Jump to content

Menu

Most complete math program? Recommendations?


Indian summer
 Share

Recommended Posts

I keep reading on the forums that one or another math program isn't complete. Is there a consensus on which program(s) do cover all of the important stuff? I have no trouble teaching math concepts, but I'm not sure I'd spot concepts missing from a program on my own. I wouldn't necessarily recognize that a program is incomplete. So I need help with this.

 

We have been using JUMP but I find it doesn't offer enough practice of each concept. However, the full Jump program might be fine (we've been using JUMP at Home supplement). We've been supplementing with Khan.

 

I wish I could buy one program that we could stick with year after year that gives the kids lots of practice and ensures mastery of concepts including lots of word problems.

 

I also prefer a program that goes by grade rather than topic. Where I live we don't do a seperate course called algebra or geometry etc. we just do grade level math, including those topics and other math mixed in, if that makes sense.

 

My kids are going into grades 3-8 in the fall, if that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If something were "complete" there wouldn't be time to complete it.

:)

 

Well, I guess I should have qualified complete with something like in a grade level appropriate sort of way. I get that homeschoolers generally aren't married to the idea of grade levels either, so maybe I should qualify that too. Lol!

 

Maybe I shouldn't try typing out stuff on Sunday morning. I'm hoping someone can decifer what I'm trying to get at.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Singapore math meet your description. and, their middle school is integrated math rather than break down to geometry/algebra..

 

DS used SM 3-6 and even though we switch to AOPS , we still use SM math (NEM now discontinued but there is Discovery Math) as review. LOTS of practice and word problems. DD started 1A and working on 4A now

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If something were "complete" there wouldn't be time to complete it.

That's ridiculous.

 

The problem is the homeschool-generated curricula that don't correlate to test standards.  If you go with a standard published curriculum (BJU, Saxon, etc.) you're hitting everything.  People also have their aspirations about what they think math ought to be, which leads to supplementing.  Sometimes they're dealing with SN, where they might need something with unusual amounts of conceptual instruction and a spiral approach (not typically found together in one curriculum).  Situations just vary.  

 

If you want normal and grade leveled, go to a major publisher and be done with it.  BJU is very strong right now, with the new editions, and Singapore has their new standards editions.  RightStart doesn't go through all the grades, but they're very strong and do hit all the standards for testing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would consider MEP because you can get material all the way through quite advanced high school and there is not a division by branch of mathematics. There are not tons of word problems, but there are some. You could just buy a Singapore CWP volume to supplement, I think. You can see the whole thing online for free, so you can make up your mind without a financial investment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I keep reading on the forums that one or another math program isn't complete. Is there a consensus on which program(s) do cover all of the important stuff? I have no trouble teaching math concepts, but I'm not sure I'd spot concepts missing from a program on my own. I wouldn't necessarily recognize that a program is incomplete. So I need help with this.

 

We have been using JUMP but I find it doesn't offer enough practice of each concept. However, the full Jump program might be fine (we've been using JUMP at Home supplement). We've been supplementing with Khan.

 

I wish I could buy one program that we could stick with year after year that gives the kids lots of practice and ensures mastery of concepts including lots of word problems.

 

I also prefer a program that goes by grade rather than topic. Where I live we don't do a seperate course called algebra or geometry etc. we just do grade level math, including those topics and other math mixed in, if that makes sense.

 

My kids are going into grades 3-8 in the fall, if that helps.

 

Someone might refer to a program as being incomplete because it's missing topics, or it doesn't have enough review for their particular student, or not enough practice for their particular student, or not enough development of a concept before it teaches the algorithm/procedure or the style of the instruction isn't sufficiently suited to the student's learning needs.  I would first and foremost consider your students' strengths and weaknesses in choosing a program.

 

If you like JUMP (I'm not familiar with it) but just need more practice, extra practice is typically not hard to supplement.  Khan instruction tends to lean heavily toward the procedural, so it's good for going over algorithms and for drill/practice but not so good for concept instruction, if that is important to you.  Word problem supplements are out there also (e.g. Singapore's Challenging Word Problems are by grade level).

 

If it's the juggling of all your different resources that has you down, you might also look at MM's "light blue" grade-level series, which has a decent amount of word problems.  As Elizabeth said, most major publishers will have all the topics by grade level.

 

On secondary (high school, 9th grade and up) level math, there are a few integrated publishers if that is what you would prefer (e.g., Singapore's Discovering Mathematics, Saxon).  Traditionally, the sequence is algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, precalc.  I would choose high school math very carefully - spend time reading lots of threads over on the high school board.  Note that "8th grade math" is usually the last level prior to algebra 1.  Some programs call the last level prior to algebra as "prealgebra," so a prealgebra text would also do for 8th.  There are a number of threads on prealgebra options on the Logic board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My statement was not ridiculous. The AVERAGE mom on these boards thinks "complete" is using 3-4 curricula. That is a LOT of work. More work than most people have time to complete. So even if someone sold something "complete" in ONE package, it would be such a HUGE book that most families wouldn't have time to complete it. The reason so many curricula are not "complete" is that the author was trying to triage so much information into about 36x5 lessons. 

 

My statement was maybe an oversimplification and meant to be funny more than all that helpful, but it's not ridiculous. For me to have said anything all that different would be like Ellie dropping Spalding recommendations. :lol:

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would consider MEP because you can get material all the way through quite advanced high school and there is not a division by branch of mathematics. There are not tons of word problems, but there are some. You could just buy a Singapore CWP volume to supplement, I think. You can see the whole thing online for free, so you can make up your mind without a financial investment.

:iagree:

 

I've been using MEP and my DD really likes it.  When we get further along I'll make a decision regarding more word problems or not.  We also use the Bedtime Math app and that has fun word problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a math person at all. But why isn't anyone mentioning Math Mammoth?! There was a thread on TWTM that extolled the virtues of MM so we moved to it. We're doing it now. It looks great.

 

I hope I made the right decision. We moved from Teaching Textbooks -- because everyone said that it was too light.

 

Alley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a math person at all. But why isn't anyone mentioning Math Mammoth?! There was a thread on TWTM that extolled the virtues of MM so we moved to it. We're doing it now. It looks great.

 

I hope I made the right decision. We moved from Teaching Textbooks -- because everyone said that it was too light.

 

Alley

Just to make you laugh (or cry), we moved the other way and found our test scores went UP.  :D   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saxon, BJUP, R&S, Horizons, Making Math Meaningful, Moving With Math are all "complete" math courses. We could probably include Ray's, Strayer Upton, and others. Personally, *I* would have stuck with TT if my dc liked it, because although some say it's too "light," there are plenty of others whose dc have used it with good results, IRL math knowledge as well as good test scores.

 

If you stick with one publisher, your dc are going to get everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The AVERAGE mom on these boards thinks "complete" is using 3-4 curricula.

 

I highly doubt that. I think the AVERAGE mom on this board uses one math curricula. There are a small amount using multiple curricula, and that's usually with kids who go through math quickly, so they really do have time to use more than one.

 

It's not unusual to use a few little supplements here and there for fun or to add to the instruction, but again, that's usually with kids who are ahead in math. If a kid is struggling to complete their Saxon lesson, you're not going to see people suggest they add in LoF, Zaccaro, and Singapore CWP. If the kid is bored with their Saxon lesson, then yes, it might be suggested to add something else to break up the monotony. There's nothing wrong with that either. Teach the child math, not the curriculum. There's nothing wrong with pulling from multiple resources. Most people are not lining up 3 different math programs and going through the same topic in each one. They're usually using bits and pieces of each as they see fit, just like you might use bits and pieces of different writing curricula to teach writing. What's wrong with that? I do think math is more systematic and does benefit from having one spine program that is followed for the most part in the elementary years (high school math is different, unless you're using integrated math, in which case you'd want to stay with the same one for scope and sequence purposes). If someone is using Math Mammoth, Singapore CWP, and Life of Fred, they're not using 3 complete curricula... They're using one spine and a couple supplements, which they may or may not use all of, depending on the child. I have one child using 2 full curricula right now (the other two are using only 1). Both are above his grade level, so they don't need to be finished in a year. One is much harder and further ahead, so I go slower in that one (but it's fun, and he ASKS to do it), while the other is boring drill. This child has really benefited from the combo, because he needs the repetition, but he also needs the deeper problem solving. And frankly, the deeper program keeps him interested, whereas the boring program is, well, boring. But again, he's ahead in math, so it doesn't really matter what pace we go. I go at his pace and provide what he needs. It's called teaching. My oldest is doing quite well with one program that is providing him what he needs. If I see that he needs some boring drill on a topic (happened earlier in the book), I pull out a different book and let him practice in that for a bit. Haven't had to do that in a while, but it's always an option. Again, it's called teaching. He's supposed to be learning math, not finishing a book. He'll spend 1.5 years in the book he's doing. That's ok.

 

To the OP: Most curricula are complete. There are the normal ones, such as Saxon, A Beka, Horizons, BJU, etc. There are the Asian math ones such as Singapore, Math Mammoth, and others. They're complete. Teaching Textbooks is even complete. I mean, what do you define as complete? Getting a kid enough math to get into college? They can all do that. There are definitely differences in the amount of drill or problem solving or other such things included, but they're complete. They teach the 4 operations and the basic things that public school students usually do with them. Some programs go beyond that, but not every kid needs that. Some kids only need a basic college prep math, and some kids need deeper math.

 

As far as integrated math goes... Singapore DM, Galore Park, MEP, and some public textbooks are integrated. I think some Saxon books are also, though not quite the same as the others, I suspect. All of those are complete.

 

Each publisher provides a complete program, but you as a teacher have to decide what your child needs. Maybe your child needs a lot of built in drill. Then you'd select a program that has that (or add it in via any number of free drill websites, games, etc.). Maybe your child needs very little drill and needs more depth and problem solving. Then you select a program for that. But overall, you teach your child, not someone else's child.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...