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Hi, I was wondering if people could please suggest some remedial reading programs that they found successful.

 

 Ds 10 has Dyslexia

 

He can currently read books like Dr Seuss, Big ball of string,  Frog and Toad, etc fluently. He has done many phonics programs, including explode the code, Ordinary parents guide to reading ( never completed) Some Rod and staff workbooks and LEM workbooks (Australian).

 

 He is currently working through Spelling Matters and has just about completed the grade 2 workbook.

 

Thank you

 

 

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My two are Barton and Abecedarian.

 

I used Abecedarian (abcdrp.com) for harder one-syllable words, I think Level B is good for the things like ay, ow, ea, ai, oy, and the ones like that.

 

If he knows those but does not know multi-syllable words... I don't have suggestions.

 

If he may have memorized words but is not good at sounding out through a word (from beginning to end) then I think Barton would be really good.

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I also use Barton with my two (9 and 13) after a total fail with a private dyslexia tutor specialist and some standard reading programs.  This program is even teaching me things I never knew about the English language (and this was one of my best subjects in school).  

 

Although you can hire a tutor for this program, it can be more costly than the program itself in the long run.  Also, most tutors want a one hour session twice a week, but a lot of students wear out doing a full hour twice a week.  My kids did terrible with that schedule.  Once we shifted to 4-5 times a week, only 20-30 minutes a day, they were both much happier, far more willing to do the lessons, retained the information better and I actually felt better too.  The DVDs teach you how to tutor and if you are interested, you could end up tutoring other children as a part time job.  If not, Barton materials usually resell for close to original value.  Just be aware that you need to keep the letter tiles from Level to Level after Level 1 so the new owner would need to purchase their own.  The other option is to purchase the tile app for I-Pad (really helps speed up set up and clean up and the kids enjoy using the software), then just use that after you sell the Level.

 

There are many programs out there, depending on where the reading disconnect is.  Does he have difficulty with spelling too?  Has he been assessed?  There might be other issues that commonly crop up along with dyslexia that are harder for a parent to recognize.

 

I will say that Barton has really, really helped both of my kids (my daughter, especially, is finally reading more independently, and not just picture books, and she is also finally able to spell site words that she never could before).  You really have to follow the steps Barton lays out, though, even if sometimes they seem a little silly or repetitive or you aren't immediately seeing the purpose.  If you follow the system pretty much as scripted, from the beginning, while the levels are still pretty basic, then as the levels get harder the basic steps for getting through each lesson are already automatic and you and the student can flow through the lessons a lot more smoothly.  You also need to be patient with this program.  You can't just rush through each lesson and expect any retention.  Dyslexics need a lot of repetition and review (but hopefully not too boring).

 

There is a free tutor screening and a free student screening on her website.  They don't take very long, are pretty easy to administer and are not screening for academic achievement so there shouldn't be any test anxiety.  Her screening system actually caught a mild auditory processing issue that my younger one had when our evaluator had not even noticed it.  We were able to remediate that with LiPS and then start him on Barton and it worked great.

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Check out the "Homeschooling in the Burbs" blog since she talks about Barton and she goes into detail about how to use the system.  If you were interested in seeing it in a bit more detail, you should check out her blog.  She has a subheading for Barton on the left side of the screen.  This system doesn't work for everyone and one size does not fit all, but I know a lot of people for whom this was the only thing that really did.

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for 100 you can get the teachers manual for logic of english essentials as a pdf?  its more of a spelling program but it does some reading, too.  you can look at her free teacher training videos.  She's kinda on a mission to help teach reading better.

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Some more to consider would be Dancing Bears, Rewards Intermediate and High Noon.  Also ElizabethB (?) has some free lessons on her website.

 

With $<100 to spend- I would probably go with some version of Dancing Bears and the matching spelling program Apples and Pears.  They are English programs that (I believe) can be bought directly in Australia, avoiding the high shipping costs of an American program.

 

Also, even though you don't think you'll go with Barton, I would still have your son take the Barton screening.   It shows if the child is struggling with distinguishing sounds.  LIPS, that Ms. Barton recommends in that case, was quite helpful for my DD who failed it - & I think I could have done it from the manual alone which is under $100 (I had the extra dvd's that I had found used - but the manual comes with some dvds as well)

 

 

 

 

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IF he needs to go back to phonemic awarness (aka has trouble blending):

 

http://www.abcdrp.com/docs/ABCD_WABS_03.pdf

 

This is a free supplement for Abecedarian. If you use this, use nice multi sensory materials. Aka letter tiles that are nice and have a good feel. I really like the AAS tiles, which are magnetic, and slide on a magnetic dry erase board.

 

There is also a book Reading Reflex that is about $20 and good for phonemic awareness. It is also going to need some nice tiles.

 

Those are the low-cost options I know of. Technically they are lower level than where he is, but for many kids this is the skill holding them back. You would want to try to figure out if this is the skill holding them back... Imo a way to do this is give a "nonsense word" screening and see if he can blend and segment nonsense words. If that is a problem -- he needs this level, and these resources are not Barton, but they are cheap.

 

I also really like the Abecedarian error correction guides. There is a part 1 and part 2 on YouTube. It has been really helpful to me, and it is free, too.

 

Letter tiles made all the difference in the world for my son. That is just him -- but there are probably local letter tiles. Or, letter cards where you write letters on an index card. Or, have some little blocks that slide well, and write letters on them. Or poker chips or checkers, maybe. I could see writing a letter on a piece of paper and taping it across the top of a poker chip.

 

My son also does well with dry erase markers and writing syllable parts in different colors.

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(Reading Reflex is basically a book about how phonemic awareness is important and some ways to teach it. Many similar things might be on the Internet. It has you cut out worthless flimsy pieces of paper to substitute for letter tiles.)

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Thank you so much.

I will look into all those resources.

 I have done extensive phonics work with him. He can identify all the single and double phonograms in isolation but has trouble once they are in words. He also does not sound out words (apart from playing eat a treat). I can give him a list of words say knight, fight, flight, might, light and sight. get him to underline all the ight  in the words,tell him that ight sound, get him to repeat it, point out every single word has ight in it so will have the ight sound at the end of the word, and ask him to read the words and he will not be able to sound them out. I have even tried reading him the list of the words first, then going through the same process, and he will still not be able to read the words.

I have taught 2 other dyslexic children and both of them learned to read.

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Can he do this verbally?  Phoneme removal/addition/substitutions?  For example, can you tell him light and then ask him to add a f sound (to make flight) or replace the l sound with an m sound to make might?

 

You might want to look into vision therapy as well.

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http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/howtotutor.html

 

This is the link for Elizabeth B's page.

 

My son had a huge problem just in learning to sound out. We spent many weeks on it (I think about 2 months before he could sound out a word like sun, man, etc on his own -- just to figure out what word it was).

 

He did not have any reading skills at the time. I have given some of the things that helped. Letter tiles, word chains, Elkonin boxes, are similar to what is in Barton Level 1. I own Barton Level 1 and the videos show how to use the letter tiles. The blending and segmenting guide describes a similar thing.

 

I had him start with copying me. He could not do oral blending. We started with words like "am" and "up" that had just two letters.

 

For kids who have memorized these words they have them practice with made-up (nonsense) words so they can practice blending at a low level.

 

In general though, if you have your letter tiles you have them laid out, pull-down (slide down) a tile as you say that sound (aaaaaa), then pull-down the next letter and say "mmmmm." Then you can swoop your finger under the words and say "am." Or bump the two tiles together and say "am."

 

To segment, start with two tiles spelling "am." Say "am." Then pull-down the a and say "aaaa." Then pull down the m and say "mmmmm." Starting this way was easier for my son to see/hear what was happening. He could not hear that easily and would never know what he was supposed to do with oral blending/segmenting.

 

I had my son start very small, just copying me for little parts of this. He was not doing any of this indepedently for a while.

 

But, he never "just remembered" any thing what to do.

 

If kids "just remember" without really blending or segmenting, then that is where the nonsense words really come in. They are not likely to remember them.

 

Another thing is "the notched card technique." With this, you cut a corner out of an index card. You use it to uncover one phonogram in a word at a time. This can help the child to blend from left to right. This helped my son, too. I still go back to it sometimes. I go back to the Abecedarian error correction videos all the time, though.

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I just made up a concentration game using a list of ight words, with picture cards to go with them and you know what. He sounded them out and got them all. Why will he sound out for a game but never try sounding out as a strategy while reading? Perhaps I should cerate lots of different games using words and teach that way.

 

I am thinking that along with his Dyslexia he also has a bit of an attitude problem towards reading, and thinks that he cannot read so he doesn't try very hard.

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I am thinking that along with his Dyslexia he also has a bit of an attitude problem towards reading, and thinks that he cannot read so he doesn't try very hard.

At 10 he probably HAS developed something of a negative attitude towards reading...because it is really, really hard for him and nothing seems to really help that situation the way it should.  My kids got really depressed because they could not read any where near as efficiently as their peers.  Homeschooling has helped and remediation has helped but this has not been an easy journey.  I try to keep them aware of their successes, and give them lots of encouragement about their weaker areas.  What helped my kids was my reassurance, through facial expression, vocal tone and choice of words, that I get how hard this is, that it really is a struggle, and that I do believe they are bright and capable.

 

The evaluator we had who determined both kids are dyslexic gave me two analogies for me to understand just how much they are having to work at this.  

 

1.  It is like someone giving a person who only speaks and reads American English a map of Greece, written in Spanish and dumping them in Sweden then telling them to find their way to the capital of Greece.  If they are bright and resourceful, they will get there, but it won't be an easy journey and it may take a lot longer than someone with a map of Greece written in their native tongue who also knows Sweden.

 

2.  She also said it was like you are in a marathon race and everyone else starts running along the designated path.  When you start, though, something blocks your path and you have to take a detour.  Now there is another path to get to the finish line that is still sort of efficient but you don't know how to get to it so you wander all over trying to find the finish line.  When you finally get there, you have run 10 times further and in many cases faster, but no one appreciates your effort because you came in last, and now you are completely exhausted and have no energy for anything else.

 

 

Being bright but unable to function in a media that most people equate with intelligence and through which the bulk of our communication and recording of information come from is a very hard place to be.

 

By the way, I agree that you really should go ahead and do the tutor screening and student screening for free on the Barton site.  It might help point out areas of struggle that are tripping your son up that need to be remmediated.  It can' t hurt, it doesn't cost anything and it might help give you somewhere to focus on to help the situation.

 

I realize that Barton is expensive and is obviously not an option right now.  I do understand.  Hopefully some of the other suggestions are programs that are available locally and will help your son. I will keep my fingers crossed that one of the other suggestions works.

 

 I do want to clarify something for anyone else that finds this link and dismisses Barton out of hand because of the $3000 price tag you mentioned.  You don't pay $3000 in one year.  You only pay by the level.  In fact, while Level 1 and Level 2 go relatively quickly, it can still take months to complete both if you go slowly to increase retention and get to mastery level (which is usually the best option for a dyslexic child).  Level 3 has taken us months and months to do.  I know that some students have taken a year or more on Level 4 because it is so long and intense.  

 

Barton is not a system where you plow through all 10 levels in a year and call it good.  It is something you use for the long haul and you only pay for each level as you need it.  Up through the middle levels it actually is supposed to replace all other language arts curriculum, so you wouldn't be using any other language arts until after Level 4.  Level 9 and 10 are really in prep for High School level reading so some kids won't be ready for those until they are in middle school or even high school depending on the child.  In other words, you can start the lower levels, then just do review of those levels (plenty of support material in the TM and on-line) until you have additional funds or the student is maturationally ready for the next level so the cost is spaced out over quite a bit of time.

 

$3000 still sounds like a lot of money, I know, but after spending a fortune on private tutoring through a dyslexia specialist that actually did more harm than good and sadly did not help at all (and really put us in credit card debt for a bit), $3000 over 3-4 years or so doesn't seem so bad since I can pay for each level only as I need it or can afford it (my mom, bless her, is helping us with the cost).  Add to that the fact that it is a system I can then either use to tutor other kids as a part time job, or sell for nearly the original price seems like a pretty awesome bargain to me.  In the long run, it may only cost a couple of hundred, or even bring in money.

 

All that being said, I do wish initial cost was lower, I really, really do, especially for all the people out there that would like to use the system but can't afford it at all.  There are many who cannot afford the $250 - 300 per level and they might greatly benefit from this program.  It has been a lifesaver for us.

 

You might read The Dyslexic Advantage by Brock and Fernette Eide, The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan by Ben Foss, Overcoming Dyslexia by Sally Shaywitz (sp?), How to Homeschool Your Learning Abled Kid by Sandra Cook (ebook written by a woman who posts on this site and has two dyslexic sons who has had a lot of Orton-Gillingham training), Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner by Kathy Kuhl, etc.  I found useful pieces of info from all of those books.  Maybe you have a library you could get most of them?  The ebook by Sandra Cook is not as costly.  I think it is 5 or $6.

 

I hope with all my heart you find something that DOES work and is affordable.  Definitely do the Barton screening, though.  It really is easy and could get you some interesting and useful info one way or the other...Good luck!

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My son was crumpling up his little readers, kicking me, crying, trying to crawl under the table, etc. I don't have to wonder if he had a bad attitutude about reading or a negative association.

 

For me, he had to be successful. Even if he was copying me, that was a good job.

 

He stayed at single words for a long time. When he is struggling to sound out, sounding out one word is hard. When there are a lot of words (like in a sentence with 5 words, lol) then that was like -- time to shut down. So we did stay at decoding single words for a long time. A single word on a dry erase board, or a single word on a flashcard (although he prefers a dry erase board), a single word with tiles.

 

When we read I would ask him to read one word when we came to it in a sentence.

 

He had to spend months getting comfortable at the word level. He takes a very long time to internalize patterns, so he would have to keep sounding words out for a long time.

 

If that is where he is there is no point in trying to make him perform at a higher level.

 

If you start easier and in a different format, maybe he can start to think, when reading time is coming, "this will be easy."

 

I read a thing about what it is like to have to sound out every word as you read and trying to read things too hard. By the time you sound out a few words, you have forgotten what the words were to make sense of what you are reading. It is too much of a demand on working memory (for anyone). Then if that is the experience of reading with sounding out, it can make sense to start jumping around and guessing words.

 

Another thing that helped my son was that I would always have a way to start him off. This is because he would seem to forget how to get started. This started as covering up the end of the word with my finger, like with a notched card. He should say the first sound. If not, I would say the first sound. Usually that would be enough for him to get unstuck, and he would pick up and sound out the word as I uncovered it. (This came after he was copying me and came to do more and more on his own.)

 

He is over this now, but he spent two years just forgetting what sounds a letter would make. Like, brain freeze, nothing he could do. Then he could get anxious from the brain freeze. Not good. So I was always quick to give him a sound and help him move on.

 

I wonder if he knows his Dolch words well? If not, it is really hard to read sentences. If he is still messing up here/there/where and things like that, then independent reading is just extremely frustrating.

 

We did not do Dolch words for a while bc it confused my son that they don't follow the patterns. So that meant -- no asking him to read on his own. It also means, if he doesn't know them, and they are difficult to sound out, that he is filling them in from context as he reads.

 

It took my son a long time to learn the Dolch words.

 

It is really good that he could sound out the words for the game, though. There is just a leap somewhere that makes it too hard in some way, to do the list. If it is negativity, you address that in the same way as if it was reading itself. Be positive and give him lots of chances to succeed and few to feel frustrated. But he could have been legitimately overwhelmed by too many words in one place and frozen up on knowing how to get started. That was a real thing for my son, it just took a lot of practice for him to be like "bam I know what to do" and always remember all the sounds and his procedure of sounding out.

 

My son was a non-reader though, really, when we started this way, and he was younger. It might not make sense for your son. At the time I felt like it was so slow, I only stayed slow so he wouldn't shut down (which would involve hitting or kicking, scribbling on things, trying to grab a paper and crumple it or throw it on the ground). So it would be really clear that I didn't want to push him to the point where he did that. I wanted to keep him far from that point. But I think many kids don't act out like that, they just try and try even if it is a great strain. I know I would have pushed him too hard and kept it too frustrating and difficult if he hasn't had acting-out behaviors. But now I wish I had been more patient at times, and been faster to see when he was doing his best and making steady progress, even if it was slow progress.

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When he's reading Dr. Seuss etc., are these able to be read because they are memorized?   If you give him a Dr. Seuss he has never seem (if there is one), especially one that is not very word limited, can he read it?   (Something like The Places You'll Go or The Lorax, or If I Ran the Zoo with lots of made up animal names-- not a limited word one like Cat and the Hat.)  I ask because there is a discrepancy between what you say he can read in the first post and some of what you report as difficult.

 

Doing word families -ight words, for example, can cause some children (like my son who went to a Waldorf. Steiner school which used word families) to focus on the ends of the words rather than to work them out from the left side first, as English is read.  So I do not know how such a game would do in translating to the actual task of reading a book.

 

Power Tools for Literacy, Accelerated Phonics, Syllables and Morphemes, designed for ages 9-21 by Verena C. Rau did not in fact work for my son, but is in your price range ($49 US)  and is suited to your son's age.  Maybe a library near you would have it, so you can see it.   It is very accelerated in the early parts and by around the 5th chapter is on multisyllabic words.   If your ds can really pick up and fluently read things like the harder Dr. Seuss books it might fit, but if single syllable words are actually not totally automatic and fluent yet, I think it is likely that it will move way too fast and not give enough practice to achieve automaticity and fluency.  For my son it was also too rules based.

 

We used HighNoonBooks.com Reading Intervention program along with Sound Out Chapter books, which is also suited to your son's age, and is what for my son did work (with a lot of work at it--we did only reading and math pretty much for a while till he was able to read to learn).   And it worked extremely well after having tried a lot of other things unsuccessfully.  I think there are now multiple chapter books available on a single CD for under $100 (US) and each of two levels of the Intervention program is, I think, under $100 for all components--and you might not need both levels.   But that is still over $100, I think, though probably less than $300 and maybe less than $200.  (OTOH it is a lot less expensive than Barton).  It had many chances to practice and gain fluency starting from basic CVC words  and working up.   The High Noon program does not go up to as high a level as Barton with classic word roots, etc., but my ds had taken off on his ability to read at his interest and grade level before he competed the HighNoon program.  My son was 9 when he started and 10 when he ended the High Noon program, and now at 11.75 yrs can read adult level books.  He is 2E and had major decoding trouble, but not comprehension trouble.  

 

Helpfully it had sophisticated looking covers, and subject matter which often featured overcoming of challenges and teen protagonists who might do something like persevere through a difficult race, which was useful for the task of persevering through reading.  For my son it also had an enormous advantage of being practice based for automaticity and fluency, rather than based on memorizing rules which was a better fit to his particular dyslexic situation.  I think that is fundamentally why the program worked for him and why Barton probably would not have been as successful, quite aside from being more expensive.

 

If your son truly is fluent at a difficult Dr. Seuss level, he might place out of the HighNoon books level, but you could have him try their placement test (free online).

 

We pushed through the acting out times, with the emotional support of a doctor who said I should simply insist that he put in the effort for thus and so long thus many times per day.  As he started to "get it" and feel he could be successful as a reader, the acting out diminished and the willingness to work more and harder increased as well as the stamina to do so.

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I just made up a concentration game using a list of ight words, with picture cards to go with them and you know what. He sounded them out and got them all. Why will he sound out for a game but never try sounding out as a strategy while reading? Perhaps I should cerate lots of different games using words and teach that way.

 

I am thinking that along with his Dyslexia he also has a bit of an attitude problem towards reading, and thinks that he cannot read so he doesn't try very hard.

ElizabethB recommends using all capital to get them to sound out and to use nonsense words. I believe that she or DonPotter has an all capital letter Webster's Speller and other all capital resources to help.

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Hi, I was wondering if people could please suggest some remedial reading programs that they found successful.

 

HI,  We successfully remediated severe dyslexia and my sons are now in college on honor's based scholarships.  We used multiple programs in overcoming dyslexia.  Since people have frequently asked me what we did to overcome dyslexia, I documented what we used in our homeschool for the benefit of others.  You can see the protocol we followed at http://learningabledkids.com/reading/how_we_remediated_dyslexia.htm.  At the time we were remediating, Barton, All About Reading, and ABeCeDenarian were not popular or fully published.. The first couple of levels of Barton were available, but I didn't chose it due to cost and fear that we'd move faster than the levels would be published.  I've reviewed copies of AAR and like that it is quite a bit less expensive than Barton.  All of them are based upon Orton-Gillingham methodologies, so they are all likely to work if implemented according to the program design.   I had Orton-Gillingham training which helped me immensely in helping my guys and in my adjustments to the programs we were using. 

 

Hope that info helps!  :-D

 

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I have a 10 yr old boy with dyslexia and other learning challenges. He attends public school so he can get language therapy, OT, PT, and a reading specialist. I've also supplemented with private reading tutors after school and over the summer. We use Wilson Reading. He is making good progress - might be less than 1 yr behind. But I'm really responding to give you another idea beyond selecting the best reading program.

 

Books open a whole world of experiences. So while he is still learning to read, my son is using assistive technology in order to enjoy books independently at his proper intellectual level. He uses bookshare.org and read2go (iPad app). The result is a digitized audio book where he can follow the print while it reads to him. He is now a bookworm. He is on the fifth book in the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan and has developed a keen interest in Greek mythology. Also by following along with the digitized print, he is gaining reading fluency. He still practices reading with regular books too. But the digitized audio books were a game changer because they changed his whole relationship with books. Also it has improved his self esteem because he can confidently talk about books with his peers. Instead of feeling like a failure, he feels like an intellectual. Also he is exposed to vocabulary that would have been inaccessible at his reading level. The benefits multiply.

 

Good Luck, Lori

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I have a 10 yr old boy with dyslexia and other learning challenges. He attends public school so he can get language therapy, OT, PT, and a reading specialist. I've also supplemented with private reading tutors after school and over the summer. We use Wilson Reading. He is making good progress - might be less than 1 yr behind. But I'm really responding to give you another idea beyond selecting the best reading program.

 

Books open a whole world of experiences. So while he is still learning to read, my son is using assistive technology in order to enjoy books independently at his proper intellectual level. He uses bookshare.org and read2go (iPad app). The result is a digitized audio book where he can follow the print while it reads to him. He is now a bookworm. He is on the fifth book in the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan and has developed a keen interest in Greek mythology. Also by following along with the digitized print, he is gaining reading fluency. He still practices reading with regular books too. But the digitized audio books were a game changer because they changed his whole relationship with books. Also it has improved his self esteem because he can confidently talk about books with his peers. Instead of feeling like a failure, he feels like an intellectual. Also he is exposed to vocabulary that would have been inaccessible at his reading level. The benefits multiply.

 

Good Luck, Lori

Looking into assistive technologies for my own kids for the very same reasons....

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That is great!

 

If you are interested in Wilson, there is a yahoo group with a lot of information. I think Heart of Reading.

 

I did not consider it bc I didn't think *I* would be able to Implement it at home. There are no tutors locally.

 

I really only consider things I think I can figure out how to use.

 

There are online trainings for OG that I have looked at. I am Facebook friends with Dyslexia Training Institute that offers them, and I looked at Neuhaus.

 

I found out about them a little too late.

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