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Halcyon

Can someone link me to a nice 4 year overview for high school?

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Okay, so please throw out some ideas for English-what have/do you all cover? In my high school, we studied a lot of the Great Books. 

 

We mostly do the WTM method, chronological history with corresponding lit. 

 

 

Also posting the Talented and Gifted curriculum from Dallas (top high school in country)

Ninth Grade

 

 

  • Pre-AP English I

 

"Pre-AP" brings out my snarky side. 

 

They've got to be kidding me. Kids can't take all those APs without imploding!

 

They do, but that doesn't make it a superior learning experience. 

 

 

Top schools are definitely not out for your son!   <snip>

 

I read a great quote on another homeschooling list — the woman said that an interviewer from Yale told her that people mistakenly think they're looking for a class of well-rounded kids, when actually they're looking for a well-rounded class of jagged kids. Instead of trying to replicate an over-the-top AP PS schedule, maximize the opportunities you have as a homeschooler to help your son stand out by highlighting his unique interests and abilities.

 

 

I agree. And cool quote. 

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Okay, so this basically means that top top top schools are out for my kid. I really don't think that AP type schedule will be suitable for him. I mean, who knows? He may surprise me a be a study freak come high school...but I doubt it. He enjoys challenge, but both he and I want him to have time to explore interests, exercise, eat well and enjoy life. I LOVED high school, and I want him to, too.

 

You know what? They may not be out, or they may - but you won't know until 12th grade, even if he were the kind of kid who would thrive with tons of APs.

What I have learned from the entire process of getting a student ready for college is that it is not worth it spending four years of the kid's life solely grooming to look good for admission to a highly selective school. The high school years are precious life time and far too valuable to give them such a narrow focus.

I am saying this as the parent of a student who does have the ambition and academic abilities and who is competetive for these top schools. She had a good high school time, pursued rigorous course work without jumping through too ridiculous hoops, has been able to follow her interests, pursued extracurriculars she loved (with no thought given to how they might look on a college application). Even if she does not get admitted to a top school, her education ensures that she gets into a good school and is prepared to pursue the college studies she is interested in.

Your student can have a rigorous college prep education and time to pursue interests. He may or may not end up competetive for Harvard, but it does not matter all that much. I feel sorry for those students who spent their entire high school time with the eyes firmly glued on the elusive prize of admission to a selective school, who denied themselves the things they find fun and interesting to tailor every thing they do to the college application -  and who end up not getting in.

You will end up educating your son according to his abilities and interests. You can't forsee now how he will develop. He may surprise you. Just take it one year at a time.

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Okay, so please throw out some ideas for English-what have/do you all cover? In my high school, we studied a lot of the Great Books. 

 

I tied English courses in with history, which covered 2 high school years. The other 2 years was simply coming up with a general thematic idea for a reading list whether it be sci fi or world lit or modern lit.  We did Great Books, some good books such as popular non-fiction (Bill Bryson's books, for instance) along with a play or two each year and some poetry. The WTM and the Well-Educated Mind were my starting point and inspiration and lectures from the Teaching Company helped flesh things out.  I had the Lively Art of Writing to refer to and some of the high school MCT curricula for the nuts and bolts of things, but essay topics usually arose naturally from our discussions.

 

The history end was generally researching the context of a work.  I did not use a spine, but lots of folks use SWB's epic history tomes.  Instead I sent my ds to research a period or author on the internet, and we used a lovely series from the Teaching Company called "Western Literary Canon in Context".  

 

It was my favorite part of the high school years because it was mostly reading together, watching a teaching company lecture and discussing books. What a treat to get to enjoy your teen's company for a chunk of each day!  We still trade books and talk about them long distance.

 

One final thought about all this high school planning.  High school doesn't need to be a momentous change in how you homeschool.  What you do simply changes with your child as he or she grows and matures.  Do what fits them best and feels best for your family, look for opportunities for them to volunteer and work, and cherish the time.  

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Okay, so this basically means that top top top schools are out for my kid. I really don't think that AP type schedule will be suitable for him. I mean, who knows? He may surprise me a be a study freak come high school...but I doubt it. He enjoys challenge, but both he and I want him to have time to explore interests, exercise, eat well and enjoy life. I LOVED high school, and I want him to, too.

 

ime, these students aren't study freaks..they are simply the students who paid attention and soaked in 100% of the course offering that was available in middle school and they have the reading level appropriate for the course. They do not need the review that an honors or reg ed level course offers.  My kid for ex, is taking APUSH this year. The bones of the course are the honors middle school USHistory offerings plus knowing the DBQ format from previous coures.  The course for him consists of adding details to what he already knows, as well as viewing a few things from a more adult perspective.  So, skim the text, take note of new, up the detail level in the essay, move on. Takes about 30 min on the days he does essay prompt response outlines. His friends that didn't soak in the info or weren't in honors in middle school or who haven't mastered essays are sweating...and his friends who don't have the appropriate reading comprehension level or speed to be in the course are sinking. I"m not seeing a real big difference between this course and the courses I took as a freshman in college in terms of workload. As always ymmv depending on course provider. 

 

These kids don't want high school to be four years of review plus a driblet of new.

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It's a really neat feeling to have raised and educated your child as you saw fit (and as suited him) and then to stand back and look at him and say, "He is a really great young man. What kind of college experience will fit where he is? Who has the 'next step?'" instead of looking at a gangly 8th grader and saying, "Who could you be, if we worked hard enough? Let me measure you for your box. I want you to fit into this box by the end of the next four years."

The first is a joy and a delight. The second? Very few homeschoolers want that, I'd imagine. But sometimes we have to spell out the difference.

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It's a really neat feeling to have raised and educated your child as you saw fit (and as suited him) and then to stand back and look at him and say, "He is a really great young man. What kind of college experience will fit where he is? Who has the 'next step?'" instead of looking at a gangly 8th grader and saying, "Who could you be, if we worked hard enough? Let me measure you for your box. I want you to fit into this box by the end of the next four years."

 

The first is a joy and a delight. The second? Very few homeschoolers want that, I'd imagine. But sometimes we have to spell out the difference.

 

I'd "like" this 100 times if I could.

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One thing to keep in mind is that homeschooling to prepare for AP tests isn't necessarily the same burden as AP courses in school. Some of what is making APs tough at some brick and mortars is cranking a ton of extra busy type homework that may not be necessary for your student. I've worked with homeschoolers who have done well on APs with many fewer hours on task than what they would have been expected to get an A in some strong public school courses.

 

I will also say I believe there is a point of diminishing returns with APs. Students need enough validation (in whatever combination - SAT subject tests, APs, dual enrollment, competitions, etc.) but it doesn't have to be all APs and every AP under the sun. There is a role for thoughtful planning here and this is where we are lucky as homeschoolers. We can start APs earlier, we can pick and choose, we can find balance. We have choices that students in public and private schools don't really have.

 

And, I agree a lot of kids at AP heavy or IB schools are totally overwhelmed, stressed out and not getting enough sleep. It can easily be too much. Sometimes students stay on that track because they are highly motivated and believe that is their path to selective admissions. The other factor operating though is that for some bright students they don't want to be stuck in classes with slacker kids who don't are about learning. At some schools all the kids who care are in APs.

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What I have learned from the entire process of getting a student ready for college is that it is not worth it spending four years of the kid's life solely grooming to look good for admission to a highly selective school. The high school years are precious life time and far too valuable to give them such a narrow focus.

...

Your student can have a rigorous college prep education and time to pursue interests. He may or may not end up competetive for Harvard, but it does not matter all that much. I feel sorry for those students who spent their entire high school time with the eyes firmly glued on the elusive prize of admission to a selective school, who denied themselves the things they find fun and interesting to tailor every thing they do to the college application -  and who end up not getting in.

You will end up educating your son according to his abilities and interests. You can't forsee now how he will develop. He may surprise you. Just take it one year at a time.

 

 

This is wonderful, regentrude. Thank you. 

 

Let's hope DS has some particular interests come high school ;) Right now, while he enjoys Math and History, he would much rather be perfecting his card tricks. I swear, that child spends 2 hours a day perfecting his sleight-of-hand.  :coolgleamA:

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It's a really neat feeling to have raised and educated your child as you saw fit (and as suited him) and then to stand back and look at him and say, "He is a really great young man. What kind of college experience will fit where he is? Who has the 'next step?'" instead of looking at a gangly 8th grader and saying, "Who could you be, if we worked hard enough? Let me measure you for your box. I want you to fit into this box by the end of the next four years."

 

The first is a joy and a delight. The second? Very few homeschoolers want that, I'd imagine. But sometimes we have to spell out the difference.

 

 

Like a billion times. 

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This is wonderful, regentrude. Thank you. 

 

Let's hope DS has some particular interests come high school ;) Right now, while he enjoys Math and History, he would much rather be perfecting his card tricks. I swear, that child spends 2 hours a day perfecting his sleight-of-hand.  :coolgleamA:

 

Performance could be a lucrative job for working his way through college! The hours are SO flexible. Card tricks can be set up any time, any where, with little overhead, and just pass the hat after a street performance, or campus performance, or... He could even work with a local booking agency to be part  of the evening's entertainment for a corporate entertainment, small parties, at coffee shops...

 

I remember seeing a documentary MANY years ago (probably late 80s) where the guy earned his college money by doing a delivery job -- and on the side, he offered to do a back flip for 25 cents. He was earning $3/minute, as it only took about 5 seconds to do a flip and get handed a quarter.

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Top schools are definitely not out for your son! Keep in mind that for most PS (and even private school) students, APs are really the only means they have of demonstrating "rigor." So it becomes a bit of an arms race — if most of the kids in your school are taking 4 APs, then you need to take 6 to stand out. If most are taking 6, maybe you need to take 8... etc.  Those kids have to choose their courses from a pretty limited selection, so the only means they have of standing out are topping the # of APs and the test scores of other applicants and/or having some pretty amazing ECs and community service projects. 

 

Colleges really do want a certain amount of diversity, though — no one wants an incoming class composed ONLY of kids with the same 12 APs and 2400 SAT scores. Homeschoolers have so many more ways to show off their interests and passions and commitment to excellence, besides just maxing out on APs. This is where having the time and resources to "explore his interests" can really work in your favor.

 

If you were an adcom at a highly selective school, who'd just waded through a stack of nearly-identical applications with the same APs and ECs (president of the French Club; editor of the school paper, etc.), and you picked up an application from a kid whose transcript included Mongolian and Old Norse instead of AP Spanish, or European Philosophy from Descartes to Derrida instead of AP Euro, or Metafiction and the Postmodern Narrative instead of AP Language, wouldn't you perk up a bit? 

 

I read a great quote on another homeschooling list — the woman said that an interviewer from Yale told her that people mistakenly think they're looking for a class of well-rounded kids, when actually they're looking for a well-rounded class of jagged kids. Instead of trying to replicate an over-the-top AP PS schedule, maximize the opportunities you have as a homeschooler to help your son stand out by highlighting his unique interests and abilities.

 

And that's the battle going on in my head over the past few months. I finally decided American School would give him time to dig deep into his interests. I see all of these AP/Honors courses and know that's not my son. He's a hard worker, but isn't interested in jumping through a bunch of hoops and frankly neither am I. I want him to shine in his own way and let the college acceptances fall where they may. 

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Let's hope DS has some particular interests come high school ;) Right now, while he enjoys Math and History, he would much rather be perfecting his card tricks. I swear, that child spends 2 hours a day perfecting his sleight-of-hand.  :coolgleamA:

 

On a positive, hopeful note... look at James Randi!  ;) 

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One thing to keep in mind is that homeschooling to prepare for AP tests isn't necessarily the same burden as AP courses in school. Some of what is making APs tough at some brick and mortars is cranking a ton of extra busy type homework that may not be necessary for your student. I've worked with homeschoolers who have done well on APs with many fewer hours on task than what they would have been expected to get an A in some strong public school courses.

 

 

This is what I have heard from some IRL homeschooling families who have chosen to self-study for AP's. It seems to me that homeschooled students have the same benefit of learning the material for an AP exam in a meaningful manner as they do in learning material for a non-AP class. Is it farfetched to think that students may be able to learn AP topics in a meaningful way with a textbook, discussion, solving problems, essay writing (or whatever learning activities the student would be completing to learn the material anyway) and then translate that learning into a successful AP score by focusing on test prep a few weeks before the exam? I hope I am not naive in thinking that a student can learn the material for an AP exam without focusing the entire school year teaching to the test or assigning projects that they would not otherwise find valuable.

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It's a really neat feeling to have raised and educated your child as you saw fit (and as suited him) and then to stand back and look at him and say, "He is a really great young man. What kind of college experience will fit where he is? Who has the 'next step?'" instead of looking at a gangly 8th grader and saying, "Who could you be, if we worked hard enough? Let me measure you for your box. I want you to fit into this box by the end of the next four years."

 

The first is a joy and a delight. The second? Very few homeschoolers want that, I'd imagine. But sometimes we have to spell out the difference.

 

Thank you for the lovely reminder of why we are homeschooling in the first place.

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I love a lot of these posts. We started homeschooling because my son has ADD and was spending all day at public school (including lunch and after school) doing work and then coming home and doing 3 more hours of work. He was in advanced classes and testing at the top of his class. We pulled him out because working for about 12-14 hours a day was WAY too much for a kid! He would be in tears every night. Now he is in high school and the pressure of college and scholarships is building.  As a homeschool mom I am trying to plan things out for him but the competition seems overwhelming. He is really smart but when picking a homeschool curriculum I am not seeing very many that say Honors and we can’t afford the AP classes that some places offer. That leaves us with the regular curriculums and hoping it will be enough. It is a shame because if he was still in public school it would show he is in advanced classes and then he could take the available AP courses too. I just hope we don’t end up regretting homeschooling. I just don’t seem right that the public school system would be a better option though.

 

My heart skips a beat every time I sit down and try to research all of this. It is very unnerving and overwhelming and trying to figure all of it out on my own is so stressful.

I have learned that most colleges want homeschoolers to have the SATII Subject test but then I am unsure as to what test he should take and when. Yet another unknown to stress about.

My son is also an introvert so getting those extracurricular activities is another challenge.

 

The only thing I know to do is to pick a curriculum and take it one year at a time. When he is in 11th grade we might be able to sign him up with the local CC.

 

Thanks for all of you that posted on how important it is to enjoy these years. It is so hard to keep that in perspective with the pressure of what you “should be doing†to prepare for college.

Having all AP or Honors classes with tons of extra community activities is way too much and for some of us homeschoolers it isn’t even an option (because of cost).  

 

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… We started homeschooling because my son has ADD and… because working for about 12-14 hours a day was WAY too much for a kid! He would be in tears every night.

 

SO sorry to hear how rough it was! :( BUT...  :hurray:  So glad homeschooling has reduced stress for your DS! :)

 

 

I have learned that most colleges want homeschoolers to have the SATII Subject test but then I am unsure as to what test he should take and when. Yet another unknown to stress about.

 

Actually, that's NOT something you need to stress about. :)

 

Just to clarify: it's NOT the SATII (SAT Subject tests) that most colleges want. Instead, most colleges want to see either the ACT or the SAT (also known as the SAT Reasoning Test) scores from ALL high schoolers, as most colleges have a minimum score for admission to the school, AND use the scores to help in awarding scholarships. Some colleges strongly recommend an ACT or SAT score from homeschoolers as "proof of mommy grades".

 

Only a handful of colleges require SAT II (SAT Subject tests) from homeschoolers; some colleges require a few SAT II scores from ALL freshman applying to the school. Here's the link to the list of which colleges require / recommend / consider SATII tests. Only 29 colleges require SAT II tests; an additional 17 colleges recommend SATII tests. And an additional 57 colleges will "consider" SATII test scores.

 

So, fortunately, you don't have to worry much about SATII tests unless you plan to attend one of about 100 colleges! :)

 

 

… we can’t afford the AP classes that some places offer…  if he was still in public school it would show he is in advanced classes and then he could take the available AP courses too. I just hope we don’t end up regretting homeschooling...

 

Good news! AP does not have to be expensive!

 

You can sign up your student to take AP tests WITHOUT having taken an AP class. The AP tests are approx. $100/each, and there is AP financial aid for low income families to enable all students access to the tests. To take advantage of test-only (no class, just prep at home), you would just want to line up material for your year of study at home that has been recommended as good prep for AP testing. You would also need to line up a location about a year in advance, as not all schools have room for homeschoolers to join them at their testing site.

 

More good news! You don't NEED any APs!

 

Seriously! For college admission to most regular colleges, and even many competitive/selective schools. Several homeschoolers on this board have done GREAT getting into top tier colleges with NO APs. AND, even better -- most scholarships do NOT get awarded on AP scores! Colleges tend to award merit aid based more on ACT/SAT scores, and/or from a high PSAT score when taken in the 11th grade. So, solid practice and prep work done at home can help you there. And, if you are able to do dual enrollment later on, that's an excellent way to show high GPA and advanced work, which is also helpful towards scholarships.

 

And to further reassure you if you don't go the AP route: while many public schools do offer AP classes, it does NOT mean they are of high quality or that they are really preparing students for the AP tests. Because of the WIDE range of quality from one school to another, many colleges are not automatically assuming that just because the transcript says "AP class" that it really meant a high level of work. In fact, some colleges are no longer awarding credit, or as much credit, for AP test scores.

 

 

… the pressure of college and scholarships is building.  As a homeschool mom I am trying to plan things out for him but the competition seems overwhelming. He is really smart but when picking a homeschool curriculum I am not seeing very many that say Honors...

 

… My son is also an introvert so getting those extracurricular activities is another challenge.

 

… Having all AP or Honors classes with tons of extra community activities is way too much and for some of us homeschoolers it isn’t even an option (because of cost).  

 

I know the pressure can feel overwhelming: "MUST do many APs / honors / activities and do well in everything in order to get scholarships because college is so expensive!"  :eek:

 

But please don't panic and let that drive your high school experience. There are MANY routes to college and managing the costs:

 

- AmeriCorps -- serve a year volunteering here in the US in specific projects, and receive funds for college afterwards

- dual enrollment and transfer credits to reduce time and thus costs at the 4-year university

- live at home, work part time / school part time, take 6 years to complete the 4-year degree

- tuition-work exchange scholarships (company awards partial or full scholarship money in exchange for agreeing to work several years upon graduation) -- SMART Scholarship (work as civilian researcher for US Dept. of Defense), employer tuition assistance programs, employer tuition reimbursement programs

- complete an Associate's degree in a vocational/tech area that allows you to work at a higher wage; work full time and save, and then return for the 4-year degree

- military service for a number of years of service, discharged, and then use the GI Bill

- college exchange programs -- pay in-state tuition but go to a participating out-of-state school ISEPNSEWUE and WICHE

 

Often, having to find a work-around to our original plans ends up opening an expected door, or previously unknown door, that ends up leading to a wonderful future career. :) College is not the best or most successful path for all students. Straight to work from high school and working your way up in a company. Entrepreneurship. Vocational/tech jobs. All are VERY satisfying options for many people.

 

 

As far as extracurriculars and scholarships...

There was a great thread recently on whether or not to get involved with community service and extracurriculars just in order to try and look good for scholarships ("Choosing activities for the sake of scholarships?". The consensus there was that colleges see through doing an activity just to check off a box, and instead are looking for genuine passion, interest, and learning.

 

So when it comes to outside the home activities -- spend your resources of time and money wisely. Get involved in areas of interest for your DS, and in what helps you accomplish your goals (for example: public speaking, or community service, or part of a class credit…) Scholarships often come as a bonus, and directly out of the student's genuine interest and passion in being involved in the activity.

 

 

… The only thing I know to do is to pick a curriculum and take it one year at a time.

 

​… Thanks for all of you that posted on how important it is to enjoy these years.

 

Awesome insights, and a helpful reminder to all of us -- thank you! :) BEST of luck as you juggle those hats of administrator, homeschooler, and mom! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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Lori's post is great.

 

We know a sizable number of homeschooler teens locally, and given the number of them starting at state colleges at age 15-16-17, it really makes me scratch my head when I look at something like College Confidential.  It seems like a great deal depends on SAT/ACT scores. 

 

Dd is the only teen homeschooler we know face to face that is even taking AP at all (think 1 out of 60+).  We actually take some grief locally for "caving to the big test scam" from some fellow homeschoolers.  We chose to take AP  1 via an online class and one self study this year to allow her to learn to conform to non-mom expectations.  For Dd, this first year experience doing so has been great (whatever the test scores wind up being).  She has learned she can write on demand and found some peers to communicate with on topics she finds interesting. 

 

I draw the line at taking any class simply to wind up with a transcript that might impress.  I understand colleges want some way to quantify what a student has done with their time and guage how that might compare with other students they may be considering.  There are many ways to achieve that via homeschooling and reflect it on the transcript. 

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SO sorry to hear how rough it was! :( BUT...  :hurray:  So glad homeschooling has reduced stress for your DS! :)

 

 

 

Actually, that's NOT something you need to stress about. :)

 

Just to clarify: it's NOT the SATII (SAT Subject tests) that most colleges want. Instead, most colleges want to see either the ACT or the SAT (also known as the SAT Reasoning Test) scores from ALL high schoolers, as most colleges have a minimum score for admission to the school, AND use the scores to help in awarding scholarships. Some colleges strongly recommend an ACT or SAT score from homeschoolers as "proof of mommy grades".

 

Only a handful of colleges require SAT II (SAT Subject tests) from homeschoolers; some colleges require a few SAT II scores from ALL freshman applying to the school. Here's the link to the list of which colleges require / recommend / consider SATII tests. Only 29 colleges require SAT II tests; an additional 17 colleges recommend SATII tests. And an additional 57 colleges will "consider" SATII test scores.

 

So, fortunately, you don't have to worry much about SATII tests unless you plan to attend one of about 100 colleges! :)

 

 

 

Good news! AP does not have to be expensive!

 

You can sign up your student to take AP tests WITHOUT having taken an AP class. The AP tests are approx. $100/each, and there is AP financial aid for low income families to enable all students access to the tests. To take advantage of test-only (no class, just prep at home), you would just want to line up material for your year of study at home that has been recommended as good prep for AP testing. You would also need to line up a location about a year in advance, as not all schools have room for homeschoolers to join them at their testing site.

 

More good news! You don't NEED any APs!

 

Seriously! For college admission to most regular colleges, and even many competitive/selective schools. Several homeschoolers on this board have done GREAT getting into top tier colleges with NO APs. AND, even better -- most scholarships do NOT get awarded on AP scores! Colleges tend to award merit aid based more on ACT/SAT scores, and/or from a high PSAT score when taken in the 11th grade. So, solid practice and prep work done at home can help you there. And, if you are able to do dual enrollment later on, that's an excellent way to show high GPA and advanced work, which is also helpful towards scholarships.

 

And to further reassure you if you don't go the AP route: while many public schools do offer AP classes, it does NOT mean they are of high quality or that they are really preparing students for the AP tests. Because of the WIDE range of quality from one school to another, many colleges are not automatically assuming that just because the transcript says "AP class" that it really meant a high level of work. In fact, some colleges are no longer awarding credit, or as much credit, for AP test scores.

 

 

 

 

I know the pressure can feel overwhelming: "MUST do many APs / honors / activities and do well in everything in order to get scholarships because college is so expensive!"  :eek:

 

But please don't panic and let that drive your high school experience. There are MANY routes to college and managing the costs:

 

- AmeriCorps -- serve a year volunteering here in the US in specific projects, and receive funds for college afterwards

- dual enrollment and transfer credits to reduce time and thus costs at the 4-year university

- live at home, work part time / school part time, take 6 years to complete the 4-year degree

- tuition-work exchange scholarships (company awards partial or full scholarship money in exchange for agreeing to work several years upon graduation) -- SMART Scholarship (work as civilian researcher for US Dept. of Defense), employer tuition assistance programs, employer tuition reimbursement programs

- complete an Associate's degree in a vocational/tech area that allows you to work at a higher wage; work full time and save, and then return for the 4-year degree

- military service for a number of years of service, discharged, and then use the GI Bill

- college exchange programs -- pay in-state tuition but go to a participating out-of-state school ISEPNSEWUE and WICHE

 

Often, having to find a work-around to our original plans ends up opening an expected door, or previously unknown door, that ends up leading to a wonderful future career. :) College is not the best or most successful path for all students. Straight to work from high school and working your way up in a company. Entrepreneurship. Vocational/tech jobs. All are VERY satisfying options for many people.

 

 

As far as extracurriculars and scholarships...

There was a great thread recently on whether or not to get involved with community service and extracurriculars just in order to try and look good for scholarships.

 

The consensus there was that colleges see through doing an activity just to check off a box, and instead are looking for genuine passion, interest, and learning.

 

So when it comes to outside the home activities -- spend your resources of time and money wisely. Get involved in areas of interest for your DS, and in what helps you accomplish your goals (for example: public speaking, or community service, or part of a class credit…) Scholarships often come as a bonus, and directly out of the student's genuine interest and passion in being involved in the activity.

 

 

 

 

Awesome insights, and a helpful reminder to all of us -- thank you! :) BEST of luck as you juggle those hats of administrator, homeschooler, and mom! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

saving forever.

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saving forever.

 

Hey, now, don't do that! Don't you know those tests and college requirements keep changing?! ;)

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