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AAS says to make sure your child is hearing the /tr/  blend correct. It says some kids hear that as /ch/. My son hears the /tr/ as /ch/ but it does not give any tips on how to fix that. I have to waaaaaaay over pronunciate each sound individually until it doesn't even sound like the word anymore for him to hear the correct sounds. Does anybody have any tips on how to help with this?

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Would it help to describe the different way his mouth is positioned for each sound.  The teeth are touching for the 'ch' sound, but slightly parted as you tap your tongue for the 't' and then raise the back of the tongue for the 'r' sound.

Describing how the mouth and tongue should move for each sound helped our family.

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My son had the same problem (writing "chrain" for "train"). As near as I can think of, there aren't any English words with /ch/ followed by /r/. So I told my son that when he thinks he hears /ch/r/ that he's really hearing /t/r/ and that it just blends together funny. He accepted that and didn't have any problems after that. The "dr" blend (as in drum) had a similar issue for him (he'd hear /j/r/), and I used the same method ("if you think you hear /j/r/, it's really /d/r/").

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Unrelated sort of but we also use AAS and it took quite awhile for my boys to grasp that the "nk" sound was not "ngk". I really found it almost impossible to pronounce it without it sounding like there was a g in there. I just had to tell them there was no g, and when they heard "nk" to just use "nk."

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Unrelated sort of but we also use AAS and it took quite awhile for my boys to grasp that the "nk" sound was not "ngk". I really found it almost impossible to pronounce it without it sounding like there was a g in there. I just had to tell them there was no g, and when they heard "nk" to just use "nk."

 

 

So funny, but for the longest time my son insisted that "pink" was spelled "pingk." It was something he picked up from his public-K for some reason. They did blended phonics and sight words, spelling words were just Dolch words, so something got confused there for him. We tried telling him that it wasn't "pingk" but he insisted. He even insisted that the dictionary was wrong. We discussed it for months. We even had him ask other people how to spell pink, and when they said "pink" he insisted on teaching them that it was spelled "pingk."

 

So then, months later, we finally get to "nk" in AAS and I make sure to point out to him "See, this sound is spelled "nk" so we spell pink like "pink""

 

He gives me a look of utter innocence and says, "I know that."

 

:willy_nilly:  :willy_nilly:  :willy_nilly:

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SarahW--I am glad my kids aren't the only ones. I remember asking some other friends how they would pronounce it so it didn't sound like there was a "g" and they had no idea. My oldest did go to PS for K so maybe that was part of it, but the youngest didn't so I'm not sure what happened with him!

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