

 

High School will look something like this...

 

Grade 9- Geography

Grade 10- Us History

Grade 11- World History

Grade 12- Government/ Economics

 

We're planing to use an umbrella school so she can get an accredited diploma. We get to choose our own curriculums and which year we do what, but we have to cover these topics which are required for college anyway so they're fine with us.

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My daughter started homeschooling in 7th grade.  She covered pre-history to 500AD in seventh, 500AD to 1700AD in eighth, and 1700AD to 2000AD in ninth grade.

 

Her interests in high school also led her to emphasize foreign languages at the expense of history; there were only so many hours in a day! Her high school record looked like this:

9th: World History from 1700 to 2000 (at home, the third year of her chronological sweep through history)
10th: AP US History (out of the home class)
11th: AP Comparative Politics and Government (out of the home class)

You might not classify it as history, but she also did

12th: Art History (quarter long class at the community college)

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I would also be interested in HOW everyone does their history. What is practical and effective.... Not really cute or artsy.

 

 

Here is what I handed to my daughter in 7th grade.  I will list the resources we used in the next post. 

 

 

"History and Reading

 

The plan:

 

To study history chronologically from prehistory to about AD500.

 

The means:

 

We’ll use Hillyer and Huey’s two books Young People’s Story of the Ancient World as well as numerous other books and resources.

 

Typically each week there will be a list of required reading.  There will generally be a novel to be read pertaining to the time period.  There may also be some myths and legends to be read.  There will also be non-fiction books or selections to be read and perhaps a website to visit or a video to view.

 

You will need to locate any places mentioned on the map, in a historical atlas and on the globe (if we obtain one).  Each week you will make two pages for your Book of the Centuries.  These pages should be work you can be proud of!  They should be well planned, edited and neat.  They can be in your best cursive or done on the computer.  All art work should be done with care.  The pages should pertain to the time period being studied.  Each page should be titled.  Pages might cover such topics as:

 

A people

A great man or woman (a ruler, artist, explorer, scientist)

An artifact (tools, buildings, type of writing)

A religion

An event

A discovery or invention

A war or battle

The daily life of a people

A map (route of an explorer, location of a people) 

An imaginary encounter between two historical personae

???

 

You might find information on these topics at home or you may need to do additional research at the library or online. 

 

Maps should include a legend (which may be printed) in addition to the title.

 

In addition to your two pages, you should also note five to ten important dates in your Book of the Centuries."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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To continue from the previous post:

 

First a general note about my list, we're quite liberal so some of the videos on the list as well as a few books (i.e., Gonick's the Cartoon History ...) might not suit all families.   I enlisted my husband to watch all of the videos with my daughter.  It gave them something to enjoy together and also involved my husband in homeschooling.

 

Bear in mind that my daughter was a voracious reader; I suspect that one might happily use far fewer books.  We also were homeschooling on a serious budget our first few years of homeschooling, and so I basically used what I could locate at the library and thrift stores.

 

Recall that this list covers the time period from prehistory to 500AD.  

 

My daughter used the following materials in 7th grade:

 

 

Selections from The Kingfisher Illustrated History of the World by Charlotte Evans et al.

 

The Young People's Story of Our Heritage: The Ancient World, Pre-history to 500BC by V. M. Hillyer and E. G. Huey

 

The Young People's Story of Our Heritage: The Ancient World, 500BC to 500AD by V. M. Hillyer and E. G. Huey

 

A Bone from a Dry Sea by Peter Dickinson

 

Cave of the Moving Shadows by Thomas Milstead

 

Spirit on the Wall by Ann O'Neal Garcia

 

Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw

 

Pharaoh's Daughter by Julius Lester

 

Video:  David Macaulay's World of Ancient Engineering:   Pyramid

 

Black Ships before Troy by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Dateline: Troy by Paul Fleischman

 

Inside the Walls of Troy by Clemence McClaren 

 

The Curse of King Tut by Patricia Netzley

 

The Golden Fleece by Padraic Colum

 

Escape from Egypt by Sonia Levitin

 

Troy by Adele Geras   

 

The Wanderings of Odysseus by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

The Cat of Bubastes by G. A. Henty

 

City of Gold and Other Stories from the Old Testament by Peter Dickinson

 

Gods and Goddesses by John Malam

 

The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone by James Cross Giblin

 

Selections from  Cultural Atlas for Young People:  Ancient Greece by Anton Powell

 

Selections from Then and Now by Stefania and Dominic Perring

 

Selections from Usborne Book of Famous Lives

 

Selections from  Heroines by Rebecca Hazell

 

Selections from A Picturesque Tale of Progress, Volume 2 by Olive Beaupre Miller

 

The Story of the World, History for the Classical Child: Ancient Times by Susan W. Bauer

 

Niko: Sculptor's Apprentice by Isabelle Lawrence

 

How Would You Survive as an Ancient Greek? by Fiona Macdonald

 

Calliope Magazine: Taharqo

 

Calliope Magazine: Ancient Celts

 

Alexander the Great by Peter Chrisp

 

Video: Alexander the Great (The History Makers)

 

Men of Athens by Olivia Coolidge

 

Selections from Mathematicians are People, Too by Luetta and Wilbert Reimer

 

Science in Ancient Greece by Kathlyn Gay

 

Selections from A Day in Old Athens by William S. Davis

 

Your Travel Guide to Ancient Greece by Nancy Day

 

The Librarian who Measured the Earth by Kathryn Lasky

 

The Emperor's Silent Army by Jane O'Connor

 

Selections from Ancient Japan by J. E. Kidder

 

Hannibal's Elephants by Alfred Powers

 

The Story of the Romans by H. A. Guerber

 

Galen: My Life in Imperial Rome by Marissa Moss

 

Caesar's Gallic War by Olivia Coolidge

 

Selections from Ancient Inventions by Peter James and Nick Thorpe

 

Video:  Anthony and Cleopatra (Royal Shakespeare Company, 1974)

 

Videos:  I, Claudius (Volumes 1-7)

 

Augustus Caesar's World by Genevieve Foster

 

City by David Macaulay

 

The Wadjet Eye by Jill Rubalcaba

 

Video:  David Macaulay's World of Ancient Engineering:   Roman City

 

Song for a Dark Queen by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Detectives in Togas by Henry Winterfield

 

Video:  Ancient Mysteries:  Pompeii, Buried Alive

 

The Capricorn Bracelet by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

The Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Selections from Wonders of Ancient Chinese Science by Robert Silverberg

 

The White Stag by Kate Seredy

 

Saint George and the Dragon by Margaret Hodges

 

Selections from The Dark Ages by Tony Gregory

 

Lady Ch'iao Kuo:  Warrior of the South by Laurence Yep

 

The Dancing Bear by Peter Dickinson

 

Video:  Africa (Ancient Civilizations for Children)

 

The Cartoon History of the Universe II, From the Springtime of China to the Fall of Rome by Larry Gonick

 

Regards,
Kareni

 

 

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