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We can't afford all those wonderful High school summer enrichment programs


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My son never did a summer enrichment in high school. He took regular and honors classes, volunteered in the community and worked a summer job. He did dual enroll for a few classes his senior year. He had no problems with college acceptance - in fact he was offered very nice scholarships. In our experience it made no difference.

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My son never did a summer enrichment in high school. He took regular and honors classes, volunteered in the community and worked a summer job. He did dual enroll for a few classes his senior year. He had no problems with college acceptance - in fact he was offered very nice scholarships. In our experience it made no difference.

 

Yep. My dd didn't apply to any ivies, but one did contact her. I'm so cynical, I think it was to turn her down and keep their acceptance rate low, but she got into every school where she applied and was offered scholarships by more than one school, including one full ride. :)

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Look at what your son CAN do during the summer!

 

He can work -- yay! No matter what the job is, the fact that he has one shows responsibility and drive.

 

What else can he do -- can he work on his jazz piano or read every book by ???? or work on his computer programming or join in a "summer sings" choir or volunteer at a local VBS or study for the SAT or build you a new deck (!?!?!) or work on his driver's license or get in shape to run a 5K or join an ultimate frisbee league or learn to cook or .......

 

While some camps may be worth every penny, they are not the only road or even a necessary path to good college acceptance.

 

My kids have never been to an expensive camp, but during summers between the four of them they have done all kinds of wild, wonderful, and worthwhile things, and the colleges have not had a problem with the lack of expensive camps!

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I'd put more into actual course work taken for credit in high school. 

 

Also, I've come across some stuff over the years that looked really good and cheap. Most recently, I saw a program for rising sophomores and juniors that involves spending a week camping and monitoring the James River in Virginia (Virginia students only). It really looked good for someone interested in environmental sci and I believe it was free.  If you have a kid interested in biology, geology or environmental science I would search out programs in state parks and also programs associated with energy providers in your state. A lot of these things are not well advertised. 

 

I don't think $1000+ programs on college campuses are always real useful. I think they are money makers for the schools and recruitment tools for the schools (you are paying for your dc to be recruited and that's backwards). 

 

I also don't think it is necessary to spend a month attending a university's summer school, paying tuition room and board, just to get 3 credits. Many universities allow juniors and seniors to enroll in their regular summer school. Your dc can take dual enrollment courses during the school year. Or he can study and take AP exams. There is nothing magic about taking the course of XX college campus over the summer. 

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I can remember one book I read going so far as to say the summer enrichment programs have no bearing at all on acceptance into college.  They are money makers that prey off parents' ideas that their Dc will gain an advantage.  I'm paraphrasing, but that was the gist.  Might have been a Cal Newport book, though I can't be sure b/c I read a string of 'getting into college' type advice books a while back and I'm not sure which one expressed the idea.

 

​Anyway--my point is that whatever you and your Dc design and come up with on your own is going to be far more unique than attending a prescribed enrichment program.

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At the heart of it what I believe colleges really want are students who are actively engaged in the world - not apathetically killing years partying, zoned out full time on video games, etc.  Teens can do well with all sorts of different summers including internships, camps, working fast food, babysitting younger siblings, studying something they are interested in, etc.  It isn't a formula of one right experience - it is about being engaged in whatever you do. Work is not at all a bad thing. In fact last year the student I advised who had the biggest merit offers had spent his previous two summers working. In a generation of kids who are often considered entitled working can make a student stand out.

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We can't afford them either. Sometimes it pulls at my heart strings thinking that "if only" then my son would be sure to have xyz advantages. In reality I know that most people cannot spend over a thousand dollars a week for glorified summer camp. Secondly, I have never been all that impressed by what kids actually get out of it. For a thousand dollars a week I expect quite a good deal. Don't succumb to the allure of flashy status symbols. Love your child, Teach him how to be a good person, and let the chips fall where they may.

 

If he wants to go Ivy, put the money into high returns investing and spend it on tuition!

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Yeah, all these "get your college experience" pamphlets keep coming in, and I'm like, shoot, not this either. He belongs to John Hopkin's CTY program and he can't do anything they offer because it's so doggone expensive.

 

I'm focusing on what he can offer (classes, volunteering, job, etc.). But as a parent, want his opportunities to abound.

 

I'm sure all will work out.

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I read an article in the Boston Globe five years ago or so that interviewed some college admissions officers.  One guy said that students who have had jobs in high school (summer or school year) demonstrate qualities that he likes to see:  diligence and timeliness. 

 

That said, I think parents and students often seek out the exotic for the sake of resume building when there are often very cool things to do in your own backyard. 

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I seem to recall advice in one of the college admissions how-to books that, while participation in a pricey summer "program" is far from necessary to build a resume or transcript, students who are looking at selective colleges can do all kinds of things to show they made good use of their summers.

 

The author suggested doing things like making your own themed reading list and doing that, working a part-time job (bonus points if the job in some way ties in with your academic or extracurricular interests), forming a drama club with friends and putting on a play, volunteering for a local non-profit (again, especially good if it connects in some way with your interests), doing any kind of self-directed study that involves some kind of documenting or "output" (do a series of nature walks, and make a journal of your observations, for example), etc.

 

In other words, as Barbara H. said, colleges don't care whether your family can pay to send their students to educational summer camps in Tasmania. They just want to see students who are active and engaged and interested enough in the world and their own passions to spend summers doing something besides watching TV and working on their tans.

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In other words, as Barbara H. said, colleges don't care whether your family can pay to send their students to educational summer camps in Tasmania. They just want to see students who are active and engaged and interested enough in the world and their own passions to spend summers doing something besides watching TV and working on their tans.

:iagree: But, I do have to say bold print above does sound good right about now since snow seems to be the background for our lives currently.  Am I allowed to engaging in mindless TV and time outside (not the tanning part b/c I know that's not healthy)?  Okay, maybe not the TV part either.  I can swap that for a good book.

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OP, my dds have not done many expensive summer programs either, but they have done lots of inexpensive things over the summer. :)

 

There was a monthlong physics exploration at the local uni two summers ago funded by a grant that dd#2 participated in - awesome and free!

 

One year dd#1 was a counselor-in-training at a local engineering camp... she got leadership training ahead of time and lots of cool experiences at the other local uni for a month - free! Last year my dd#2 did the same at a local astronomy camp -- fun and free!

 

The summer before senior year, my dd got a paid internship at the local DOD/Uni research lab... and did it again before she left for college. She *made* decent money on that one... and it did look great on her applications, I won't lie.

 

I have seen many no-pay but free internships listed around here... at farms, at a bakery, at the unis.

 

Plus both dds have kept their part time jobs each summer, no matter what else they had going on. There can be a lot to do at very low cost, or even cash positive.

 

Happy hunting!

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It never occurred to us to send oldest to any of those pricey programs.  I suppose we could afford it, but why in the world would we?  I'm not convinced they mean anything to colleges, other than that the parents can afford to pay for them.  There are lots of opportunities to build a strong resume w/o paying a ton of money.  As others have said -- solid school work, community volunteering, job, etc.  I have absolutely no doubt that DS's volunteer activities through our city's youth council look just as impressive (and perhaps a lot more impressive) to most colleges than expensive programs.  Plus he was doing a lot to help people right here in our own community, which is important to us.

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ONE time (here's my anecdote that doesn't prove anything, generally), we paid for DD to attend the pricey 'pre-college summer program' at our local Uni... we have done a million things at that particular well regarded Uni over the years, so we felt pretty sure we knew that it would be a good quality program. Kids actually pay the high tuition + huge room and board to sleep over, too. Although it was the slickest, most well packaged and aggressively promoted program any one of my kids has ever participated in (excepting college, lol), it was by far the WORST. Most of the kids weren't interested in the topics at hand, didn't really want to be there, and there was no joy at all about it. It was expensive just to have her participate... I can't imagine how I would have felt if I had paid R&B as well. Luckily we had only signed up for the short two week program.

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Almost every camp my kids have been involved in offers scholarships. Some of the academic camps are very inexpensive or even free. PAN is free http://www.nscl.msu.edu/teachersstudents/programs/pan ISSYP is $500 (that is for 2weeks and includes room and board. $250 per week for an awesome international theoretical physics experience). http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/outreach/students/programs/international-summer-school-young-physicists

 

It takes researching opportunities and applying early, but summer camps do not have to cost a lot of money. And many specify to not let cost deter you from applying.

 

That said, kids absolutely do not need to attend summer camp. Spending summers working and busy with friends and activities is definitely the norm (and what most of my kids have done.)

 

eTA: I wouldn't consider the university sponsored type summer programs bc they are outrageously expensive and are geared to be money makers for the universities. But there are fantastic academic camp experiences out there.

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  • 1 month later...

Bumping this up

 

This summer, my daughter will do 3 weeks of dance intensive, do a weekly conditioning classes, and possibly some other classes they have in her stronger dance areas if she gets in This is through her studio and and it's required to be in company. We can't afford to do the additional weeks nor do one of the recognized intensives. Dance is a passion but not what she wants to major in (because she's not a strong ballerina and hates, hates, hates modern dance with a passion and that seems to be what she would have to do).

 

She is also taking driver's ed and she's taking an online Spanish II course for summer school -but it can be rolled into the school year. She needs to study for the PSAT and PLAN in the fall but not all day.

 

She will probably help with VBS at church again as she does every year.

 

Jobs are hard to find for teens-she is an assistant teacher in a pre-ballet class in the school year and babysits for a Hungarian immigrant family once a week. Internships in her areas of interest are not common in this area.

 

Looking for ideas for her.

 

My rising Freshman (13 yo)  is thinking of getting street performer permit and doing yo-yo tricks at all the festivals lol -he's only got a 6 week summer though and one those weeks in boy scout camp.

 

 

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High school summer enrichment programs? Honestly, I've never heard of them. I'll just keep my head buried in the sand. I have 3 in college; I'm guessing this last one will be fine without them. 

 

The importance of these things depends on your student's area(s) of interest and on the selectivity of the colleges or programs that are appealing after high school. It is my understanding that for kids who are hoping for admission into a competitive performing arts school or program, summer enrichment is valuable. (All of the applications my son filled out for such programs asked him to list what he had done each of his high school summers. Such programs can also provide experiences, training and roles to list on a performance resume.)

 

As I think I mentioned in an earlier post on this thread, it's definitely not necessary for every student to participate in pricey summer programs every year. Students who aren't trying for admission to selective schools or programs probably don't need to worry about it at all. And there are lots of alternatives for free or low-cost ways to make summers enriching.

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I have to admit that I looked at a few of these (before I hyperventilated at the price).  I fell for the hype that this would be THE THING that would get ds accepted into a good college.  Then I came to my senses.

 

Ds struggled a bit at the beginning of this year (junior) with burnout.  The thing I think he needs most before starting a very demanding senior year (mostly his choice), is NOT to be burnt out during the summer by some "academic camp".

 

He will work all summer volunteering at our library like he always does.  He tutors 1st-6th graders at the library each week, as well.  He is a board member for the non-profit fundraising arm of the library and wants to spend more time helping them out.  We will be taking two large trips as a family and finishing some chemistry that just did not get finished this year.  He will also be helping to re-landscape our yard (over an acre), plan and put in a vegetable garden, and scrape and paint two barns.

 

Personally, I think he will be very busy, AND this is the last summer I am going to have my son all to myself.  I am going to enjoy every moment of it.

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The importance of these things depends on your student's area(s) of interest and on the selectivity of the colleges or programs that are appealing after high school. It is my understanding that for kids who are hoping for admission into a competitive performing arts school or program, summer enrichment is valuable. (All of the applications my son filled out for such programs asked him to list what he had done each of his high school summers. Such programs can also provide experiences, training and roles to list on a performance resume.)

 

As I think I mentioned in an earlier post on this thread, it's definitely not necessary for every student to participate in pricey summer programs every year. Students who aren't trying for admission to selective schools or programs probably don't need to worry about it at all. And there are lots of alternatives for free or low-cost ways to make summers enriching.

 

Ah, mine would have listed: eat, swim, eat, nap, eat, swim, eat, sleep. That is how summer went.

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My kids don't do summer enrichment unless you count the family bible camps we always attended.  This year both teens are going to cadet camp which they are getting paid to attend (yes they go to camp for free and the gov't pays them $60 a week for being there)                                                                            

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I don't know for sure, but I suspect the research ds did at summer academic camps are what made him competitive for the research based honors program he was accepted into, bc he was not competitive based just on test scores which this school uses as a major screening tool. The camps demonstrated his serious love for research. He just found out today that he was awarded one of their few fellowships in the program (which is basically a scholarship.) The fellowship $$ surpasses not only our expenses for every camp he ever attended but additionally about 1/2 of his dual enrollent costs for the past 2 yrs. They do have academic benefits. :)

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I don't know for sure, but I suspect the research ds did at summer academic camps are what made him competitive for the research based honors program he was accepted into, bc he was not competitive based just on test scores which this school uses as a major screening tool. The camps demonstrated his serious love for research. He just found out today that he was awarded one of their few fellowships in the program (which is basically a scholarship.) The fellowship $$ surpasses not only our expenses for every camp he ever attended but additionally about 1/2 of his dual enrollent costs for the past 2 yrs. They do have academic benefits. :)

Can you explain what type of research he did?  I can see why that would be beneficial, but some of the stuff I've seen marketed is just silly.  

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This is a description of one camp's project http://www.ssp.org/program/orbit.php (a simplified description. They were in class 6 hrs every day plus homework in order to have the skills to complete the project)

 

Astronomy Camp's website must be down bc I can't get the link to open, but they also come with research projects that they write up. Ds's had something to do with elliptical vs spiral galaxies, but I don't remember the details (mostly bc I didn't understand it! ;) ). Here is a wiki link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomy_Camp

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But what about kids who really do want to go to selective schools -but are not interested in science or STEM careers.

 

My daughter loves dance but dance major came off because of her dislike of modern and our inability to afford ballet intensives/studios. She loves jazz but I can't afford these $2000-$6000 intensives especially when she most likely isn't going to major in dance (maybe dance education??) and there really doesn't seem to be a niche in colleges for jazz and tap dancers who are not classically ballet trained and hate modern dance.....

 

She will likely major in business or communications. She really has no clue to what she wants to be now that dance is off the table. She does, however, want to get into a selective school or at least do what it takes to keep that as option.

 

We are just in that income level -not rich enough to give the extras but not poor enough to get the scholarships for those extras......

 

 

So any ideas in NC RTP area?

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Ah, mine would have listed: eat, swim, eat, nap, eat, swim, eat, sleep. That is how summer went.

 

Which is awesome, if it happens to work for the kids you've got. It was how I envisioned summers for my kids, too, except that it turned out they would get bored silly without enough brain stimulation. I started signing them up for summer camps out of sheer self-preservation.

 

For the last few years, my son has looked forward to summer as a time when he can indulge in the doing the things he loves full-time, without that pesky schoolwork to get in the way. (He started talking about what he wants to do this summer back in November.) It's convenient, too, because having performance camps and programs on his applications was a way to show colleges that he is really committed to serious study in that area.

 

So, for my son, a good summer program is a big deal. But that doesn't mean that's true for every kid in every situation.

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Which is awesome, if it happens to work for the kids you've got. It was how I envisioned summers for my kids, too, except that it turned out they would get bored silly without enough brain stimulation. I started signing them up for summer camps out of sheer self-preservation.

 

For the last few years, my son has looked forward to summer as a time when he can indulge in the doing the things he loves full-time, without that pesky schoolwork to get in the way. (He started talking about what he wants to do this summer back in November.) It's convenient, too, because having performance camps and programs on his applications was a way to show colleges that he is really committed to serious study in that area.

 

So, for my son, a good summer program is a big deal. But that doesn't mean that's true for every kid in every situation.

 

 

:lol:  :lol: This probably isn't the eat, swim you envisioned! They were swimming miles (and I literally mean miles) of yardage in two a day practices on swim team. The college coaches were pretty pleased with how they spent the summer. Their brains were too exhausted to need to be stimulated! :laugh:  :laugh:  

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But what about kids who really do want to go to selective schools -but are not interested in science or STEM careers.

 

My daughter loves dance but dance major came off because of her dislike of modern and our inability to afford ballet intensives/studios. She loves jazz but I can't afford these $2000-$6000 intensives especially when she most likely isn't going to major in dance (maybe dance education??) and there really doesn't seem to be a niche in colleges for jazz and tap dancers who are not classically ballet trained and hate modern dance.....

 

She will likely major in business or communications. She really has no clue to what she wants to be now that dance is off the table. She does, however, want to get into a selective school or at least do what it takes to keep that as option.

 

We are just in that income level -not rich enough to give the extras but not poor enough to get the scholarships for those extras......

 

 

So any ideas in NC RTP area?

 

Do you have any community musical theater-type programs she could join this summer?  She could use her love of dance by just enjoying it rather than pushing it, but it could also be good for the 'communications' side of her interests.

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:lol:  :lol: This probably isn't the eat, swim you envisioned! They were swimming miles (and I literally mean miles) of yardage in two a day practices on swim team. The college coaches were pretty pleased with how they spent the summer. Their brains were too exhausted to need to be stimulated! :laugh:  :laugh:  

 

Well, participating on a serious swim team sounds like a summer enrichment program to me!

 

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Does anyone know of a camp like SSP for social sciences, particularly economics? The apple really doesn't fall far from the tree and all of a sudden I'm fielding questions about the gold standard and what influences the unemployment rate? While dh and I are enjoying Trinqueta's interest in things that fascinate us, I think she'd like to do more than talk to mom and dad eventually.

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Do you have any community musical theater-type programs she could join this summer?  She could use her love of dance by just enjoying it rather than pushing it, but it could also be good for the 'communications' side of her interests.

 

Most of the "community" stuff here is camps and other costly endeavors. I found one thing that she might still be able to get into in a neighboring town but she's a dancer -she's timid about singing (even though she got into chorus at school next year) and not much into acting. I think she can do it because I saw the play last year and I am sure she could do some sort of supporting role (not star -her dear talented friend is the "star" anyway) but I think she will think she "can't"......

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Last month I attended a workshop at The Great Homeschool Convention with a man who had been an admissions person at three universities.  He said they are looking for grades, SAT/ACT scores, and involvement (community service, leadership, clubs, jobs, ...).  Not once did he mention anything about enrichments camps/programs.

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But what about kids who really do want to go to selective schools -but are not interested in science or STEM careers.

 

My daughter loves dance but dance major came off because of her dislike of modern and our inability to afford ballet intensives/studios. She loves jazz but I can't afford these $2000-$6000 intensives especially when she most likely isn't going to major in dance (maybe dance education??) and there really doesn't seem to be a niche in colleges for jazz and tap dancers who are not classically ballet trained and hate modern dance.....

 

She will likely major in business or communications. She really has no clue to what she wants to be now that dance is off the table. She does, however, want to get into a selective school or at least do what it takes to keep that as option.

 

We are just in that income level -not rich enough to give the extras but not poor enough to get the scholarships for those extras......

 

 

So any ideas in NC RTP area?

 

Did she audition for intensives?  Some students get scholarships to cover part or all of the tuition/housing cost of the ballet intensives.  Of course, there's still the expense of the shoes -- I've heard they go through a boatload of shoes per week, especially pointe. 

 

One of my friends teaches tap at a college.  Next time I see her we will probably discuss what you've mentioned here.  I sympathize with your daughter, though, basis conversations I've already had with my friend.  She really doesn't like musical theater tap -- she's a rhythm tapper -- and she's not too keen on dance competitions.  BUT, that's where the money is.  So she teaches part time at the college and elsewhere, and also cleans houses. 

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But what about kids who really do want to go to selective schools -but are not interested in science or STEM careers.

 

My daughter loves dance but dance major came off because of her dislike of modern and our inability to afford ballet intensives/studios. She loves jazz but I can't afford these $2000-$6000 intensives especially when she most likely isn't going to major in dance (maybe dance education??) and there really doesn't seem to be a niche in colleges for jazz and tap dancers who are not classically ballet trained and hate modern dance.....

 

 

My daughter has a degree in theatre, and my son is headed to college this fall as a musical theatre major/dance minor. As the mom of two performing arts students, I feel your pain, except that neither of mine opted to try for especially selective colleges.

 

Over the years, we just kept scrounging for opportunities for them, looking for things they could do to stay involved in performance without breaking the bank. They've done community theatre, for example, which is free. Last year, my son did a four-week dance intensive sponsored by the dance department of our local community college. That program was free, too, because it is used as a recruitment tool for the college. (I noted that they are charging for the program this year, although it is still significantly less than any similar program in the area.)

 

My son has also done a LOT of volunteering for various organizations, which often gets him opportunities to participate in interesting ways. For example, he's volunteered as a junior counselor for summer day camps at a local children's theatre, and he has frequently been drafted to serve as dance captain for a group of young students, to do tech for another group's final presentation, even to fill in for absent students.

 

My daughter earned herself dance lessons for a year by working the front desk at a dance studio. Maybe a local dance school would be open to letting your daughter exchange assisting in classes for lessons?

 

If all else fails, would your daughter be interested in getting together a group of her dance friends and putting on a show for families and friends? It's not quite the same thing, but my son is coordinating a "tap jam" this weekend at a local park. He put out the word on Facebook to all of his friends who tap that he would be at the park this weekend with his portable tap floor and a CD/MP3 player and his tap shoes. The plan is for anyone who is interested and available to meet up and spend a couple of hours showing off and teaching each other moves. If this goes well, he hopes to turn it into a recurring event over the summer and possibly expand to holding a more formal, two-day event when he's home next summer.

 

Two final thoughts:

 

There are college programs that focus on jazz and theatre-style dance. However, there aren't a lot of them, and pretty much every program will still expect students to have training in ballet for technique. (My son is a tap dancer, too. So we put in a lot of hours looking for a college that would allow him to study tap seriously.)

 

You might be surprised what scholarships are available to your daughter. I used to be convinced that we earn too much to be eligible for much of anything, scholarship-wise. However, my son has been awarded full or partial scholarships for several performance programs just because we made it clear we couldn't pay the full price. (He was offered a scholarship to cover half the tuition for a summer theatre program a couple of years ago after I explained that we didn't have the money to pay for his choir's summer tour and the theatre program. I didn't even have to fill out a form.) Honestly, it never hurts to ask,

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Last month I attended a workshop at The Great Homeschool Convention with a man who had been an admissions person at three universities. He said they are looking for grades, SAT/ACT scores, and involvement (community service, leadership, clubs, jobs, ...). Not once did he mention anything about enrichments camps/programs.

Many schools are looking for students that have spent time devoted to something they are passionate about. It doesn't have to be through summer programs, but they are definitely a great opportunity for kids that have the chance to attend if they are accepted. For homeschooled kids, it is also a chance to interact with students and faculty that are as passionate about their interests as they are. There is something wonderful for kids connecting with other kids that can relate to their ideas on the same level. My ds keeps in touch with all of the camp friends he has made over the yrs. He even gets phone calls from one friend that lives in India.

 

Necessary? No. But wonderful nonetheless and definitely educational.

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Many schools are looking for students that have spent time devoted to something they are passionate about.

 

Not only are schools looking for this, but sometimes it gets a bit circular...in order to be accepted into a competitive program, you need to show you've participated in other programs, thus showing high interest. We have run into this already, and I have been so glad we could fill in the blanks with previous activities/programs!

 

They might not be 100% necessary, but it would be inaccurate to make a blanket statement saying summer enrichment programs aren't worthwhile or valuable.

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Thanks Jenny

 

Amazingly she just said she would try the free community musical theatre program and we found a Counselor in Training Spot at a camp put on by one of the big arts places here and she is going to apply for it.

 

She is on the worship team for the children's ministry at church and does sing there and runs the tech booth (singing in front of little kids is apparently not so intimidating lol), She does that year around and then usually leads a group of kids in VBS in the summer. She was on the youth liturgical dance team at church but she was only one that showed up every week so it was disbanded.

 

She already is an assistant teacher at her studio to help pay for dance classes (and barely covers gas to get there lol). That is the best she can do at that studio -it's more for the experience than the amount off tuition. She is not a "favorite" at the studio and never will be (they don't hate her either -I think it's because she's not loud and pushy).  The other studios just are not the same quality or else too far away. It's a great tap school but it's ballet is very weak and the good ballet schools are weak at the other stuff.

 

She is actually at an arts high school but the dance program ended up not being very good (more artsy than technique driven) and so she is switching to the much higher quality choral program.

 

I think w/the theatre and CIT -she is well rounded for summer. She still got to start Spanish II and work on Math II w/her tutor so she can place into Math III.

 

 

*** That dance intensive at a community college sounds great. I checked and none have any local. But thanks for recommending the community theatre. It jogged my mind that while our city is expensive, the smaller neighboring towns still have low cost/free things like community theatre.

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If all else fails, would your daughter be interested in getting together a group of her dance friends and putting on a show for families and friends? It's not quite the same thing, but my son is coordinating a "tap jam" this weekend at a local park. He put out the word on Facebook to all of his friends who tap that he would be at the park this weekend with his portable tap floor and a CD/MP3 player and his tap shoes. The plan is for anyone who is interested and available to meet up and spend a couple of hours showing off and teaching each other moves. If this goes well, he hopes to turn it into a recurring event over the summer and possibly expand to holding a more formal, two-day event when he's home next summer.

 

 

 

This sounds like something out of Cal Newport's How to be a High School Superstar!  So very cool!

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Does anyone know of a camp like SSP for social sciences, particularly economics? The apple really doesn't fall far from the tree and all of a sudden I'm fielding questions about the gold standard and what influences the unemployment rate? While dh and I are enjoying Trinqueta's interest in things that fascinate us, I think she'd like to do more than talk to mom and dad eventually.

I know nothing about econ, but looking through cogito.org, I followed some links and found

http://www.fte.org/student-programs/economics-for-leaders-program/

http://www.futureinvestorsclub.com/index-wallstcamp.cfm

http://www.kidscamps.com/academics/business_camps.html

http://mises.org/media/categories/203/Economics-for-High-School-Students (not a camp, but might be of interest)

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Thanks Jenny

 

Amazingly she just said she would try the free community musical theatre program and we found a Counselor in Training Spot at a camp put on by one of the big arts places here and she is going to apply for it. . . .

 

I think w/the theatre and CIT -she is well rounded for summer. She still got to start Spanish II and work on Math II w/her tutor so she can place into Math III.

 

Yes, it sounds like she's all set and doing plenty to fill out her resume nicely!

 

I'm glad it's working out for her.

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