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Latin & Greek: overkill?


Jerico
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We are doing song school Latin 1 next year (2nd grade with a k'er tagging along). I was looking at Greek alphabet code cracker because I thought it would be neat to tie in with history (ancient Greece and Rome- veritas press). Would that be okay? If we loved both could we continue with both? (Ssl 2 & ssg 1)? Or are you supposed to pick 1 of cap's great language programs?

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We do Latin. I'm using the Greek alphabet code cracker with my 2nd grader this year because I had it (I can't remember why I bought it awhile ago but I'd never used it). I thought it might be fun when we studied Ancient Greece and he liked the idea of doing something his brother had never done. Turns out he loves it and think it's one of the more fun things we're doing. He hates school in general but by doing the Greek he's discovered that one thing he does think is really interesting is different languages. It's really kind of a fun extra so I say, sure do it. If it's too much, you can stop.

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Just Code Cracker would compliment history just fine. It doesn't even fill a month.

Personally I would not start a new language one year after a gentle introduction to the first. The standard recommendation is usually two fairly sturdy years of one before adding another.

 

I believe you, SilverMoon, that this is a standard recommendation; but do you know WHY?  We've not had trouble with two languages, and I recall (vaguely!) various threads to the effect that languages are not often confounded with each other.  Occasionally A. does try to say the Latin "non" for Spanish "no" at the beginning of our Spanish, but that's the only confusion we've had ...

 

In terms of overall workload, I can see a concern esp. for a WTM-ish elementary child.

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It's not overkill as long as you have a long range plan.  When my son was in his 3rd year of GReek using Elementary Greek 2 by Christine Gatchell, it was a huge commitment.  It takes approximately 45 minutes per day of time to do the book work, study the charts, (which the best way to do is to actually fill out blank charts until you get it right), practice the vocab cards, chant the declensions.  The Middle School Greek course he will be taking next year says that it is a 45 minute per day commitment, plus a 90 minute class time (I think that's twice per week.) 

 

Your son's brain can handle it.  I have a niece and nephew that are trilingual from birth.  

 

However, that doesn't mean that you have the time and tenacity to keep that commitment.

 

If I were you I would start with Latin and then try adding Greek in a few years.  If you do, and you use a good program from CAP or Memoria or EG, you will obviously not need English Grammar in which case that does free up some of your teaching time.  

 

Hope this helps.

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My son decided to add Ancient Greek next year, and we are already gearing up for the time commitment. In our family we follow the two year rule mentioned by SilverMoon. After two years of reading English, he could start Spanish. After two years of Spanish, he started Latin. Two solid years of Latin, and he added Greek. In two years he is hoping to add Japenese. The only issue that I have heard about learning both Latin and Greek simultaneously is one being predictable and the other being arbitrary. Latin is a very predictable language. There are rules, and they are followed. However, Greek is all about various exceptions to the rules. This can sometimes cause glitches with some students. I do not have first hand experience; just trying to figure out what I am in for with my linguistically focused kid.

Song school is such a gentle introduction it might not matter. Much like how middle school is all about exposing kids to a whole slew of topics then specializing in high school, you could expose your kids to stacks of languages and then ask them which they were interested in specializing in. I would not expect the retention to be very high, though.

It depends on what you are after. Is it exposure or retention that is the goal?

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Excellent advice! I honestly did not think that far down the road. I have not done language studies myself so I want my children to have exposure to see what interests them. I could not remember what was in WTM as I do not own a copy.

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