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Book a Week in 2014 - BW8


Robin M
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OK, so my frustration of the day is: I did this whole long multi-quoted post, responding with great (ahem) wisdom and wit to a whole bunch of other posters' suggestions and insights and comments (we're a little thin on the GIF files so far this week, I notice), and then...

 

... as I attempted to insert a picture of our fabulous new dog...

 

THE WHOLE POST GOT EATEN.  Grrr.

 

So, I'm just going to try to do the dog, here:

 

 

 

 

 

....

 

Um.

 

OK, I think I'm ready for my tutorial on How To Post A Picture From My Desktop, please...

 

Well, I wanna see your new doggie so...

 

1. Click respond to post

2. Go to the bottom of the respond 'form' and you'll see a heading that says 'Attach Files'. Click on the little browse button and it will take you to your photo albums on your computer. Select the photo you want by clicking on the photo and then clicking the 'choose' button. The computer will redirect you back to the post response thread where you'll click 'attach this file' and you're done :D

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Does she ever actually get her philosophy club off the ground? ;)

 

I found some of her inner philosophical discussions interesting but they didn't have anything to do with the story. Or, did they and I'm just too thick to see it? :)

 

There isn't really any external philosophy club. I took that part to mean the philosophy 'club' we're all part of simply by virtue of our sentience and proclivities towards ruminating on our various life choices and experiences. She is the editor of 'The Review of Applied Ethics' and so there is a very little bit of formal philosophy sprinkled throughout the books as a result of various articles she receives and has to decide on in terms of publishing them in the review. And then there are her own thoughts on a few philosophers, she's very partial to Hume, for example.

 

I just looked at the synopsis of that first book on Amazon and I'm recalling now that I liked it in a luke-warm way but didn't read any more of the series for several months after that so that first book wasn't probably his best. However the pace continues on in the same slow, meandering way and the mysteries are more internal so if that's not your thing you won't find much to like in the subsequent books. I will say that I'm generally not a mystery lover so that might be why these books worked for me, they were mysteries in the loosest sense of the word.

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Aww... isn't he the absolute.sweetest.ever??!

 

(In real life, he's bigger, and sits upright, lol!)

 

 

Well, I wanna see your new doggie so...

 

1. Click respond to post

2. Go to the bottom of the respond 'form' and you'll see a heading that says 'Attach Files'. Click on the little browse button and it will take you to your photo albums on your computer. Select the photo you want by clicking on the photo and then clicking the 'choose' button. The computer will redirect you back to the post response thread where you'll click 'attach this file' and you're done :D

 

Thanks... maybe more practice will make more perfect...

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Whew!  I'm finally taking a moment to sit down and post.  We normally have co-op every other week.  Well we had a snow day that we had to reschedule and now we are having 3 weeks in a row of co-op.  I teach Art, Yearbook, and our Narnia Lit class.  That's a lot of planning, add to that a teen event that I had to plan last week because dh was not home...   :willy_nilly: If only I multi-tasked better!  I now have to tackle Mt. Fold That Laundry and clean the house before this weekend when I'm keeping a friend's kids for 5 days.  Oh, and we see Macbeth on Thursday at our local Shakespeare theater.  I don't normally have crazy weeks in February!  Ok, rant over.

 

So Friday I finished The Horse and His Boy for my Narnia class.  I have read through the whole series before, some of the books multiple times.  However, I did not recall the story line for this book.  It was quite an adventure!  Lewis changed the tone in this book (IMO) compared to the first four.  (We are reading in the order they were written...the only true way to read them lol).  Not only did most of the book take place away from Narnia but Lewis really explored the culture and religion of the Calormene's.  My class thought this was an allegory to show the difference between the pagan religion and Aslan (the world and Christ).  And just a side note...it is so exciting to see them growing and making connections and thoughts on their own without my digging and prompting :hurray: When we began,most didn't know what the word allegory meant.  I agreed with them, though now that I sit here typing, I believe that Lewis would not have taken that route if he had not laid such a heavy foundation of the truth in the first four books.  Another point in favor of reading them in their written order  ;)  I enjoyed the fact that we meet the Pevensie's again and seeing the glimpse into the Golden Age of Narnia.  I found I took less notes this time around and instead became immersed in the story.  Three of my 11 kids yesterday vehemently disliked this book, funny enough, it was because they thought there was less adventure.  Their reactions and observations are one of the highlights of my class.  I would give this a solid 4 stars, maybe 4.5.  

 

As I type up my "review" here, I am still amazed that I'm talking about allegory and Narnia in the same sentence.  Before I had always only enjoyed them as a great fantasy series.  I knew that there were elements that were allegorical but really kind of down played them.  Numerous times I have thought as someone else was talking, "just read the books as they are for crying out loud!"  Reading with a critical eye for my class and seeing what the kids come up with on their own, sometimes things I have not even considered, has really changed my view.  

 

1 – The Women of Christmas by Liz Curtis Higgs (Isarel)

2 – Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans (USA)

3 – The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis

 

4 – Michael Vey:  The Rise of the Elgin by Richard Paul Evans (USA/Peru)

 

5 – Soulless by Gail Carriger (England, BaW rec)

 

6 – Speaking from Among the Bones by Alan Bradley (England)

 

7 – A Morbid Taste for Bones by Ellis Peters (12th Century, England/Wales,BaW rec)

 

8 – Michael Vey: Battle of the Ampere by Richard Paul Evans (Peru)

 

9 - Divergent by Veronica Roth (USA)

 

10 - Anna of Byzantium by Tracy Barrett (Turkey, 11th/12th Century, Dusty Book)

 

11 – Austenland by Shannon Hale (England, Dusty Book)

12 - The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis

 

I am reading Inferno at a slow pace.  I find the language beautiful.  Dd and I just started Beorn the Proud as our read aloud today.  And I have The Dead in their Vaulted Arches and Etiquette and Espionage from the library waiting for me to not fall asleep the minute I fall into bed.

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There isn't really any external philosophy club. I took that part to mean the philosophy 'club' we're all part of simply by virtue of our sentience and proclivities towards ruminating on our various life choices and experiences. She is the editor of 'The Review of Applied Ethics' and so there is a very little bit of formal philosophy sprinkled throughout the books as a result of various articles she receives and has to decide on in terms of publishing them in the review. And then there are her own thoughts on a few philosophers, she's very partial to Hume, for example.

 

I just looked at the synopsis of that first book on Amazon and I'm recalling now that I liked it in a luke-warm way but didn't read any more of the series for several months after that so that first book wasn't probably his best. However the pace continues on in the same slow, meandering way and the mysteries are more internal so if that's not your thing you won't find much to like in the subsequent books. I will say that I'm generally not a mystery lover so that might be why these books worked for me, they were mysteries in the loosest sense of the word.

 

Ahhh...OK. A few times in the book, someone would ask her if she'd gotten her club together yet and she would indicate that she didn't and then someone would say, "Well, Sunday is a hard day...." So, I thought a club might materialize.

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Our dogs all seem to have the same name...'attached thumbnail' :lol:

 

Phoenix, your guy (?) is pretty darn cute and looks somewhat similar to ours. Is it a lab? Ours is a flat coat retriever.

 

 

Lol. Yes, Diego is a lab. He's about 2 1/2.

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Awww. Love all the cute doggies named Attached Thumbnail! :laugh:  They're gorgeous!

 

:hurray:

 

(Btw, Pam, if you want to teach your doggie to 'sit up' ;) , first open your photo in whatever photo program you have on your computer, rotate the photo, & save it. Then, when you attach it, it should be in the correct orientation.)

 

Also, if anyone stores their photos on a website (Picassa, Photobucket, your blog, etc...), you can right-click on your photo, select "View Image", go to the page that has just the image (.jpg or other photo ending at the end of the address) & then paste it here. (It will show up as a photo in the regular text area rather than an attached thumbnail.) Pam will have to tell how to do this for those without a mouse since she had to figure out those logistics for inserting a gif in the same manner. (Actually, Pam, I'm hoping you will repost those directions because I have an iPad I sometimes use & feel lost when I can't put in all my photos, gifs, etc....)

 

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The multiquote is just not working for me this week, so I'll resort to cut and paste.

******

"Written by Kareni I recently read a book that I enjoyed very much ~ Someone Else's Love Story is Joshilyn Jackson's funny, charming, and poignant novel about science and miracles, secrets and truths, faith and forgiveness; about falling in love and learning that things aren't always what they seem—or what we hope they will be. It's a story about discovering what we want and ultimately finding what we need."

**************

This looks really interesting, adding to my tbr list. It is also apparently very popular at my library so hopefully by the time it is available, I'll have time to read it.

**********************

"Written by Paisley Hedgehog I had a great reading week last week, finishing two five-star books. First was The Ionian Mission by Patrick O'Brian, #8 in the Aubrey / Maturn series. I loved this one -- seriously, it was my favorite of the series so far. Lots of action and little of the land-bound drama of the previous couple of entries. Second was the first of Ruth Reichl's memoirs, Tender At The Bone. Reichl is the former NYT food critic and there was plenty of food-centric writing here, but the memoir was mostly about her early years at school and university. I was hooked from the first page and read the entire book in about 36 hours. After not making it through any books in Week 6, I am chuffed to have found two great ones for Week 7. "

************************

Yeah! Glad you had a great week!

*******************

"Written by The Dinosaur Feather by S. J. Gazan- This is a Danish mystery and has some of the same feel of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (yes, I know it's a different country). I think it felt similar in the liberal sexual attitudes that are treated as very normal and because it has the same thing where there are many names that seem similar to a non-Danish reader but I'm guessing aren't that similar to a Danish reader. It's like the Johansen and Bergensen and Borgensen and Jensen and Jergensen of Dragon Tattoo. After that kind of pointless aside, I'll say I really liked it. It's a very well-done mystery with intricate backstories and a really unique method of murder. I actually found this one when I was searching for dinosaur books for my kids for something and it looked intriguing so I put it on hold. Since then I've discovered it won a big Danish award (best crime novel of the decade) and is on a bunch of U.S. best-of lists including that well-known NPR librarian woman whose name is escaping me right now. Also, I'll add that it's much less icky and disturbing than Dragon Tattoo, if you are interested but possibly worried about that comparison."

*************************

Thanks for the rec. Sounds really interesting!

**************************

"Written by PhoenixI finished The Vow this morning. It is the true story of Kim & Krickett Carpenter who were in a terrible automobile accident shortly after they were married. Krickett sustained terrible brain injury and forgets that she was ever married. It is the story of Kim Carpenter winning back his wife and staying true to his vow to be faithful to his wife. This was one my friend's books that she said I just had to read. Not typically the type of book I pick up; had it been fiction I really wouldn't have been interested. It was, however, non-fiction and it was neat testimony of the couple's faithfulness to each other and their faith in God. (I guess they made the rounds in the newspapers, magazines, and talk show circuit back in the late 90's early 2000's, but it wouldn't have been on my radar at that time. It was also made into a movie starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum in 2012, which I have not seen.) ***************************

I vaguely remember an interview or two related to the movie coming out. I've been trying to read more non-fiction, so this fits nicely into my tbr list from the library. At this rate, my computer post it is going to end up becoming my screen wallpaper! ;) *****************************

"Written by Stacia Oh, my teetering library pile! And I have so much to do this week & next that I fear I will get through very few of these. Anyone else have a big library pile right now? If so, what's in your pile?"

***********************

Sophocles - Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus

Leeds - One Year to an Organized Life

Pratchett - The Wee Free Men

Smith - The Sunday Philosophy Club

Hamilton - Mythology

Peters - One Corpse Too Many and Monk's Hood

Rollins - Map of Bones

Pargeter - The Brothers of Gwynedd (4 books in 1)

Aziz - The Perfect 10 Diet

and then on my Kindle... Eragon, the third Flavia de Luce book, and several Beth Moore books I downloaded for free last month Hence the reason I started keeping book ideas on a rapidly growing computer post it note.

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Hey, I'm out of likes!!!  What's up with that?  Is there some sort of policy rationale against sharing the love, or something?!  Everyone please consider their respective post, liked...

 

 

Very cute!! What kind is he?

 

And here's our guy as a rather pugnacious pup...and in his current manifestation.

 

The mother of our dear little Attached Thumbnail is a standard poodle.  His paternity is... uncertain...

 

Your guy is adorable, then and now!

 

Awww. Love all the cute doggies named Attached Thumbnail! :laugh:  They're gorgeous!

 

:hurray:

 

(Btw, Pam, if you want to teach your doggie to 'sit up' ;) , first open your photo in whatever photo program you have on your computer, rotate the photo, & save it. Then, when you attach it, it should be in the correct orientation.)

 

Also, if anyone stores their photos on a website (Picassa, Photobucket, your blog, etc...), you can right-click on your photo, select "View Image", go to the page that has just the image (.jpg or other photo ending at the end of the address) & then paste it here. (It will show up as a photo in the regular text area rather than an attached thumbnail.) Pam will have to tell how to do this for those without a mouse since she had to figure out those logistics for inserting a gif in the same manner. (Actually, Pam, I'm hoping you will repost those directions because I have an iPad I sometimes use & feel lost when I can't put in all my photos, gifs, etc....)

 

Since we're posting doggie photos, here are my nephews....

 

1470338_10202445262883294_265994269_n.jp1426269_771392652876395_1256274559_n.jpg

 

(My sister obviously does not know how to dress her sons, especially Zeus [the one in the clown-looking Christmas pjs]! I feel sorry for the poor dudes in their Christmas lounge-wear.) ;) :lol:

 

Nephews are adorable.  Clothes on dogs... well.  Perhaps it's regional...

 

The mystery is, Attached Thumbnail is sitting perfectly upright on iPhoto and on my desktop... he only lies down when I drag him over to the Attached File field.  I guess I could make him lie down on the desk top and hope he lands right when I attach him, though it's just as likely that he'd end up on his head! :lol:

 

Our dogs all seem to have the same name...'attached thumbnail' :lol:

 

Phoenix, your guy (?) is pretty darn cute and looks somewhat similar to ours. Is it a lab? Ours is a flat coat retriever.
 

 

Time to take AT out for a walk in the snow...

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I almost posted that my first impression immediately reminded of Griffin and Sabine. I remember reading my mom's copy. 

 

I'd forgotten all about the G&S books until I saw your post and then took a little trip back to the 90s. I recall enjoying at least the first one and then perhaps the novelty wore off? S looks like a very different story though.

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At the end of another long day of commuting and classes with quick turnarounds between them. We capped our day with a quick trip to the library (with a side trip to replenish chocolate stores) for some more audio books to keep our minds engaged and our moods even during rush traffic. Ds had several lined up and while he was perusing the children's offerings it occurred to me to check the adult section. I had such a good time with my tea, knitting and 'The Woman in White', a couple of weeks ago thanks to Jane's rec. Happily I came away with 'The Moonstone' and am looking forward to more of the same.

 

 
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I finally got started on Steve Jobs....I don't think I'm going to read it! :blushing:  I always thought the book cover made him look nice, so I thought he was nice! I mean, Apple, cool products, nice guy....it sounds like he was quite a jerk, though. I am not going to take the time reading it. My dh wants to see the movie and I think two hours will be more than enough to spend on getting to know who he was.

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Ohhh. Can't wait to hear all the reviews for S. I really want to read that one. Planning on ordering it, but my stacks are so high now that I'm trying to hold off for a bit....

 

Funny the mention of Griffin & Sabine. That set of books is a loooooong dusty set on my shelves. I bought them when they were first out because I thought they looked so cool, but I've never gotten around to reading them. They've survived quite a few book purges in this house, so perhaps I will get to them one day...

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My kids have been feeling lousy with cold and flu-type symptoms.   Because of their sickness and need to cleanse their brains after our last read-aloud (And Then There Were None), it was easy for them to talk me into a new read-aloud:  The Code of the Woosters by PG Wodehouse.  They are familiar with the characters and stories via the tv show so they are loving it.    Nothing like reading Jeeves and Wooster while wrapped in blankets on the couch. 

 

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Ok, I've decided to head back to James Rollins again to start off the week.  I've started The Devil Colony and dang it's a chunky one with The Skeleton Key novella at the end.  After that I'll probably try J. D. Robb, Concealed in Death is due out on Tuesday.  I'm going for enjoyment this week since I'm reading Chemistry, again.  Luckily I can understand Zumdahl.  The Spectrum book is driving me batty, even with the errata.  :blink:

I just received my copy of Concealed in Death so I'll be diving into Eve and Roark's world this evening.

 

Oh, my teetering library pile!

 

 

 

And I have so much to do this week & next that I fear I will get through very few of these.

 

Anyone else have a big library pile right now? If so, what's in your pile?

 

Mine is:

The Way Through Doors by Jesse Ball (in progress)

The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing (just picked up & need to read for my book club)

The Circle by Dave Eggers

The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien

Nothing: A Portrait of Insomnia by Blake Butler

The Soft Machine by William S. Burroughs

Ripper by Isabel Allende

Gang Leader for a Day by Sudhir Venkatesh

Nightmare Abbey by Thomas Love Peacock

Man or Mango? by Lucy Ellman

Why We Suck by Dr. Denis Leary

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith

Werewolves of Montpellier by Jason

 

And, of course, I have quite a few more on my request list. :leaving:

 

Just in case you need a few more ideas, here's a fun page: My Guilty Pleasure: Writers talk about the books they love but are embarrassed to be seen reading.

Why We Suck is great. Both hubby and I read it. 

 

NPR hosts Grapes of Wrath read-along (to do prior to the 75th birthday of the book in April)...

http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2014/02/17/275913549/last-chance-to-read-grapes-of-wrath-before-it-turns-75

 

Hmm!  Seeing as I have had it in my stacks for several years, April would probably be a good time to read.  Readalong anybody? Or do you want to wait til banned books month?

 

One more interesting article: Muses And More: 3 Books We Owe To Writers' Lovers

 

Ok, I had to lol about the first one (Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde -- one of my favorite books, btw) when it mentions what his wife did.... :blink:  Guess she was right, though, as I love the story as it is today!

This reminded me of when I met James Rollins at a conference and had him autograph a couple books. Mentioned how much I loved Judas Strain and he pointed at his wife and said she was Patient Zero in the story who was infected with a nasty virus. 

 

I just finished The Twelve by Justin Cronin and it was pretty good. The first half of the story dragged a bit, but it got exciting after that. Another dusty book to wipe off the list.  Finished it just in time.  Concealed in Death, the next book in J.D.Robb's In Death series just arrived.  Yeah! 

 

Speaking of J.D. Robb, Here's 5 Dark Thrillers to sooth your Valentine's Day Hangover.

 

Interesting list and thinking of adding some to my wishlist - 30 Books by Authors Under 30

 

Happy Birthday to Toni Morrison

 

 

 

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Nephews are adorable.  Clothes on dogs... well.  Perhaps it's regional...

 

:lol:  Actually, they never dress the dogs except at Christmas. Then, they go out & get some ridiculous Christmas outfits for the dogs, dress them, & take a few pics. Bil calls it the 'annual shaming of the dogs'. :laugh:  At least it's quite short-lived (maybe 20-30 minutes, max).

 

If dogs acted like cats, they wouldn't get dressed at all (or the humans would pay). :lol:

 

On the topic of cats & dogs, I'm sure you gals have seen these videos, but I'll relink them because the dc & I think they're so spot-on (& funny):

 

 

 

To keep my post slightly bookish, I will say that I rarely, if ever, read books that have animals as characters. I just can't handle sad stuff that happens to animals in books & tend to not like 'animal' based books for that reason (because most stories like that do have stuff meant to pull at your heartstrings). So, for me, no Black Beauty, or Redwall, etc.... (I know those are youth books, but still....) And, I was really hesitant about reading Life of Pi knowing the tiger was a central character (but I steeled myself & read it anyway).

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Ohhh. Can't wait to hear all the reviews for S. I really want to read that one. Planning on ordering it, but my stacks are so high now that I'm trying to hold off for a bit....

 

Funny the mention of Griffin & Sabine. That set of books is a loooooong dusty set on my shelves. I bought them when they were first out because I thought they looked so cool, but I've never gotten around to reading them. They've survived quite a few book purges in this house, so perhaps I will get to them one day...

 

 

 

 

Me too!!!  My G&S books are also dusty, unread yet very much treasured having survived purges and a move.

 

My Griffin and Sabine collection are on the bookshelves that house a large chunk of my library that has to get moved this summer when we finally replace the carpet. Carpet that is giving up after living under the antics and bodily fluids of 3 dogs and 2 boys for the last 19 years. I am sooooooo not looking forward to moving the books, but I keep telling myself it will give me a chance to organize my library and discover some dusty treasures.  

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Yoo hoo! I still have my Griffin and Sabine trilogy too!  The first of these was published when I was pregnant with College Boy!

 

Today I finished listening to an unusual Agatha Christie, Destination Unknown.  There is no Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot in this one--or an unraveling of the almost perfect murder.  The story is a Cold War thriller, dated but still enjoyable. Our heroine contemplates suicide in general despair of her life.  A British secret service agent persuades her to participate in a mission from which there is no guarantee of returning.  OK--so maybe all of the stars become impossibly aligned as we reach the novel's conclusion.  Still a good lightweight accompaniment as I was driving hither and yon.

 

33721.jpg

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Recently, there was a mention of a Silk Road Kindle book. Checking out some magazines on Zinio (love that I get to do this for free through my library because I'm a magazine junkie), one of the featured articles right now has some lovely Silk Road photos/info from Afar magazine. Enjoy!

 

http://www.zinio.com/mag-reader/article-reader.jsp?excerptId=6861424#article/6861424/100

 

-----------------------

ETA: Poking through my various magazine downloads, I see that Mental Floss mentions a gorgeous-looking book: The Library: A World History by James W. P. Campbell

 

From part of Mental Floss' review...

But The Library is no dry academic tome. There's fascinating trivia too. For instance, a colony of bats that roost behind bookcases in Portugal's Mafra Palace Library has, since the building's completion in 1771, helped protect the library's collection by feeding on insects that might otherwise damage precious volumes. Take that, bookworms!

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I got mine the other day, too. It's so cool. Which Amazon tips did you find? I've been wondering how to proceed with it!

 

This is from the first review at Amazon--I'll at least start out this way:

 

Now, J&E's notes are not entirely in chronological order. You can generally go by the color of the ink between them to tell what phase of their story you're at.

 

First, there's Eric's pencil notes to himself about the actual book. Then, the convo between J&E begins when Jen picks up Eric's book and sees his notes and begins commenting on them in the margins. He sees this and writes back. Those early messages are Jen: Blue Ink - Eric: Black Ink

 

At some point after they go through the book a first time, they go through again. This time Jen: Orange Ink - Eric: Green Ink.

 

Then a third time Jen: Purple Ink - Eric: Red Ink

 

Finally, a fourth time (which seems to be after the denouement, in which they retrospectively discuss what has transpired). These are less frequent, and both Jen and Eric are in Black Ink.

 

***Read each chapter of the main text of SoT, ignoring all of Jen & Eric's notes. Upon finishing each chapter, you're going to want to go back and read only the blue/black notes and any referenced inserts. Then, move on to the next chapter. After you finish the whole book, go back and read only the orange/green notes and referenced inserts. Then purple/red, then black/black.***

 

However you choose to approach it, you're in for a treat. Even after finishing it, I'm still going back and looking for anything I may have missed. The journey was fantastic and the the destination was, well you'll see.

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Recently, there was a mention of a Silk Road Kindle book. Checking out some magazines on Zinio (love that I get to do this for free through my library because I'm a magazine junkie), one of the featured articles right now has some lovely Silk Road photos/info from Afar magazine. Enjoy!

 

http://www.zinio.com/mag-reader/article-reader.jsp?excerptId=6861424#article/6861424/100

 

Thanks for that link, Stacia. Those pics are stunning. I just finished up the 'Lady Cyclist's...' book which took place in those parts of the world with harrowing travels included so the pics brought that alive. I notice he mentioned Eric Newby's book, 'A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush' as having a profound influence on his desire to travel to that part of the world. I *loved* that book as I mentioned here several weeks ago so it was nice to see it referred to in such glowing terms.

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Other than reading a book a week, my other goal was to read as much this year but spend less money. I have decided to check myself after every ten books. So far I have read 10 books but only bought 3 of them. Last year I bought 8 of the first 10 books I read, so I have made progress!!

 

 

 

 

Started reading:

Winter of the World by Ken Follett (this one might take me a while!)


Still reading: 

The Happiness Project: Or Why I spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun. by Gretchen Rubin

Reading and Writing Across Content Areas by Roberta Sejnost

The School Revolution: A New Answer for our Broken Education System by Ron Paul

Finished reading: 
1. The Curiosity by Stephen Kiernan (AVERAGE)
2. The Last Time I Saw Paris by Lynn Sheene (GOOD)
3. Unwind by Neal Shusterman (EXCELLENT)
4. The Husband's Secret by Liane Moriarty (EXCELLENT)
5. The Rage Against God: How Atheism Led Me to Faith by Peter Hitchens (AMAZING)
6. Champion by Marie Lu (PRETTY GOOD)
7. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink (INCREDIBLE) 

8. Cultivating Christian Character by Michael Zigarelli (HO-HUM)

9. Detroit: An American Autopsy by Charlie LeDuff (um...WOW. So amazing and sad)

10. Pressure Points: Twelve Global Issues Shaping the Face of the Church by JD Payne (SO-SO)

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This is from the first review at Amazon--I'll at least start out this way:

 

Now, J&E's notes are not entirely in chronological order. You can generally go by the color of the ink between them to tell what phase of their story you're at.

 

First, there's Eric's pencil notes to himself about the actual book. Then, the convo between J&E begins when Jen picks up Eric's book and sees his notes and begins commenting on them in the margins. He sees this and writes back. Those early messages are Jen: Blue Ink - Eric: Black Ink

 

At some point after they go through the book a first time, they go through again. This time Jen: Orange Ink - Eric: Green Ink.

 

Then a third time Jen: Purple Ink - Eric: Red Ink

 

Finally, a fourth time (which seems to be after the denouement, in which they retrospectively discuss what has transpired). These are less frequent, and both Jen and Eric are in Black Ink.

 

***Read each chapter of the main text of SoT, ignoring all of Jen & Eric's notes. Upon finishing each chapter, you're going to want to go back and read only the blue/black notes and any referenced inserts. Then, move on to the next chapter. After you finish the whole book, go back and read only the orange/green notes and referenced inserts. Then purple/red, then black/black.***

 

However you choose to approach it, you're in for a treat. Even after finishing it, I'm still going back and looking for anything I may have missed. The journey was fantastic and the the destination was, well you'll see.

That is how I read it. Fun concept...

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:lol:  Actually, they never dress the dogs except at Christmas. Then, they go out & get some ridiculous Christmas outfits for the dogs, dress them, & take a few pics. Bil calls it the 'annual shaming of the dogs'. :laugh:  At least it's quite short-lived (maybe 20-30 minutes, max).

 

If dogs acted like cats, they wouldn't get dressed at all (or the humans would pay). :lol:

 

On the topic of cats & dogs, I'm sure you gals have seen these videos, but I'll relink them because the dc & I think they're so spot-on (& funny):

 

 

 

To keep my post slightly bookish, I will say that I rarely, if ever, read books that have animals as characters. I just can't handle sad stuff that happens to animals in books & tend to not like 'animal' based books for that reason (because most stories like that do have stuff meant to pull at your heartstrings). So, for me, no Black Beauty, or Redwall, etc.... (I know those are youth books, but still....) And, I was really hesitant about reading Life of Pi knowing the tiger was a central character (but I steeled myself & read it anyway).

 

Oh my goodness.  I do believe I am myself a dog, married to a cat...

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Hey!  I got my likes back!  Woo hoo!  Like-like-like-like....

 

 

These look fabulous.  Somehow I missed this party the first time around...

 

 

 

Other than reading a book a week, my other goal was to read as much this year but spend less money. I have decided to check myself after every ten books. So far I have read 10 books but only bought 3 of them. Last year I bought 8 of the first 10 books I read, so I have made progress!!

 

 

Heather, do you or a relative back stateside have a library account that cooperates with one of the Kindle lending libraries?  We were overseas last year, and I could.not.believe how well ours worked... I couldn't get everything I wanted, of course; but our library connects to three of the systems, and between the three I could get an unbelievable range -- the basis of both the kids' schooling and our pleasure reading.  And you don't have to worry about racking up late fees, because the books.... I dunno, self-destruct or something... they disappear, poof! off the kindle once your renewals are used up.  Beautiful thing.

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Heather, do you or a relative back stateside have a library account that cooperates with one of the Kindle lending libraries? We were overseas last year, and I could.not.believe how well ours worked... I couldn't get everything I wanted, of course; but our library connects to three of the systems, and between the three I could get an unbelievable range -- the basis of both the kids' schooling and our pleasure reading. And you don't have to worry about racking up late fees, because the books.... I dunno, self-destruct or something... they disappear, poof! off the kindle once your renewals are used up. Beautiful thing.

Yes, I got hooked up through my brother back in the states. He never uses his library so I figure someone ought to use it. It is working very well and I am thrilled!

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Oh my goodness.  I do believe I am myself a dog, married to a cat...

 

He,he. I'm a cat married to a dog. I didn't post that when I first saw the videos because, you know.

 

P.S. I watched them at 5:30 this morning because I was up with insomnia. I had trouble not snorting with laughter. I don't think I will show them to the rest of my family. Too much fuel there.

 

P.S. S. My grandson has a nickname for himself and my youngest boy. They are puppy and kitty respectively, and very accurate.

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All the Griffin and Sabine talk has me thinking that it would be great to make sketch books that have empty postcards, envelopes and so forth glued in to give to the kids for Nanowrimo.  Then they can go to coffee shops and play with me.  Oh fun!

 

I did not get to read another play has I fell soundly asleep on the return trip home.  I did peak out the window sometimes and there was always a car or semi turned over in the ditch- best to sleep in those cases.

 

I've almost finished Jane Eyre and am going to see if I can't find some string technique books and Alexander technique books to read while I wait for my hands to heal.  They are better but I'm worried about picking up the violin too fast after this and then there is that beautiful cello, newly back from the shop, staring at me from across the room.  

 

And I now have Augustine's Confessions on my nook.......

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