Jump to content

Menu

Public School at Home? K12 in Particular


Recommended Posts

I am curious as to what are the pros and cons public schooling at home.  This is an option in our state for free, and, because of finances, we might need to use it after 7 years of homeschooling on our own.

 

Has anyone on here done it?  What did you like/dislike? 

 

I have also heard of controversy about whether or not these charter schools are a good idea.  I would love the hear people's thought on that as well.

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am curious as to what are the pros and cons public schooling at home.  This is an option in our state for free, and, because of finances, we might need to use it after 7 years of homeschooling on our own.

 

Has anyone on here done it?  What did you like/dislike? 

 

I have also heard of controversy about whether or not these charter schools are a good idea.  I would love the hear people's thought on that as well.

 

Thanks

 

K12 itself is not public school at home. You can buy it, the same way you'd buy ABeka or BJUP.

 

It's enrolling your children in a home-based charter school that is public school at home.

 

The important thing to remember is that if you enroll your children in the charter school, they are legally public school students, not homeschooled (or private schooled) children. A surprising number of people do not understand this.

 

I would not have enrolled my children in a charter school. I would have found a way to teach them privately, because I would not have been willing to give up my freedom (e.g., no testing, no requirements to check in with anyone, no requirements to keep track of days or hours, and so on).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a couple of people who have used it, who later switched to "traditional" homeschooling because they found the documentation and attendance requirements to be overwhelming.   They didn't have a problem with the K12 curriculum itself - just the time and details involved in recording everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a couple of people who have used it, who later switched to "traditional" homeschooling because they found the documentation and attendance requirements to be overwhelming.   They didn't have a problem with the K12 curriculum itself - just the time and details involved in recording everything.

 

"just the time and details involved in recording everything." They have to do that because the children are enrolled in a public school. It has nothing to do with K12. :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a couple of people who have used it, who later switched to "traditional" homeschooling because they found the documentation and attendance requirements to be overwhelming.   They didn't have a problem with the K12 curriculum itself - just the time and details involved in recording everything.

I just left a charter school using K12 and returned to a charter school that offers independent study. The independent charter also requires documentation and attendance, but on a more reasonable level.  Using K12 I began to feel like a rat on an attendance, quiz taking wheel. The curriculum is good, but the charter school part is not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is in 1st grade through a K12 school in our state. We pulled him out of ps for a variety of reasons and while homeschooling has always been an interest of mine, my DH has not been in favor of it. K12 through a public school in our state is our compromise. So far, the requirements are minimal and the requirements that do exist have not been onerous for us. We have been pleased with the curriculum and materials.

 

I understand that each state has K12 schools that are run differently and some sound like they have many more requirements and rules than ours. So far, it's a good fit for us, although I also understand that the requirements get more strict as kids get into the older grades, so I'm not sure whether we will stick with them long-term. But for now, it's been fine. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand that each state has K12 schools that are run differently and some sound like they have many more requirements and rules than ours. So far, it's a good fit for us, although I also understand that the requirements get more strict as kids get into the older grades, so I'm not sure whether we will stick with them long-term. But for now, it's been fine. 

 

States don't have K12 schools. They have charter schools, most of which are public schools and so must follow state laws regarding attendance, testing, etc. Some of these charters use K12; some don't. It is the public charter school part that is important, not the fact that their students use K12.

 

And not all states have charter schools, on-line or campus-based.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

States don't have K12 schools. They have charter schools, most of which are public schools and so must follow state laws regarding attendance, testing, etc. Some of these charters use K12; some don't. It is the public charter school part that is important, not the fact that their students use K12.

 

And not all states have charter schools, on-line or campus-based.

The State of Florida, and then each county provides other virtual options.

 

They are not charters, they are state schools. Our requirements come from FLVS (in our case), the course work and structure is provided by Connections Academy, but our teachers work for FLVS, which is a FL public school that isn't a charter.

 

Our county discontinued use of K12 last July. I was bummed. Connections hasn't been as bad as I expected - in some ways better for us than K12 might have ended up.

 

I'd much rather be HSing her traditionally.... but this is what I can do, so we do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

States don't have K12 schools. They have charter schools, most of which are public schools and so must follow state laws regarding attendance, testing, etc. Some of these charters use K12; some don't. It is the public charter school part that is important, not the fact that their students use K12.

 

What I meant by my statement is that schools that use the K12 curriculum exist in various states. Yes, they are by and large public schools run by charter school boards or school districts. In our case, ours in MN is run by a school district. The schools that use the K12 curriculum in various states vary in terms of their requirements and rules. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I meant by my statement is that schools that use the K12 curriculum exist in various states. Yes, they are by and large public schools run by charter school boards or school districts. In our case, ours in MN is run by a school district. The schools that use the K12 curriculum in various states vary in terms of their requirements and rules. 

 

It is still a public school, as are the schools in other states. They are not "run by charter school boards." They are charter schools.

 

That they use K12 is irrelevant to the situation. Some on-line charter schools use Connections Academy. Some charter schools allow the parents to use their own materials, usually purchased by some sort of a stipend. All of them are charter schools, and the same attendance, testing, etc., will apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

K12 itself is not public school at home. You can buy it, the same way you'd buy ABeka or BJUP.

 

It's enrolling your children in a home-based charter school that is public school at home.

 

The important thing to remember is that if you enroll your children in the charter school, they are legally public school students, not homeschooled (or private schooled) children. A surprising number of people do not understand this.

 

I would not have enrolled my children in a charter school. I would have found a way to teach them privately, because I would not have been willing to give up my freedom (e.g., no testing, no requirements to check in with anyone, no requirements to keep track of days or hours, and so on).

 

Interestingly, both our district's homeschool charter and its correspondence program call their families homeschoolers.

 

"ABCD is a K-12 program that implements support, resources and opportunities for homeschooling families. With the help of a ABCD advisor, homeschool parents design and manage their student's education. Our advisors support and advocate for homeschool parents. Students may work entirely at home or they can participate in supplementary instruction held in the schools’ classrooms, gym, labs, as well as other educational institutions and community venues. ABCD continually seeks resources for home school students through developing partnerships with community members and organizations. ABCD is a K-12 Home-School Program supporting both home and school based learning."

 

"XYXY provides all the benefits of home schooling and distance delivery education, plus professional and personal support. We offer local, individualized, and flexible programs for Kindergarten through 12th grade with accredited high school courses, and 40 years of experience serving [local] student."

 

We are "public school at home" in the sense that we are enrolled with the school district, must take the end-of-year state benchmark tests, must file immunizations, and must report grades/work samples to a contact teacher.

 

We are homeschoolers in the sense that we choose our own curricula, don't need to report attendance, can design our own courses for credit, and assign our own grades.

 

Your definition of homeschooler is not the one that everyone uses. And you know this; it has been pointed out dozens of times that I've seen you argue the distinction. I would say nearly every person on this forum who uses a public charter or similar type of program considers themselves a homeschooler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not used this program myself, but a friend pulled her kids out of something similar (it was called Connections Academy) because they were not willing to work off-grade level with her son who has auspergers (sp?), ADD, and sensory issues. He was three years behind grade level in math but was forced to work at grade level because they could not make accommodation for him. The parents were told that they could before they enrolled, and then informed that a new OH law prevented this. I am only telling you this in case this would influence your decision. I would ask very specifically about working off grade level if I was going to ever consider it, but for an opposite reason--my kids are above grade level in a couple subjects, and on grade level in others.  Otherwise, I do have another friend who used K12 and liked it--but her daughter did not have any learning/sensory/behavior issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interestingly, both our district's homeschool charter and its correspondence program call their families homeschoolers.

 

"ABCD is a K-12 program that implements support, resources and opportunities for homeschooling families. With the help of a ABCD advisor, homeschool parents design and manage their student's education. Our advisors support and advocate for homeschool parents. Students may work entirely at home or they can participate in supplementary instruction held in the schools’ classrooms, gym, labs, as well as other educational institutions and community venues. ABCD continually seeks resources for home school students through developing partnerships with community members and organizations. ABCD is a K-12 Home-School Program supporting both home and school based learning."

 

"XYXY provides all the benefits of home schooling and distance delivery education, plus professional and personal support. We offer local, individualized, and flexible programs for Kindergarten through 12th grade with accredited high school courses, and 40 years of experience serving [local] student."

 

We are "public school at home" in the sense that we are enrolled with the school district, must take the end-of-year state benchmark tests, must file immunizations, and must report grades/work samples to a contact teacher.

 

We are homeschoolers in the sense that we choose our own curricula, don't need to report attendance, can design our own courses for credit, and assign our own grades.

 

Your definition of homeschooler is not the one that everyone uses. And you know this; it has been pointed out dozens of times that I've seen you argue the distinction. I would say nearly every person on this forum who uses a public charter or similar type of program considers themselves a homeschooler.

 

Please note that I was not defining "homeschooler." I was pointing out the legal difference between a child enrolled in a public school and a child who is not. Please do not read more into my comments than what I intended.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is still a public school, as are the schools in other states. They are not "run by charter school boards." They are charter schools.

 

That they use K12 is irrelevant to the situation. Some on-line charter schools use Connections Academy. Some charter schools allow the parents to use their own materials, usually purchased by some sort of a stipend. All of them are charter schools, and the same attendance, testing, etc., will apply.

Ellie, this is not true in all states.  My state has not allowed charter schools by law (we have finally voted to allow their first one later this year) but they have had online schools including ones that use K12 for years.  Yes, these schools are public schools but they are not charter schools.  They are online public schools in this state.  In some states they are online public charter schools.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Each state does it differently and each year and sometimes each semester changes happen.  The best way for you to find out is to join a local yahoo/google group which is a support group for your local K12 virtual academy.

 

Pros:

The teacher will help you nag and chide (so it help preserves the parent/child relationship if you have a strong willed child). 

My kids thrive on peer pressure

Request for acceleration was relatively easy

Foreign languages are offered from Kindergarten (that may vary by state, mine offers Latin, Spanish, French and German)

Free speech and LD evaluations

Free speech theraphy if needed, admin experienced with 504 and IEP paperwork

For high school, a friend's daughter had done 9th at high school, 10th with K12 virtual academy (due to bullying) and 11th back at the same high school with no problems.  The high school does run differently though from K-8.

It is possible to do school work anywhere there is a free Wi-Fi connection.  We had done school work at library, Starbucks, McDonalds, hotels and even airports by just bringing a laptop, pencils and a notepad.

 

Cons:

the usual bureaucracy and paperwork

not much leeway to slow down but free help is available if you make the effort to request it.

no textbooks, material mainly online.

the online system can be cranky at times :lol:

just like public school, you can get a good fit teacher assigned to you or a not so good fit (you can request a change of teacher if you really can't stand each other)

 

Since your children take piano, the music curriculum would be easy.  Someone said K12 History follows SOTW but I don't know since my kids dislike both. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ellie, this is not true in all states.  My state has not allowed charter schools by law (we have finally voted to allow their first one later this year) but they have had online schools including ones that use K12 for years.  Yes, these schools are public schools but they are not charter schools.  They are online public schools in this state.  In some states they are online public charter schools.  

 

::sigh::

 

Ok, they aren't all "charter" schools. They are still *public* schools, whether they are "charter" schools or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ABCD is a K-12 program

Are you sure they are referring to a program that utilizes the K12 curriculum? The company is called K12. K-12 means "kindergarten through twelfth grade." If they are, in fact, referring to the K12 curriculum, they need to copyedit their website.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trudence1, just to be sure, are you aware of the Virtual Homeschool Group? It provides free online classes, both at your own pace and synchronous (meet with the entire class in a virtual classroom on a regular basis).

 

I am considering having my daughter take a few online classes through our local public school next year and am watching to see if our state gets our first virtual charter for 2015, in large part due to finances for things like AP and foreign language. It's similar to the reasons I'm considering dual enrollment when she's old enough (interestingly, few folks seem to to question DE). In both instances she would be a public school student, part time for the first and full time for the second. We already use several outside classes, so I am familiar with working with someone else's schedule, someone else's syllabus, and we already test yearly,so that part is not foreign. She will have to do any required year end tests even as a part time stdent if she takes classes that require it. It will definitely mean a change to our lifestyle, but not as much as full time attendance at a b&m school (note that I don't think that's necessarily a bad option either). We actively seek out secular options when possible,so that's actually a plus for us. One of the big reasons I'm considering this, for instance, is that I cannot find any high school science for homeschoolers locally that is not Apologia, which is just not an option for us. If I have to go online for science, I might as well look at the resources available to me for free through the school system.

 

Personally, I think that it may be easier for us to step in to doing this for high school, since there is usually more flexibility in course choice at that level. My main concern is the way in which the classes are taught. For the part time program it is all at your own pace with computer scoring and teacher availability for some tutoring if needed. I can see that working okay for us for some classes but not others. At this point, it looks like the virtual charter if approved will include more teacher interaction including at least some level of synchronous classes, which works better for us.

 

For your younger kids especially, find out how much teaching you will be expected to do vs their online teacher. For me, outsourcing is only really attractive if someone else is actually doing the teaching and grading. I don't know if I would feel the trade off of flexibility would be worth it to me otherwise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought the K-12 curriculum to use independently, because our state (MO) does not subsidize it. My son really enjoys using it, and I can add his study time on each module within the program. There are built in mastery tests, too.  The cost for a full year is about $1400. To add the fifth grade materials will be about $350, which I plan to do as soon as he has completed the rest of the fourth grade (far advanced from what our PS offers for fourth grade). The online portion, then, will be supported for the entire year so that you can progress at whatever rate you wish, and potentially he can complete two grades for $1700.

 

When we move to Georgia, I plan to sign up for the state supported K-12. The program is the same, wherever or however you do it.

If you haven't used K-12 or have not seen the materials, there is a wonderful demo program you can preview with no obligation.

 

I do want to add that there are textbooks and materials provided along with the online program. They sent 60 pounds of them, in fact!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a homeschool-charter refugee :)

 

Homeschool-public charter programs vary widely in terms of what they offer and what they expect.  I think these programs can be helpful for parents who benefit from outside accountability and who have children who are working at or near grade level.  Depending on the school, they can be disastrous for students working significantly below grade level in English or math.  

 

In some charters (like the one we left) there is far LESS flexibility in terms of meeting grade level expectations than in a traditional B&M school.  Your student will still have to take standardized tests, and you'll have to teach to the standards (for most of us that means Common Core).

 

On the bright side, ours offered us a lot of money per student ($1,600/yr) for curriculum and extracurriculars like dance and some sports.  Some charters also offer onsite classes (google "university model" schools), which are pretty cool.

 

Ultimately, we left because it was destroying my daughter's confidence.  She's working solidly one grade level behind where they decided she should be, and they turned the pressure up to High.  DD shut down.  After many discussions with the powers that be, I realized that they didn't care about my daughter, they cared about her test scores- period.

 

We left last spring, and I've never looked back.  As it turns out, now that the pressure is off, she's making much faster progress in the key areas.  It helps that I no longer have to teach to the test, and instead I'm free to teach to the child. :)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the quality of these programs, K12, Connections Academy, etc., varies, wildly, from state to state. And from grade to grade. There is a link in this thread to a New  York Times article. I believe that article is based on a study done by some people in the University of Colorado. The results of these schools, in general, are typically not good for the student. The financial results for the company, K12, are excellent.

 

If we were Texas residents, quite possibly, we would have applied for the Texarkana ISD Virtual Academy.  They are using Calvert. I believe the teachers all work for the Texarkana ISD. Since I'm an "Overseas Texan", that wasn't a possibility for us, when the B&M private school DD was attending deteriorated and we decided to pull her out of there.

 

The majority, but not all, of the reviews I've read about these programs that are paid for by a state are Negative. That is so sad, because the states are paying a huge amount of money for these programs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the quality of these programs, K12, Connections Academy, etc., varies, wildly, from state to state. And from grade to grade. There is a link in this thread to a New  York Times article. I believe that article is based on a study done by some people in the University of Colorado. The results of these schools, in general, are typically not good for the student. The financial results for the company, K12, are excellent.

 

If we were Texas residents, quite possibly, we would have applied for the Texarkana ISD Virtual Academy.  They are using Calvert. I believe the teachers all work for the Texarkana ISD. Since I'm an "Overseas Texan", that wasn't a possibility for us, when the B&M private school DD was attending deteriorated and we decided to pull her out of there.

 

The majority, but not all, of the reviews I've read about these programs that are paid for by a state are Negative. That is so sad, because the states are paying a huge amount of money for these programs.

 

K12 is the same. It's the charter school requirements which make the difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you sure they are referring to a program that utilizes the K12 curriculum? The company is called K12. K-12 means "kindergarten through twelfth grade." If they are, in fact, referring to the K12 curriculum, they need to copyedit their website.

No, I never said they use k12 curriculum. They are a kindergarten-grade 12 program that serves (in their words) homeschoolers. My point is that they consider the families to be homeschoolers, regardless of how purists define the word.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a couple of people who are using the GA K12 and like it. We looked into it and didn't find anything really negative to say about it. Our deciding factor was the testing requirements. We didn't want the girls taking the CRCT. If you're ok with state testing and the curriculum, then go for it. Luckily, here homeschool costs as much or as little as you want it to. If we had to do some of the cover school options that other states do, we would probably have had to take the free K12 route, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...