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Beginning lit analysis


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Dd will be in 5th next year, somewhat accelerated. In the past, we have done some discussion- based lit analysis, similar to what is described in Deconstructing Penguins. We have also worked through level 4 of MCT's poetry curriculum. This year we will have worked through the first half of WWS as well, so we'll be getting to the lit analysis assignments in that program this coming fall.

 

Here's what I'm thinking for 5th:

 

1. WWS assignments

2. MCT's level 5 poetry

3. Work through Figuratively Speaking

4. Add a few short stories that provide good examples of the elements we are studying

5. A couple full-length novels to try out her skills on at the end of the year

 

Does this sound doable?

 

Does anyone have suggestions for short stories or novels that work well for beginners looking to try out their analysis skills? I'm thinking no more than a sixth grade reading level so she can concentrate on the analysis rather than new vocab, etc.

 

Thanks!

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Use simple children's books or poems to helps introduce the different elements. Another source is Teaching the Classics. It teaches the main parts of the story, and has a list of questions to ask about each element.

Thanks! I have the Teaching the Classics DVDs and will be watching them this summer. I'm sure they will help me a lot.

 

What I would really love is a list of children's literature broken down by literary elements: what books have the most masterful examples of foreshadowing, allusion, different types of conflicts, easy-to-identify themes, etc. I don't suppose there is a resource like this out there?

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What I would really love is a list of children's literature broken down by literary elements...

 

Here are a few lists:

Books to Teach Literary Terms (Archer Street School Library)

Picture Books to Teach Basic Elements of Literature, Literary and Dramatic Devices (School District of the Chathams)

- Kim's Korner: Literary Elements and Devices (click on a literary element and scroll down for a list of books using the element)

Teaching Literary Elements (past WTM thread with specific book ideas for specific literary elements)

- "Mrs. Van Dyke's Children's Books Sorted by Craft or Strategy for Teacher Read Aloud" (do a google search for that as the subject, and when you click on it, a list downloads)

 

"Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Techniques" is an article by Shutta Crum that includes specific books for specific literary devices.

 

Teaching Literary Elements with Picture Books and Teaching Story Elements with Short Stories are curricula.

 

Figuratively Speaking  teaches the literary elements using examples from classic literature, while the Funschooling blog lists books to go with each of the elements in Figuratively Speaking.

 

Hope that helps get you started. :)

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Here are a few lists:

- Books to Teach Literary Terms (Archer Street School Library)

- Picture Books to Teach Basic Elements of Literature, Literary and Dramatic Devices (School District of the Chathams)

- Kim's Korner: Literary Elements and Devices (click on a literary element and scroll down for a list of books using the element)

- Teaching Literary Elements

- "Mrs. Van Dyke's Children's Books Sorted by Craft or Strategy for Teacher Read Aloud" (do a google search for that as the subject, and when you click on it, a list downloads)

 

"Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Techniques" is an article by Shutta Crum that includes specific books for specific literary devices.

 

Teaching Literary Elements with Picture Books and Teaching Story Elements with Short Stories are curricula.

 

Figuratively Speaking teaches the literary elements using examples from classic literature, while the Funschooling blog lists books to go with each of the elements in Figuratively Speaking.

 

Hope that helps get you started. :)

Thanks so much, Lori! These are really helpful. I hadn't really thought about picture books, but i think that would be a great way to introduce the elements, especially broad ones like theme, mood, etc. and reading through the other thread you linked have me some more ideas too. :D

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I have no advice, but I am extremely impressed she made it through that many levels of MCT poetry. We love MCT here, but the poetry is HARD!!!

It is hard, but gosh isn't it fantastic!? And when I say level 5, I mean the 5th grade book (I think it's the third book in the series). We did the 4th grade book last year and absolutely loved it. I typed up all of the poems that were used as examples and some extras as well, leaving room for her to illustrate them and write a short response. At the end of the year she had a beautiful, personal anthology. We also kept a notebook with examples of the poetic elements, and she added her own original examples. We had so much fun with it. I am really looking forward to starting the next level!

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I  loved Teaching the Classics and the free 6 week syllabus that is available to use as a supplement. I've not used these, but if you would like to go through a whole book while watching literary analysis happen, CenterforLit has these dvds

 

Here is a website with links to the works referenced in Figuratively Speaking. 

 

I used DP and TTC because I wanted to start leading a book club. I've lead one for the past 3 years. I want to move into ds writing more about literature during the next 3 years. I plan to use FS as well as CLE's reading and novels.

 

I am most excited about two things I ordered from Memoria Press, the Poetry for Grammar Stage and American Literature. Both look excellent! For the poetry book, I don't plan to use the student book, and will do all of the discussion in it orally. The American Literature book is set up very nicely. For each story or poem, there is a pre-grammar stage in which the student is asked to write about something that will lead into the story or poem and read through reading notes which includes vocabulary work before reading the actual work. After reading the work, there are comprehension questions which include giving details about the characters, and literary aspects. Then the student moves into questions in the Logic stage which are Socratic discussion questions in order to uncover the central one idea of the story. Lastly, the rhetoric stage is where the student writes about the central one idea in their own words with supporting details. There are essay options as well.  

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks! I have the Teaching the Classics DVDs and will be watching them this summer. I'm sure they will help me a lot.

 

What I would really love is a list of children's literature broken down by literary elements: what books have the most masterful examples of foreshadowing, allusion, different types of conflicts, easy-to-identify themes, etc. I don't suppose there is a resource like this out there?

This sounds like Reading Roadmaps to me...... Which we plan on using after we go through TTC using the 6 week syllabus!

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