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Help me create a health class


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I'm trying to pull together a health class for DS15, but I'm looking for a little help. 

 

First, what topics should be included?  I'm thinking obviously:

  • nutrition - primarily alternative rather than the standard food pyramid stuff
  • exercise
  • stress management
  • mental health
  • alternative health practices 
  • first aid
  • sex ed./reproduction
  • diseases
  • drugs/alcohol
  • global health practices

Is there anything I'm missing?

 

Some Teaching Company Courses I'm considering:

Stress and Your Body

Mind-Body Medicine

Physiology and Fitness

Nutrition Made Clear

The Science of Natural Healing

 

What I would like to compile is a list of books that would fit into a course that is slightly less main-stream than what you would typically find in a high school health class.  I need about 15 titles on a variety of topics.  Any favorites? 

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A few interesting topics that dd covered this year that you might not have included are:

Old age/death/grief

Accident prevention/First aid/CPR

Environment and health

 

There was also quite a bit of anatomy/physiology - how your body works stuff. I think most of the rest would fall under your categories.

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Your family's medical history -- any diseases, allergies, birth defects, etc. your kids should know about when they have to give their medical history to a new doctor.  My mom had a number of issues that I was vaguely aware of as a child/teen, but I have a hard time explaining them in the doctor's office.

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Your family's medical history -- any diseases, allergies, birth defects, etc. your kids should know about when they have to give their medical history to a new doctor. My mom had a number of issues that I was vaguely aware of as a child/teen, but I have a hard time explaining them in the doctor's office.

Ooh. That's one I hadn't thought of before. Thanks.

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Allergies -- how to use an EpiPen, how to read food labels for allergic ingredients, for instance.

What to do if a friend is harming him/herself, or is being pressured for sex, or the like -- should be fairly obvious, but maybe some roleplaying or discussion would be in order so that the kid feels comfortable with getting a friend to an adult.

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I used the Oak Meadow Heath course for both my ds and dd.  I really liked the course and the books they had to read with it.

-Health: Making Life Choices by Glencoe McGraw-Hill  (Main Text) 

-Human Anatomy Coloring Book by Margaret Matt

-In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollen

-Spark:  The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by John J. Ratey, M.D.

 

I also had them read several chapters out of Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating by Walter Willett, MD. This is an excellent book that really takes the Government's "Pyramid" and explains why it is an absolute mess.

 

I also required a CPR class, a Baby Sitting Certification Class, a short paper on the effects of altitude on the body, fitness, and exercise since we live at high altitude, and a paper researching our food industry.  

 

We watched several documentaries on Netflix regarding topics such as food choices and the US diet, drug use, correlation between our environment and our health i.e. how our food is being grown, the human body, Infectious diseases

 

They put together their own fitness plans and kept logs of their progress.  They used:

Weight Training Fundamentals by David Sandler

The Official United States Navy Seal Workout

Relax Into the Stretch by Pavel Tsatsouline

 

The course also recommends supplemental books if there is an interest in a particular subject:

Food and Diet

Real Food: What to Eat and Why by Nina Planck

Nourishing Traditions:  The Cookbook That Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and The Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon

Food Inc.: Mendel to Monsanto- The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest by Peter Pringle

The 3 Season Diet: Eat the Way Nature Intended: Lose Weight, Beat Food Cravings, and Get Fit by John Douillard

What to Eat by Marion Bestle

Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health by Marion Nestle

Integrative Nutrition by Joshua Rosenthal

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal by Eric Schlosser

The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia: A Comprehensive Resource for Healthy Eating by Rebecca Wood

Healing

The Power to Heal: Ancient Arts & Modern Medicine by Philip Moffitt

Ayurveda: The Science of Self-Healing by Dr. Vasant Lad

Energy Medicine: Balancing Your Body's Energies for Optimal Health, Joy, and Vitality by Donna Eden

The Complete Illustrated Guide to Shiatsu: The Japanese Healing Art of Touch for Health and Fitness by Elaine Liechti

Yoga as Medicine by Timothy McCall

Fitness

Chi Running: A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running by Danny Dreyer

Born to Run:  A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall

In Fitness and in Health by Dr. Philip Maffetone

Stretching by Bob Anderson

Woman's Health

Our Bodies, Ourselves: A New Edition for a New Era by Boston Woman's Health Book Collective

Woman's Bodies, Women's Wisdom:  Creating Physical and Emotional Health and Healing by Christine Northrup

Spiritual Health

The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel

Full Catastrophe Living:  Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness by Jon Kabat-Zinn

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My oldest (dd, 21) and I were talking this morning about health class in high school vs. middle school and what was most helpful for her.

 

She made the point that there were a lot of subjects to cover and sometimes an information overload. She and her classmates liked some of the movies shone, not because they made class easier, but because they made long-term consequences easier to see. As parents, we can talk until we are blue in the face about consequences, but it is developmentally difficult for kids at this stage to look down the road and analyze possible points of impact.

 

I'll see if I can get a list of movies, if you are interested.

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My oldest (dd, 21) and I were talking this morning about health class in high school vs. middle school and what was most helpful for her.

 

She made the point that there were a lot of subjects to cover and sometimes an information overload. She and her classmates liked some of the movies shone, not because they made class easier, but because they made long-term consequences easier to see. As parents, we can talk until we are blue in the face about consequences, but it is developmentally difficult for kids at this stage to look down the road and analyze possible points of impact.

 

I'll see if I can get a list of movies, if you are interested.

Yes, absolutely! DS tends to connect better to things that he sees or hears rather than reading.

 

As to the information overload, I'm actually planning to do the course in bits over the next three years in order to avoid that overload and introduce things more in depth as they are relevant.

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Thank you for posting this!

 

I am actually taking a Health class myself this semester because it is required for my graduation. In going through this class, though, I have realized that their are many topics I really should cover with dss in highschool. Neither of my ds's want to take it at the community college because they don't want to 'use up' any of the units they are allowed there which means we'll need to put something together ourselves. This thread just helped me get started! :-)

 

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My oldest (dd, 21) and I were talking this morning about health class in high school vs. middle school and what was most helpful for her.

 

She made the point that there were a lot of subjects to cover and sometimes an information overload. She and her classmates liked some of the movies shone, not because they made class easier, but because they made long-term consequences easier to see. As parents, we can talk until we are blue in the face about consequences, but it is developmentally difficult for kids at this stage to look down the road and analyze possible points of impact.

 

I'll see if I can get a list of movies, if you are interested.

 

One of the documentaries the kids and I watched was on the effects of meth.  It was extremely impactful.  I did not make a note of the name of it, because it was one we just stumbled across while I was looking up a different show, but it was raw and powerful.  

 

We also watched one on women trafficking. I am hoping to have dd (15) take a self-defense class soon.  That could be another subject to cover in "health".

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My oldest (dd, 21) and I were talking this morning about health class in high school vs. middle school and what was most helpful for her.

 

She made the point that there were a lot of subjects to cover and sometimes an information overload. She and her classmates liked some of the movies shone, not because they made class easier, but because they made long-term consequences easier to see. As parents, we can talk until we are blue in the face about consequences, but it is developmentally difficult for kids at this stage to look down the road and analyze possible points of impact.

 

I'll see if I can get a list of movies, if you are interested.

 

I would love a movie list if you can get it. :-) Thanks Lisa!

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My oldest (dd, 21) and I were talking this morning about health class in high school vs. middle school and what was most helpful for her.

 

She made the point that there were a lot of subjects to cover and sometimes an information overload. She and her classmates liked some of the movies shone, not because they made class easier, but because they made long-term consequences easier to see. As parents, we can talk until we are blue in the face about consequences, but it is developmentally difficult for kids at this stage to look down the road and analyze possible points of impact.

 

I'll see if I can get a list of movies, if you are interested.

 

Yes, please! I would love a list of resources as well.

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safety: water, fire, etc.

personal safety: walking to car in parking lot type safety, talking on cell phone and walking alone in the park, riding in back of pickups, etc.

 

I suppose under nutrition, you will do suppliments, vitamins, etc.  So much out there to cover!

 

So many health books also cover dating or courtship.  I tend to think of those topics more as interpersonal relationships, but they certainly could be covered under health. 

 

importance of good habits and wise choices now that will affect him as he grows into an adult

 

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