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I can't make a poll because the number of options would be insane.

 

Which Math Program do You Use (per child, if applicable)?
Do you Assign *ALL* the problems?

If no, why?

 

We use Math Mammoth (and Keys to Math)
I assign all of the problems--In the beginning we were in it for more than just math and they learned more of what I needed them to learn by doing all of the problems. Plus, they didn't complain about it there was no reason not to.

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Singapore math for the elementary kids.  Dd8 is currently in 2B.

 

AoPS pre-A, Keys to Algebra, and Zaccaro's Real World Algebra for the 7th graders.

 

ETA:  We do all of the SM problems and most of the problems in our middle school math, but one kid refuses to try the AoPS challenge problems or the Zaccaro Einstein problems...you know, because they are labeled as such.  This would spur on some kids to want to tackle them (my other son), but it discourages this kid.

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Math Mammoth 1 and MEP 1.

 

Yes, I assign all the problems.  At this level, the repetition is as much about memorizing the answers as knowing how to find the answers, so it's important, IMO, for her to answer everything.  She needs to sit there and answer 7+2, 3+4, 8+5, etc until she knows them all front and backwards.  When she gets older and math is more about understanding the algorithms, that's when you can skip things that they already understand, I think.

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I use RightStart and it is structured differently from most math programs. There are games and timed drill sheets that are used for practicing. Each lesson has a few problems and at seventh grade level, Geometry, they are long and take a bit of time, so he does all of them. Drill is used to the extent needed, as the teacher determines.

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For my third grader and fifth grader we use Singapore Primary Math (the old US version). My 7th and 8th grader are using Singapore DM (not common core).

 

We do ALL the problems. My kids are quick at math, so in the primary levels we added in the Intensive practice books and in K through 2nd we also added in the Miquon math series to keep them from getting too far ahead too quickly. They have always been at least a.year ahead.

 

For fun we have added in different math games.

 

Over all we have been very pleased with Singapore Math.

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We use MM and while I'll occasionally let ds do just the odd or even, 90% of the time he does all of the problems because he's a kid who genuinely needs the practice.

 

My younger uses Mathematical Reasoning A and yes, she does them all. She'll be starting MM 1A very soon though, and I'll play it by ear as to whether I expect her to do all of them or just some.

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Singapore Math 3A (ds7) and 4B (ds8) - I have the HIG but we mainly use the textbook and workbook only - I assign all of the workbook problems, but we don't usually go through all the textbook problems. We also don't do every single problem in the review sections - only selected topics that I know need reinforcement.

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Oldest did Right Start B & C, then Singapore 3A-8A.

 

With Singapore PM, she did the textbook (all problems) + CWP (all problems) + IP (all of the word problems and "take the challenge" sections, some of the grade-level problems). With PM 3A-5A, I supplemented 1-3 chapters per book with some of the MM "blue" worktexts (Multiplication 2, Division 2, Fractions 1 & 2, Percents) because I didn't feel that the Singapore teaching was incremental enough. Bill (SpyCar) will claim that the issue is I wasn't using the SM workbook. However, the workbook doesn't have any extra TEACHING, only extra problems. If the issue I had is that Singapore skips from point A to point E without first walking the child through the intermediate points B-D, doing additional practice problems at Point A isn't going to make the leap any easier.

 

With Singapore Discovering Math she does all the problems in the textbook, and then uses the workbook 1 semester behind to add review. In the workbook, she does all of the "challenging practice" and "enrichment" sections, selected problems from the "further practice" section, and skips the "basic practice" problems. In DM 7, I supplemented with Horizons Pre-Algebra to add "spiral" review. I gave her the Horizons tests to see which topics she needed work on, and then assigned lessons that had those topics. In DM 8, I am using Larson's "Beginning Algebra" as a supplement.

 

DS did MEP Reception and most of 1A, then Right Start B and the first part of C in combo with Singapore 1 & 2. He then switched to a combo of SM 3 & 4 with BA 3. He does all the SM textbook + all the CWP + all the harder problems in the IP & some of the grade-level ones. With BA, it really depends on the topic. For topics that he's already seen in SM, I only assign the "out-of-the-box" ones. For the other topics, he does all of the BA problems. He may wind up outpacing the publication of BA, in which case I'll probably have him complete up through SM 5. At that point, I'll make the decision about whether to keep him in SM vs. switch him over to AOPS Pre-Algebra vs. put him in Elements of Mathematics (which hopefully should have most of the units out by then).

 

Both my kids use supplements from LoF, Zaccaro, Critical Thinking Press, and LHS Family Math but I don't assign those.

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All three of my big kids use Singapore Primary Mathematics. They do all of the problems in the workbook and CWP. We do problems selectively in the textbook. We generally do all of the problems (either orally or on the white board) when learning a new concept, but I only make them do the first column of problems in the textbook reviews. If they get the first column correct to show that they still have those skills then they can move on, but if they miss any in the first column then they have to do all of the problems for practice and review.

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MUS Delta for the 9 year old, Beta for the 7 year old and Alpha for the 5 year old. I tend to pick and choose with problems. If a kid needs to do all the problems to be accurate and confident then we do them all. If they clearly understand after the first worksheet, I'll get them to do the second, and a review sheet or two and move on. If not, we do them all, and I supplement if needed. So my 9 year old did probably 2/3rds of Gamma, more of Delta where as my 7 year old did every single problem in every book and more. 

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If using Saxon Math 54 and up, all the problems, all the time, without fail.

 

If using Rod and Staff, evens and odds on drills, all the word problems.

 

ETA: I require all the problems when using Saxon because they are not extra or drill; each problem in every problem set has a purpose, and skipping problems means we're missing practice or concept development. This doesn't count the math facts drills that are done separate and apart from the lesson.

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DD9 did Saxon K-2 in PS K at age 4, Singapore 1A-5B, plus 6 CWP, LOF Fractions, Decimals/Percents, and both Pre-Algebras, and is now using AOPS Pre-Algebra. Mathletics as review/practice/mental math for the last couple of years once DD discovered the World Ed games.

 

As far as number of problems assigned, it varies. For SM, we compressed a lot where appropriate, and if she didn't need it, did the IP instead of the workbook (and often didn't do all the textbook problems) For LOF and AOPS, we do it all.

 

Plus lots of other stuff-Zaccaro, Penrose the Cat, Danica McKeller, The Algebra Survival Guide, CML and Math COunts and Math Kangaroo practice, lots of living math books, Hands on Equations,

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ds9 uses Beast Academy and the Key to books.  All the problems in those (or nearly, I have occasionally let him skip a page or a few in the Key to books).

 

Other ds9 is between programs at the moment, using the Key to books in the meantime.

 

I have in the past used MM, MEP, Primary Math, and Miquon.  I always did all the problems in Miquon, but not in the others.  In MM, we'd never have gotten anywhere if we tried to do them all.

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All mine use CLE and do every problem including the -01 LightUnits.

 

I have used pretty much every math program out there for different kids. They always did every problem. Practice, practice, practice!

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For elementary I don't intend to use any set curriculum because I'm yet to find one which I like completely enough. We will probably use mathematical reasoning as our 'core' plus miquon, life of fred, and some singapore supplements like speed math and challenging word problems, and some sort of fact memory aid like a time based game or something, along with some living math activities like games, manipulatives with prompts, and maybe kitchen table math or something.

 

Naturally, drawing from so many resources means we definitely won't do all the questions.

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Kindergarten son using Primary Math, I assign all problems in both the textbook and workbook, we only do some of the activities in the HIG as he seems to be grasping the concepts at this point. He is also doing Miquon orange, we do one or two pages a week and have skipped some pages.

 

Earlier this year when he was doing Essential Math (SM kindergarten), I skipped quite a bit especially in book A, a lot of the concepts were at more of a preschool level.

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For DD, Saxon 7/6 and she does all the problems including the five-minute facts drills with each lesson.

 

For DS, you're going to think I'm crazy here, but he loves math.  He does Saxon 7/6, LOF Decimals and Percents, CTC's Math Reasoning, Scholastic Word Problems, Key to Decimals, Murderous Maths books, and he takes pre-algebra at a co-op.  And yes, he does all the problems.  Did I mention he loves math? :D

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We began homeschooling when my daughter was in 7th grade.  That year we did a hodgepodge for math.

 

8th grade: Lial's Beginning Algebra -- selected problems

 

9th grade: Harold Jacobs' Geometry (2nd edition) -- selected problems

 

10th grade: Lial's Intermediate Algebra -- selected problems

 

11th grade: College Algebra and Trigonometry at the local community college using Sullivan's Precalculus -- problems assigned by the professors

 

12th grade: AP Statistics through PA Homeschoolers -- problems assigned by the instructor

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Different programs at different times, currently AoPS is the official spine at the growing forward edge, and other things are being used as needed--with Math Detective B1 as the supplement du jour, or perhaps of the month (and enjoys most favored nation, I mean math, status), and a Spectrum workbook too to keep review of basics going.

 

As many problems as are needed to learn the material. If mastered early, move on without doing all the problems. If more problems are needed or a different approach, add in what is needed.

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Currently A Beka Arithmetic through 3rd grade.  (Not sure what I'll do next year.)  All the problems for the 1st grader, and this will continue in 2nd grade, but not the "green ones" (extra practice) for the 3rd grader - it feels like overkill and becomes counter-productive with my non-math-loving 3rd grader.

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We use CLE LightUnits. We started the year doing every problem (this is our first hs year). But because dd is a quick learner and CLE uses tons of review, we recently switched it up. Now she completes the new material (all problems) for two lessons at a time, three days per week. (CLE only introduces one small concept per lesson.) One day per week, she does the review section from one lesson to keep her skills fresh. On the last day, we added Beast Academy for more challenge (all the problems there). She also is required to correct any mistakes from the previous day's lesson, complete a speed drill (addition, subtraction, or multiplication), and study flash cards every day.

 

She was getting bored and making lots of careless errors before Christmas. She is much happier now.

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We've used MM for the last year. It depends on the page whether or not I have her do all of the problems or not. Since MM1 is mostly stuff she already knows or just practicing math facts we skip a lot. She practices math facts on Sumdog. We also read LoF, but I don't feel like it's really contributed much to our curriculum.

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Saxon for one child -- yes, all the problems, but I have her do 1-20 one day, then 21-30 and 1-10 of the next lesson the next day, then 11-30 of the second lesson of the third day.

 

Singapore for another child -- all of the problems in the workbook, a handful of the textbook.

 

MEP for another child -- eh, not always all of the exercises, depends on what they are and how into it he is. He's only five, though.

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My eldest is juggling Singapore 4A, Challenging Word Problems 3, Beast Academy, Singapore Intensive Practice, and Life of Fred Fractions. It sounds like a lot but it doesn't take long. Normally he does 3 of them and it takes less than 20 minutes. Today for instance he did a lesson in 4A, 2 pages of Beast Academy with all easy problems, and 3 problems in Challenging Word Problems. I use CWP and IP as review so problems are skipped in thos books. No problems are ever skipped in Beast Academy. Sometimes I let him skip problems in the regular book depending on the topic. There are even times I let him skip entire lessons. He'll touch on those topics again anyway in the IP and CWP without torturing him with the easy problems in the standard workbook.

 

My daughter is using Singapore 1A. She needs all of the practice she can get so no problems are skipped. I don't like CWP level 1 so we don't use it although now that I think about it, it could be a good fit for her. She has tried Life of Fred but doesn't like the math problems. We may pick it back up again someday.

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Adding:

 

I think some programs are meant to have all problems done (perhaps Saxon and AoPS fit this). Others deliberately provide what may be extra practice if needed for some children, but do not necessarily expect all problems to be done by all children, and may also have extra online problems available if even more is needed (perhaps MUS, MM, Chalkdust, Lials). Others have extra whole books for extra practice (Singapore).

 

In B&M school, kids may have to do all the problems, even if something is busy work, and on the other hand, if the class is ready to move on, even if one child is not, may be left lost in math. Homeschool gives the opportunity to move at the child's own pace with as much as is needed, whether that is more or less than "all the problems."

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Older children...Singapore Math, made them do all the problems. Did not quite finish 6B before we gave up and moved on to Jacob's Algebra. 

 

Middle children...started with Singapore. They hated it. They revolted at one point and both refused to do anything thing. We moved to Math U See. It was fine. There was no reason to switch other than curiosity about other programs (which, btw, is not a good reason to switch!). Horizon's math now. I am not loving it. It is a great program, but realistically, about half the problems need to be skipped. My older child learns quickly and retains. He is insisting on staying with Horizons, so, I have decided I will suck it up and start crossing out problems and skipping lessons. I hate doing this. This is all new territory for me, to skip things. Not quite sure what I will use next time.

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Life of Fred & Jousting Armadillos for the oldest, Life of Fred & Zaccaro Primary Challenge Math for the youngest. Yes, they do all the problems. Generally, ds does 3 days of Fred and then one of JA, while the youngest does a Fred lesson every day (4 days a week), followed by a 5-problem set from Zaccaro.

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DS1 is in 4th grade and we use Saxon 5/4 with him. Generally, he gets through 3 lessons per week. Some weeks are slower than others, though. We also use Kumon G4 workbooks. Right now he is working on the "Decimals and Fractions" book 2-3 pages per week and does "Word Problems" 1-2 pages per week. We do Minute Maths Drills from a variety of books + mom-made sheets and focus on a different skill each month. This month we are working on triple and quadruple digit subtraction. He also likes Math Mysteries and Puzzle books, so I will often give him a problem or riddle from one of those whenever I sense that he needs the extra stimulation.

 

DD is in 2nd grade and uses Singapore 2B. I don't really keep track of how long it takes her to get through a book or what pace she works at. She loves math, but I stress mastery and memory, so this keeps her from going too fast. She also does Kumon. Right now, she is doing G2 "Word Problems" 2-3 pages per week and Kumon G3 "Addition and Subtraction" 2-3 pages per week. She does Minute Maths drills every day, usually multiplication or missing number puzzles. Most of hers are mom-made to focus on skills that she needs to master. We alternate Aba-conundrums (done on her own) and Problem-of-the-day exercises (done with her older brother) for extra work.

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C10 (5th grade)- Singapore 6B, has used Singapore all along. Also using LOF Pre-Algebra with Biology and Alcumus. 

 

H7 (2nd grade)- Singapore 2B, also doing LOF elementary series, just finished Goldfish. 

 

We have used Singapore as the core all along. We’ve also used LOF, some Zaccaro, various games and Beast Academy. 

 

I don’t assign all the problems all the time. It depends on the type of problems and the kid and the topic. We primarily just use the IP books for Singapore. I sometimes assign problems from the TB or WB depending on the topic and I use the WB reviews as “testsâ€. I’ll often assign every other problem in the IP book. If they are problems that require more thinking I assign them all. I assign all the word problems. They do all the LOF problems but there aren’t many of those. 

 

I just don’t see a point in assigning 20 problems of say multiplying multi-digit numbers. If I assign 10 and they get them all right, they obviously get the idea and we can move on. If they miss them then they get more assigned the next day because it’s something they need to work on. They will use the skill again in word problems, etc so I’m not really worried about the practice. When they are learning a brand new skill, like converting fractions, Iâ€ll assign more problems than usual to ensure they really get how to do it. 

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With Singapore PM, she did the textbook (all problems) + CWP (all problems) + IP (all of the word problems and "take the challenge" sections, some of the grade-level problems). With PM 3A-5A, I supplemented 1-3 chapters per book with some of the MM "blue" worktexts (Multiplication 2, Division 2, Fractions 1 & 2, Percents) because I didn't feel that the Singapore teaching was incremental enough. Bill (SpyCar) will claim that the issue is I wasn't using the SM workbook. However, the workbook doesn't have any extra TEACHING, only extra problems. If the issue I had is that Singapore skips from point A to point E without first walking the child through the intermediate points B-D, doing additional practice problems at Point A isn't going to make the leap any easier.

 

 

 

When one skips a "core" element of a program, one that is required, expected, not optional or "supplementary," and then complains about lack of "incrementalism" it is hard to take the charge seriously.

 

The Workbooks are designed to provide incremental learning through carefully graded problems that a child ought to be able to do independently. It is not Direct Instruction (as in the Textbook), but Direct Instruction is not the only way for a student to "learn." The Workbook problems start off easier than the Textbook problems (by design) so that students gain confidence applying the lessons through incremental practice.

 

By skipping an essential and required part of the program you are doing a child who needs the incremental learning the Workbooks provide a disservice. To then––on a public forum––advise people to follow your unsuccessful path of skipping over the Workbooks in favor of the Intensive Practice books (when it has not worked for you) and to criticize a famously methodical math program for not being incremental (when you've skipped the incremental part) strikes me as completely unjust to Primary Mathematics. And bad advice.

 

By skipping the Workbooks you've created a problem of your own making. It is what would be expected for all but the most math intuitive kids. I get that this forum has some math intuitive kids that do skip the Workbooks, but that goes against the way the program was designed to work. 

 

It is quite incorrect that doing the Workbook problems doesn't make mastering the concepts earier. That is the whole point of these books. You just, for what-ever-unknown reason, decided to skip them, and then complain when the to-be-expected repercussions followed.

 

This is on you.

 

Bill 

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We use Singapore Standards Edition.  I use the HIG religiously.  I read each lesson ahead of time and I go through each point as suggested and we do the enrichments in the HIG as well.  He also does all of the mental math sheets from the HIG as assigned.  We use the textbook and workbook and he does all problems with both books.  We use CWP one year behind and all problems are required.  He has started to complain about bar models.  He knows how to do them, but doesn't like them.  I allow him to complete the problems using whatever method works best for him, however if he struggles or gets it incorrect, we go to bar models to get the answer.  We also do Life of Fred, and he does all problems.  

We have used Singapore since K, and have supplemented with Miquon, IP, MEP and MM along the way for extra challenges or extra practice.  In hindsight, we probably didn't need more than Singapore but he just whips through it so fast, that it felt like I should add other things that were on the same topic but more challenging.  MM did help during the last geometry section where I felt like he needed more practice.  We do Life of Fred because he loves it and it's fun.  Singapore will always be our main math spine.  I was temped for a minute by MIF, but then I wondered why I would change something that is working so well.

 

Now that we're in 4A, I have to say that I'm very impressed with how well it's going.  He can do mental math (double and triple digit multiplications) that will make some think he is a genius, but he's just using what Singapore has taught him.  ;)

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One child does rod and staff (all the problems), CWP, and MEP (we do all the problems except the few Mom can't figure out--those we skip:-P

 

One child does CLE and MEP (we do them all because I've already figured out the tricky ones with the first child)

 

We have also used some Right start.

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Well, to be honest, I guess I'll admit that we skip a lot. We do pretty much all of BA, and we've used Right Start, some Key To, some MM, some MiF. But, if she gets the concept and can compute the answers without a problem, I am just not interested in continuing to make her do more. She's extremely workbook averse, and I see no reason to make her do the work just because it's there. 

 

To be honest, we kinda skipped a lot of 1st-2nd grade math. I mostly did living math with some Right Start focusing on all the mental math strategies, but I am sure my approach would horrify many. Then we just jumped into BA, and she thrived. It's like we finally found the right thing. Now we've run out BA so we're kinda floundering again. I'm doing Charlotte Mason Business Math to practice percents/decimals, and it's far more interesting to her than workbooks. I'm trying to decide whether to get Singapore 5a/5b or just jump ahead and give Jousting Armadillos a try (she's not mentally ready for AoPS pre-algebra). We looked at Singapore again the other day in the local homeschool store, and we both kinda just stared at each other. So, I ordered Jousting Armadillos instead and thought we'd see how it goes.

 

She gets math concepts really quickly, and is especially good at fractions, divisions, decimals, and percents. She likes math so much more now that we got beyond addition/subtraction/multiplication, but I'd say she's pretty asynchronous with her processing speed (no matter what it is), and I just can't see holding her back and making her miserable when she nails the ones I give her without a problem. I usually skip through and handpick different problems highlighting different things.

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