Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

My son is in public school first grade and a little advanced in his reading and math. The teacher has told us he is "the best reader in the class and maybe in the whole first grade." This week he told us that he was getting to go to a new, extra reading class outside of his regular classroom. He's since revealed that it's comprised of all first graders (including some kids I know to be particularly bright) from the four classrooms at our school, and that they are reading Magic Treehouse Dawn of the Dinosaurs. So, it's like an extra supplement.

 

Today I got a note from the school informing me that DS had been referred for "reading club", where the students would be working on "grade level fluency", and that this intervention is funded by Title I. Now, what's confusing me is that I thought that Title I was exclusively for disadvantaged and/or low-achieving students? So...what gives? Anyone familiar with Title I?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Title I is for low-income schools, and the schools can use it as they see fit. So it looks like they are sending the best readers off to work in their own group, leaving in the classroom a smaller class and a teacher who can spend more time with each of the less advanced readers. Win-win.

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Title I is for low-income schools, and the schools can use it as they see fit. So it looks like they are sending the best readers off to work in their own group, leaving in the classroom a smaller class and a teacher who can spend more time with each of the less advanced readers. Win-win.

 

That makes sense. My Googling still hasn't helped me to figure out how it's explicitly allowed under Title I, but I think I'm finding mostly information about "targeted assistance" programs rather than schoolwide programs. (Ah, here we go. "Schoolwide programs have great latitude in determining how to spend their Title I, Part A funds. Schoolwide programs do not have to identify particular children as eligible for services, show that Part A funds are paying for supplemental services that would otherwise not be provided, or separately track federal dollars. Instead, schoolwide programs can use their Title I, Part A funds in the manner they choose, as long as they engage in reform strategies that increase the amount and quality of learning time and help provide a high-quality curriculum for allchildren, according to a comprehensive plan to help children meet the State's challenging standards.")

 

DS claims this "extra class" hasn't replaced his regular reading groups, so I don't know what the rest of the class (still about 20 kids) is doing while they're pulled out...

Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes sense. My Googling still hasn't helped me to figure out how it's explicitly allowed under Title I, but I think I'm finding mostly information about "targeted assistance" programs rather than schoolwide programs. (Ah, here we go. "Schoolwide programs have great latitude in determining how to spend their Title I, Part A funds. Schoolwide programs do not have to identify particular children as eligible for services, show that Part A funds are paying for supplemental services that would otherwise not be provided, or separately track federal dollars. Instead, schoolwide programs can use their Title I, Part A funds in the manner they choose, as long as they engage in reform strategies that increase the amount and quality of learning time and help provide a high-quality curriculum for allchildren, according to a comprehensive plan to help children meet the State's challenging standards.")

 

DS claims this "extra class" hasn't replaced his regular reading groups, so I don't know what the rest of the class (still about 20 kids) is doing while they're pulled out...

Probably either the subject he likes the most or the subject he needs the most.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just learned about Title 1 schools and the extra funding these school receive to use for services. We have one in our local district where 50 percent of students are on the free lunch program. What is interesting is that it's the only school in our district where my friend's 2e son receives not only special services for his documented LDs, but also services for the areas in which he's gifted.

 

She's been extremely happy with the school's ability to offer both services to her son, compared to their experience in another more affluent school in the district that does not receive Title 1 funding.

 

It did make me pause and wonder why more parents wouldn't seek Title 1 schools for their dc as opposed to more affluent schools in the district. I guess one could argue that not all Title 1 schools use their funding the same way, but it seems like a better funded school would offer more in general (they have credentialed assistants in every classroom).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I taught in a school wide Title I school for a decade, and I wouldn't put my DD in one. They are well funded and have a lot of frills but they also have a lot of problems that come from poverty-the average kindergartner in that school was at least 2 year behind on verbal skills on school entry, for example, mobility was 65-70% over the course of a year! leading to a lot of doubling back and re-teaching, and it simply was not a good setting for an above grade level coming in kid (admittedly, the district as a whole does a lousy job with GT). I do, however, think it was likely a better setting for a struggling student than most suburban schools, because class sizes were a lot smaller and more supports we're provided (among other things, there was actually O-G based phonics instruction in ALL classes, not just special ed ones). I have a friend who is actually considering putting her DD in a title I school for that reason. Her DD does not qualify for special ed, but is definitely a struggling learner. She pulled her to HS this year, but since older brother (HSed for health reasons) is an accelerated learner as long as he doesn't need to write on paper (motor delays), it's still really hard for the younger girl. Her mom thinks that maybe, in a title I school, she'd get the support she needs and be in the middle of the group instead of always at the bottom, which would be good for the child's emotional well-being).

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

It did make me pause and wonder why more parents wouldn't seek Title 1 schools for their dc as opposed to more affluent schools in the district. I guess one could argue that not all Title 1 schools use their funding the same way, but it seems like a better funded school would offer more in general (they have credentialed assistants in every classroom).

 

Well, in our case, there isn't an elementary in our geographic area that doesn't qualify for Title I. Also, I'm thinking not all Title I schools are created equally. I'm neither seeing loads of sub-par students nor loads of benefits in the school. We have a lot of shiny new iPads, big classes (22-25 per class so far in kindergarten and first, no aides or assistants), little differentiated instruction except for ESL pull-outs and special ed pull-outs. And now, this mysterious "reading group" for the highest tier of first graders.

 

I'll be interested to see how this twice weekly group plays out...I wonder if it was just formed or if they just identified my son for it? He reported just about a week ago that he was getting so bored during reading groups that he made it fun by readingasfastashecouldwhenitwashisturn. Maybe it took his acting out to make the teacher act? >.<

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I do, however, think it was likely a better setting for a struggling student than most suburban schools, because class sizes were a lot smaller and more supports we're provided (among other things, there was actually O-G based phonics instruction in ALL classes, not just special ed ones).

 

I taught in a Title 1 school for 6 years.  Do you remember what the O-G based phonics instruction was?  I mean, did the teachers use a specific curriculum, resources?  Receive special training?  Our go-to for struggling readers was Reading Recovery, which was not successful for all children. 

 

I am very interested in this topic...you are the first person I've seen who's mentioned O-G based instruction in all classes at a public school, not just special ed.  I had never heard of O-G based instruction until I was teaching my oldest son how to spell (great reader, abysmal speller) and then I used LOE Essentials with him and his brother for spelling and have used LOE's Foundations with my daughter.

 

I would love to know more about how your school taught O-G based phonics in the classroom.  Thanks!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

My kids are in a Title I school. Both were pulled out in K and 1st for reading groups. With Common Core standards and no child left behind, the way our school is adapting is to have a one hour Reader's workshop, another half hour of guided reading/interventions, and a Daily Five. My kids were always pulled out during guided reading/interventions. It meant they brought home a lot of blank busy-work sheets because they were working with a reading specialist so that they wouldn't stagnate. As far as how they identify who gets to be in these groups, they use the Fountas and Pinnell reading assessment. Based on the kids' scores, they place them in an appropriate group.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

For the entire school to be designated Title 1, at least 40% of students must qualify for free or reduced lunch. 

 

That leaves a pretty wide range.  40% of students qualifying for free or reduced lunch can lead to a very different situation than 90% to 100% of students qualifying.

 

Or two schools could have the same percentage, but one is rural and the other urban - the urban and suburban schools tend to be more transient, which comes with its own set of problems.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...