Jump to content

Menu

If you were going to reteach yourself...


Recommended Posts

as in, brush up on grammar (getting into the nitty gritty parts of speech), redo all maths, do a history overview, and perhaps redo some sciences, what programs would you use?

 

I graduated all my kids, but it's been a few years since I have really worked through the maths on my own. I've always been strong in grammar, and a pretty good writer, but I'd like to revisit grammar in more detail. I have never been a history fan, but would like to learn it in a more interesting way, and I really want to go back through Chemistry myself as well.

 

I'm considering a return to college, and I just want to be completely refreshed on everything.

 

WWYD?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No advice on the grammar.

For history, I would go with Teaching Company lectures. Very engaging, in depth analysis, can be listened to while driving or doing housework.

For math, *I* personally prefer AoPS - it is the way I would explain concepts to another person, I like the emphasis on thinking over drill, and it radiates joy the way I have not seen from any other math program.

For chemistry, I would get a college text like Chang's General Chemistry and simply work through it, supplementing with Khan academy videos if needed ( I have never found the need to use videos besides textbooks since everything is explained in the text and I just have to take the time to work through it carefully and puzzle out the meaning.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Khan Academy (free website) for myself, to help freshen up my own math so I can better help my high schoolers.

 

I play on Duolingo for Spanish too. (Free website and app)

 

If you like Rod and Staff English I'd probably go with the 8 book. The 9 and 10 levels focus more on writing than grammar.

 

Agreeing with SilverMoon about level 8 of Rod and Staff. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Khan academy for math.  I love SWBs History of... books.  They are thorough and engaging.  I'd definitely pick Analytical Grammar over Rod and Staff both get the job done but AG does it in a more interesting and straight forward way. Science it would depend on how in depth I wanted to go. 

 

As an adult learner, you could probably take any basic college course and get up to speed right away.  I doubt the review you are wanting to do is really necessary.  You might find it worthwhile to audit a class or take a class through a community college or adult learning program first to build your confidence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason I want to do this first is because I travel a good bit. I'd like to do all the refreshing on my own time before I have to commit to being on campus. I'm also hoping it will give me some insight as to what I'd like to study. My previous major was forensic anthropology, and, while forensics still interests me greatly, I doubt I'd go in that direction. I'm not worried about being back in classes, but want everything to really be fresh in my mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

cool! So you're like Bones?

 

;)

 

Haha! Maybe a little...

 

Actually, the forensics professor i had at LSU is very famous for her FACES program. We actually worked on a couple of cases with her back in the day. It was a LONG time ago. I'm getting old.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am self-educating. Right now, I'm using Saxon math, Hake Grammar, and Writing Strands. And reading, reading, reading: whatever I WANT to read, and whatever I can get my hands on without it being a big deal.

 

I keep widening out, and trying to add art, and music, and literature and, and, and. Then I pull back and refocus and do Saxon/Hake/WS and read, read, read.

 

I've been using Spalding's vertical handwriting, and I'm thinking of taking the time to learn a slanted hand, as it's faster to write in traditional slanted cursive than a rounder vertical font.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always been strong in grammar, and a pretty good writer, but I'd like to revisit grammar in more detail.

 

For grammar, I think that a person can learn all they really need from two very short works, and one long one, provided that they are studied very carefully.

 

First, George Orwell's essay, "Politics and the English Language", which does a very good job of explaining why exactly it is important to get into the nitty gritty, and provides the basics of how to do it.

 

Second, E.B. White's revised version of William Strunk's Elements of Style. Although E.B. White is mostly known for his children's stories today, he was once famous for his very sharp writing in The New Yorker. Elements of Style is quite short, and focuses mostly on the "how" portion. It's worth carefully studying -- a person who has internalized its guidelines won't necessarily have any better ideas than they had before, but there will be very few barriers in the transfer of those ideas via text from one person to another.

 

Third (and really only if the first two have left you unsatisfied), H.W. Fowler's The King's English. This is an older book, and deals with British English. It violates one of its own main rules through its age (to illustrate through living examples), but it explains in greater detail what George Orwell and Strunk & White were trying to say, and can be a valuable resource as long as the first two have been carefully digested first (to make it clear which parts are still useful, and which parts are now outdated.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the grammar input. I actually have Elements of Style. It was required reading for all my kiddos. I guess I need to practice what I preach. ;-p

 

My biggest issue is math, although I do like the looks of AoPS. I was actually just considering TT for an Algebra II review (just testing and covering material I need help with), then the pre-calc. I have access to the Algebra II. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second the recommendation for Analytical Grammar. It's clear and concise.

 

For math, I am going to give the programs we already own a try, in this order: AoPS Algebra, TT Alg. 2, Saxon Alg. 2. If none of those click after a few lessons or if it feels like I am in over my head, I'm going to go back to Alg. 1 and use Horizons.

 

I'm getting a lot out of using WttW with my son. With the syllabus, it's a great literature review.

 

For Sciences, I recommend looking at the Beginnings Publishing programs.

 

You could learn a lot of history, science and literature by watching some of The Great Courses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Great Courses have been playing through our house for the last year. Right now I am listening to the History of England from King Arthur to the Tudors. I listen while I do dishes, sew, sweep and straighten. It is just beyond fascinating. So much I never appreciated before. Both The Iliad and the Odyssey were equally fantastic. I am taking on the Aeneid in September. More than anything, I am realizing that mentally I am in a different space that I was when I did my first go around of college. Try new things you never thought you would have liked before. I am amazed at how much more I am enjoying Latin and Spanish as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...