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mom2myboys
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What do you love about it?

What kinds of kids does it work for?

How does it fit in with WTM method or is it completely different? 

What about a reluctant/struggling writer? 

How do you do this program on a tiny budget? 

 

 

I am going through their website now, but want to hear from the Hive as well. Thanks for any insights you can provide. Feel free to point me to other places where this was discussed if I missed them. Thanks. 

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What do you love about it?

What kinds of kids does it work for?

How does it fit in with WTM method or is it completely different? 

What about a reluctant/struggling writer? 

How do you do this program on a tiny budget? 

 

 

I am going through their website now, but want to hear from the Hive as well. Thanks for any insights you can provide. Feel free to point me to other places where this was discussed if I missed them. Thanks. 

 

I love nearly everything about it personally.  I love the flexibility of her methods and of the timetable for kids to learn.  I love that it's a routine, not a prescription.  I love many of the "fun" elements of it - writing projects, freewriting, poetry teas, etc.

 

I think elements of it can work for most kids and that most people teaching writing could get something out of reading The Writer's Jungle, even if it's not adopting her whole method.  I think it probably works best for kids at each end of the writing spectrum - kids to love to write and write all the time (because it encourages that yet helps build skills and voice) and kids who hate to write and are reluctant writers (because it builds their confidence and makes writing feel safe).  I think it probably works least for kids who are serious parts to whole learners - kids who need everything broken down into tiny steps.  BW can do that (it's flexible and there's a lot of partnership in her writing approach that can include a lot of good scaffolding), but the overall approach is so whole to parts that I think there are probably kids out there who may need more structured baby steps than BW is really offering.

 

There are many overlaps with WTM writing and many completely different things.  Both have copywork, dictation and oral narration as really important components and both rely on those in the early grades to teach writing instead of something like journaling with invented spelling or writing reports at an early age.  BW's copywork and dictation is more prepared than WTM's, but not hugely different.  BW's narration is really different IMO though.  WTM narration is focused on short summary.  BW narration is focused on retelling and is used much more broadly in different contexts.  And, of course, then there are all the things about BW that are just different from WTM completely, such as using freewriting.  Overall, I would say that WTM writing is about breaking down the process more (parts to whole again) and teaching writing from the ground up but BW is about learning writing more naturally from the world around you (again that whole to parts thing) and turning oral voice into strong written voice.

 

I think it's great for a reluctant writer.  Just reading her stuff will make you feel calmer and like you have plenty of time (because you do!) and will give you ways to feel like you're working on writing without it being a workbook with proscribed assignments.

 

On a budget!  Well, several things...  All her things are on HSBC with a good discount.  TWJ you just buy once, so even though it's really expensive, it's a text for you, that you can return to over and over.  Of course, I think anyone on a budget it going to think, but what if it doesn't work.  You can read a ton of her method without TWJ - follow her on Twitter/Facebook, join the Facebook group, subscribe to her daily writing tips email, read her blog.  That's all free and there's a ton of information in there.  Also, if your kids are the right age, I personally think that the newer supplements Jot It Down, Partnership Writing, and Faltering Ownership (that one should be out by the end of August), are great - they're more specific, more laid out, shorter and less expensive.  They're a great way to figure out if BW is for you.  Also, I would say don't get the Arrow - or just get one or two Arrows to see how to do it.  We almost never use the Arrow.  I think it's a bit overpriced and while it's nice to have all that done for you, it's not that hard to choose your own copywork/dictation really.

 

Good luck.  :)

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Much of the content is available on the website and through her Yahoo group. That said, you can get Bravewriter at Homeschool Buyer's Coop for 50% off. I love the philosophy of The Writer's Jungle, and its many tips, description of stages of growth... Having that in the back of my head really helps me be realistic with what I expect from my daughter.

 

But it's more a suggested routine with gentle elements than a "plan," if you're looking for a plan. We're just trying the Arrow for the first time, and I feel like it could be a little more fleshed out to be more complete since it uses great books, some good discussion questions, etc. But what it does - copy work/narration help, literary devices, writing ideas - it does well. I supplement with Google for more discussion ideas, etc :) I do think it's helping us get into a good routine. I'm sure, though, you could DIY with ideas from TWJ....

 

Hopefully someone with more experience will chime in for you, or perhaps there are other similar threads :)

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On a budget! Well, several things... All her things are on HSBC with a good discount. TWJ you just buy once, so even though it's really expensive, it's a text for you, that you can return to over and over. Of course, I think anyone on a budget it going to think, but what if it doesn't work. You can read a ton of her method without TWJ - follow her on Twitter/Facebook, join the Facebook group, subscribe to her daily writing tips email, read her blog. That's all free and there's a ton of information in there. Also, if your kids are the right age, I personally think that the newer supplements Jot It Down, Partnership Writing, and Faltering Ownership (that one should be out by the end of August), are great - they're more specific, more laid out, shorter and less expensive. They're a great way to figure out if BW is for you. Also, I would say don't get the Arrow - or just get one or two Arrows to see how to do it. We almost never use the Arrow. I think it's a bit overpriced and while it's nice to have all that done for you, it's not that hard to choose your own copywork/dictation really.

I bought TWJ in addition to the Arrow and PW so it wasn't cheap and I hated (loathe?) it. In hindsight, what I wish I would have done is what farrar suggests above. Skip TWJ and Arrow and buy one of the newer supplements. Subscribe to the blog (I had done that, too). Most everything you need to know in order to implement BW could be found between the blog and one of the newer supplements. You'll save a lot of money this way while figuring out if BW will work for you and your family. If it works, and you become one of those annoying Bw evangelists, awesome. Buy TWJ then and celebrate your new found love. Do not buy several components beforehand off HSBC because there is no resale value in ebooks and no way to recoup your costs if it doesn't work.

 

It is not a one-size fits all method and it will not work for all reluctant writers. I know Julie thinks it will (and said as much on her blog the other day - totally forgot I was still subscribed), but I think going in with a more tempered set of expectations will help. It didn't work for mine which really shouldn't surprise me in the slightest because he's a lot like me. I love the idea of BW, but it took actually trying to implement it with my kid before I was able to really figure out that I hate the loosey-goosey kinds of writer's workshop-y stuff even though I get all caught up in the romance of it. BW is filled with the sorts of things that make me freeze up as a writer - I know that now.

 

Some reluctant writers will need far more structure. Some really will need the sort of things BW types think are stilted, stifling, and formulaic. That's ok. There are as many types of writers as there are writing curriculum - it's why there are so many.

 

So, yes, give it a try, you never know...it may just be a good fit. :0)

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I love nearly everything about it personally.  I love the flexibility of her methods and of the timetable for kids to learn.  I love that it's a routine, not a prescription.  I love many of the "fun" elements of it - writing projects, freewriting, poetry teas, etc.

 

I think elements of it can work for most kids and that most people teaching writing could get something out of reading The Writer's Jungle, even if it's not adopting her whole method.  I think it probably works best for kids at each end of the writing spectrum - kids to love to write and write all the time (because it encourages that yet helps build skills and voice) and kids who hate to write and are reluctant writers (because it builds their confidence and makes writing feel safe).  I think it probably works least for kids who are serious parts to whole learners - kids who need everything broken down into tiny steps.  BW can do that (it's flexible and there's a lot of partnership in her writing approach that can include a lot of good scaffolding), but the overall approach is so whole to parts that I think there are probably kids out there who may need more structured baby steps than BW is really offering.

 

There are many overlaps with WTM writing and many completely different things.  Both have copywork, dictation and oral narration as really important components and both rely on those in the early grades to teach writing instead of something like journaling with invented spelling or writing reports at an early age.  BW's copywork and dictation is more prepared than WTM's, but not hugely different.  BW's narration is really different IMO though.  WTM narration is focused on short summary.  BW narration is focused on retelling and is used much more broadly in different contexts.  And, of course, then there are all the things about BW that are just different from WTM completely, such as using freewriting.  Overall, I would say that WTM writing is about breaking down the process more (parts to whole again) and teaching writing from the ground up but BW is about learning writing more naturally from the world around you (again that whole to parts thing) and turning oral voice into strong written voice.

 

I think it's great for a reluctant writer.  Just reading her stuff will make you feel calmer and like you have plenty of time (because you do!) and will give you ways to feel like you're working on writing without it being a workbook with proscribed assignments.

 

On a budget!  Well, several things...  All her things are on HSBC with a good discount.  TWJ you just buy once, so even though it's really expensive, it's a text for you, that you can return to over and over.  Of course, I think anyone on a budget it going to think, but what if it doesn't work.  You can read a ton of her method without TWJ - follow her on Twitter/Facebook, join the Facebook group, subscribe to her daily writing tips email, read her blog.  That's all free and there's a ton of information in there.  Also, if your kids are the right age, I personally think that the newer supplements Jot It Down, Partnership Writing, and Faltering Ownership (that one should be out by the end of August), are great - they're more specific, more laid out, shorter and less expensive.  They're a great way to figure out if BW is for you.  Also, I would say don't get the Arrow - or just get one or two Arrows to see how to do it.  We almost never use the Arrow.  I think it's a bit overpriced and while it's nice to have all that done for you, it's not that hard to choose your own copywork/dictation really.

 

Good luck.   :)

 

:iagree:

I usually suggest that people sign up for the free tips and read through her blog before buying anything.  She gives so much info and it's easy to get a feel for what it's all about. I use a lot of the email tips for daily writing activities. 

 

For what it's worth, we weren't thrilled with The Arrow either. 

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For me, TWJ was a teacher-training manual.  I loved it and learned a lot from it. 

 

The book (as well as the website, blog, etc.) gives a lot of tools: copywork, narration, dictation, freewrites, revision process, partnership writing, poetry tea, etc, etc.  I think TWJ is ideal for a parent who wants inspiration but does not want to be tied down to a particular schedule/implementation/workbook. 

 

I got a 5-pack bundle of the Arrow and did not feel like it was worth the money.  Similar feeling with the Wand.  I do own and like Jot It Down and Partnership Writing, but in retrospect, TWJ was probably enough. 

 

I have now dropped all writing curricula and consider us to be a "BW Family," mainly because I can't think of another way to describe our LA.  BW strikes me as being a sort of modernized CM approach. 

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I really appreciate everyone's thoughtful responses. Thank you! I knew I came to the right place for help. :)

 

I am working through the BW site and blog now. I think I will start there and try to incorporate a few of the lifestyle things and see what happens. 

 

Is TWJ typically on HSBC often or will I miss it if I do not grab it now? 

 

Do you think I could use some of the BW techniques to add to our WWE/WWS or would that be too much?

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