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Looking for advice on Faber piano adventures


Kipling
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I am teaching my kids piano. I started with Bastien piano books because they were recommended by a piano teacher (and they are what I used). However, I am considering switching to Faber Piano adventures. If you have any experience with the Faber books, can you answer my questions: What ages are the accelerated books designed for? My oldest is 10.5 yo and finishing Bastien level 1. Should I switch her to the Faber book 2a or the accelerated book (and if so, should I do accelerated book 1 or 2)? I'm hoping to find the series in a local music store to look through them, but I thought I'd ask for advice first.

Thanks!

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I think the accelerated books are for older beginners.

 

I don't know where Bastien level 1 ends up so it's hard to recommend which Faber book to start up on. If you let me know what is covered by the end of your current book, I'll see if I can help. Faber does cover some concepts that many other beginning piano books don't.

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Piano Adventures moves fairly quickly, and the older beginners book moves very fast. For a student younger than 12 or 13 I would think the older beginners book would be overwhelming.

 

A new series called "Succeeding at the Piano" was published a few years ago. I used that (Lesson and Theory books) with a student recently and really liked it. The pedagogy is solid and there are fewer extra books necessary to fill it out (Faber has Lesson, Theory, Technique, tons of performance books...). It also includes information about classical composers and more classical melodies as a basis for practice pieces.

 

HTH

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I think the accelerated books are for older beginners.

 

I don't know where Bastien level 1 ends up so it's hard to recommend which Faber book to start up on. If you let me know what is covered by the end of your current book, I'll see if I can help. Faber does cover some concepts that many other beginning piano books don't.

She has covered keys of C, F, and G; flats, sharps, and naturals; whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes & rests; and some terminology such as allegro, ritardando, DC al Fine, legato, staccato, etc.

 

Piano Adventures moves fairly quickly, and the older beginners book moves very fast. For a student younger than 12 or 13 I would think the older beginners book would be overwhelming.

 

 

Thank you!  This is very helpful.

 

Thank you ladies!  I appreciate all the help I can get.  I feel comfortable enough with my playing ability to teach my kids piano for a couple more years, but since I'm not a piano teacher, I don't have a lot of resources or experience to rely on for choosing materials.

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I second that Piano Adventures moves quickly. I tried the accelerated version with an older student once and found that we had to do a lot of supplementation to slow it down. It really moves quickly. I'd stick with Bastien if I were you unless you really can't stand it. I feel like you always sort of loose ground whenever you switch things up. If you do switch, I'd start at a lower level and call it review just because they all cover things in different ways.

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