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What kind of pan do you use for making scrambled eggs?


Just Kate
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cast iron. I love, love, love my cast iron. I cook eggs on the skillet or sometimes in a small cast iron pot. if yours isn't black anymore, you need to season it. I season mine by leaving it on the stove, adding oil, and just letting the oil cook into the pan. I just "wash" mine with a metal scrubber (no soap), and then i let it dry with high heat on the stove.

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Depends on the texture I'm going for.

 

If the person I'm cooking for prefers a fluffier/creamier texture, I'll use an enameled cast--iron pan (like Le Crueset) using a lower (medium) heat

 

If I'm going for a firmer "French omlette" type texture I like a carbon steel pan at a higher temp.

 

Carbon steel also sold as Mineral pans (by De Buyer), and as black steel or blue steel pans. Crepe pans are made from this kind of steel, as are most traditional woks. They are like cast-iron in many respects (need seasoning, respond to heat similarly) but the finish is smoother and (IMO) that makes them better than cast-iron for some jobs (including eggs). Those who generally like cast-iron (but don't love using it with eggs, unless they have a pan that is old, well-seasoned, and smooth) would probably like carbon-steel pans a lot. They are under appreciated in home kitchens, but prized by professional chefs. Relatively inexpensive too.

 

Bill

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I use a well-seasoned cast iron.  I let it heat up, use a small amount of fat to coat it (spray oil or 1/2 tsp butter) and put in the eggs.  They slip out easily.  I use it to make over easy, omelets, scrambled, etc.  Clean up is easy - I just run water over it, use a very small amount of dish soap, rinse well and put it back on the hot burner to dry.  I'll wipe a small amount of fat in it while it is hot to have it ready for the next use. 

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I make scrambled eggs very slowly on the lowest possible heat in a deep, narrow pan (about 6" across) with a thick bottom.  Large curds form and then I bring them up from the bottom.  More curds form and the scrambled egg is done.  It's a slow dish, not a fast one.  Delicious.

 

L

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I use a well-seasoned cast iron.  I let it heat up, use a small amount of fat to coat it (spray oil or 1/2 tsp butter) and put in the eggs.  They slip out easily.  I use it to make over easy, omelets, scrambled, etc.  Clean up is easy - I just run water over it, use a very small amount of dish soap, rinse well and put it back on the hot burner to dry.  I'll wipe a small amount of fat in it while it is hot to have it ready for the next use. 

 

Okay...I must be doing something wrong. My small cast iron is very well seasoned - it belonged to my grandparents! When I make eggs, I melt a pat of butter over medium heat, put my scrambled eggs in the pan, cook them, and then have a mess to clean up afterwards! I'm probably not cleaning my cast iron correctly (with eggs, I usually boil water to get the stuck-on eggs cleaned out and then scrape with a metal scraper). Regardless, my eggs have never slipped out easily.

 

Maybe I need Cast Iron Cooking 101? :)

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Cast iron. Well seasoned. Already hot. No clean up save a quick rinse and wipe. This is totally nonstick for me. I think your pan isn't very well seasoned if clean up is a big hassle. Even if it is an old pan, you may need to reseason it. Also the pan should be hot. Butter should *sizzle* when it hits the pan, not just slowly melt. Like for pancakes. I usually get this result just on the hot side of medium. The eggs will cook very fast. Stiring is irrelevant. The eggs are done in few stirs/turns.

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Okay...I must be doing something wrong. My small cast iron is very well seasoned - it belonged to my grandparents! When I make eggs, I melt a pat of butter over medium heat, put my scrambled eggs in the pan, cook them, and then have a mess to clean up afterwards! I'm probably not cleaning my cast iron correctly (with eggs, I usually boil water to get the stuck-on eggs cleaned out and then scrape with a metal scraper). Regardless, my eggs have never slipped out easily.

 

Maybe I need Cast Iron Cooking 101? :)

 

I would probably start over on seasoning your pan.  Just because it is old doesn't mean it is well seasoned.  Here are some good instructions.  http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CastIronPans.htm

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