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Quill

Anyone here against dorm living for philosophical reasons?

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Crunchy is used to describe people sympathetic to environmental causes.  Think granola--i.e. "crunchy". 

 

Here in So Cal we have year round farmers' markets where organic produce is readily available, so I always thought of it as a "climate thing" but maybe it's really a "crunchy thing." Thanks for the vocabulary lesson, Jane!

 

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To the OP. If your daughter doesn't want to live in a dorm, she simply needs to stay away from schools that require freshmen to live on campus. While my daughter decided to live in a dorm, she ruled out a well-respected university, because she didn't like their freshman dorms. It is okay to be picky, there are a lot of colleges. I do remember there are some schools that allow students to have pets in the dorms. I am sure you can search for that if she was interested for any reason.

 

She now lives in an all-female dorm, and I have not heard any complaints so far. She has a restricted diet, so she does a good bit of cooking. She thinks she is the only one that uses the dorm kitchen. This is good, because she can put everything she needs in the full-size fridge. Finding time to cook is hard for her. She cooks a lot at one time, so she will have leftovers.

 

 

Been there, done that, and decided to encourage my son to consider stepping stones.

 

Good point--the bulletin board concept gives away my age!

 

The only stinking roommate I had as an undergrad was the woman who found our open room listing on the college bulletin board even though she was not a student at our college.  What a mistake!  I do wonder though how kids filter their social media connections when doing the kinds of things we have been discussing, i.e. finding roommates or travel partners.  Maybe my discomfort is misplaced since once upon a time I certainly relied on the college bulletin board which functioned as our community's Craig's List.

 

Thanks a lot for making me worry. Last week, she told me that she had found a ride home and back for Thanksgiving. I thought it was great news, since I didn't have to go get her. Then I read your post. (I do remember riding with someone I had never met to a location near my hometown my freshman Thanksgiving without giving it a second thought.)

 

This varies by country.  In England, most universities expect students to live in university accommodation in the first year, and I think some insist upon it.  In Scotland (where students traditionally went to university at 17) it was more common to go to your local university and live at home.

 

University accommodation can vary enormously.  My university had purpose-built halls of residence, but it had also bought up whole streets of individual houses, which they filled with small groups of differently-aged students.  

L

I went to Oxford for a summer semester, and they definitely had dorms. The dorm I stayed in was definitely built when life was different. My large room, with a fireplace, was meant for the student, and the tiny room next to me, with just enough room for a bed and built-in desk, was meant for the student's servant.

 

Food options at most colleges have improved.  My son's Midwestern college has a commitment to local food--their milk and apples are all local, for example.  But only organic may be tough.  I suspect your son's best bet would be to find a living community that focuses on organic foods or whole foods. Colleges in "crunchy" towns may have them.  (On that note, I just glanced at the dining info for UNC-Asheville.  Vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options in the dining hall. Milk is rBGH-free.  But no organic options listed.  Maybe because it is so hard to be 100% organic??)

 

On a different thread, someone mentioned that her daughter's university was modified the required food plan because of the girl's food sensitivities/allergies.  More colleges may see the need for food accommodations down the road.
 

That may have been me. We received a refund of the amount for the meal plan, because of my child's allergies. However, the university, a big state school, was also willing to work with her to find food that would work. She was to contact the food services when she got to campus, and the chef was going to tour her to all the campus eating locations to discuss what she could eat at each location.

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I am against dorms for all the reasons other people have stated.  I always lived off campus, and I didn't know anyone who liked the dorms unless it was for the parties and casual sex.  

 

I don't know if all colleges do this, but mine had a student room set aside for every major.  If you were a declared student in that major you could request a key to the room.  They had old desks (those large wooden ones), old couches donated by the professors, old donated textbooks, sometimes a fridge.  Between classes I always went there to study.  It was a great place to find like minded students and quiet.  It gave the on-campus benefit of a dorm (in the same building as the classes for your major) without the many downsides of dorm living.    

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My son is a commuter.  He didn't want the dorm life/college life thing that everybody talks about.  He is glad to be living at home.  Now if he was too far away then I would consider an apartment.  My niece and nephew (brother and sister) who are at two different colleges have an apartment they shared with another person that their parents approve of.  They love it and prefer this over dorm life/party life.  Not saying that dorm life = party life but in most cases that is the case. 

 

Holly

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My son is a commuter.  He didn't want the dorm life/college life thing that everybody talks about.  He is glad to be living at home.  Now if he was too far away then I would consider an apartment.  My niece and nephew (brother and sister) who are at two different colleges have an apartment they shared with another person that their parents approve of.  They love it and prefer this over dorm life/party life.  Not saying that dorm life = party life but in most cases that is the case. 

 

Holly

 

Mine will likely be commuters for this and other reasons.  The college we're looking at has a bus system that goes pretty far out from the campus, and there are many carpools.  The buses have wi-fi too.

 

Our piano teacher has one that commutes and one that lives in the dorms.  The one that lives in the dorms is always coming home to study and work on big projects because he can't concentrate in the dorms.

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I suppose this varies wildly from school to school. I went to a 4-yr, private university in the midwest, (UE) and there were differences from dorm to dorm, even. The dorm I lived in was generally quiet and people were well-behaved. Once I discovered there was such a thing as academic housing where noise levels were even more strictly regulated, I made it goal to live there. And true to my luck, they discontinued academic housing that year. (Sigh.) 

 

I toured some other schools and CSU (sorry, Colorado) stood out in my mind as absolutely insane. The dorm I visited on that particular day was PACKED with people, and made my hall look like a library study room. "Summer camp" was a great way to put it! 

 

I wasn't responsible for cooking or shopping as a college student, either. I'm not sure I could have handled that...I didn't even have a car on campus, and was 800 miles from home. Lunch and dinner was when I got to sit and be social with my friends. I was one of those weird students who actually DID study like crazy, and having to put together menus and find recipes and such on top of 18 hours of class plus work-study...yikes. In theory, I totally agree with you that it's *terrible* training for how to run a house. But that wasn't what college was for. 

 

While you got to swipe the card for meals, you knew darned well that was part of your tuition bill; there was no swiping of cards of any kind for things like books (HOW many hundreds was that?!?) or tickets for the on-campus plays, or even a trip to Target (which you had to mooch a ride for). 

 

I was SUPER ill-prepared to cook and clean, I freely admit that. 

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I lived in a dorm for the 3.5 years it took to earn my undergraduate degree. The first year I had a roommate; the remaining semesters, I had a single. It was bliss. As someone who was both ambitious and introverted, living in a single provided me with a place to recharge after taking charge all day long. *wry grin* Given my own experience, I haven't any problem with my daughters living in on-campus housing.

 

They do, however.

 

While they look forward to meeting new people, they haven't any interest in sharing a room or apartment with them. In fact, they have eliminated colleges from consideration when there is residency requirement but no guarantee of either a single or fulfullment of a roommate request (each other).

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Crunchy is used to describe people sympathetic to environmental causes.  Think granola--i.e. "crunchy". 

 

My list of crunchy cities would include places like Santa Cruz, Asheville, Amherst, Madison.  All of them have high quality post-secondary institutions.

 

Jane

 

 

Definitely UC Santa Cruz ... one of the most vegan-friendly universities.  In fact, when my sons visit my "adopted son," a student at UCSC, they insist on eating in dining halls that actually offer meat (Colleges 9/10 and College Eight, IIRC, have meat dishes in plain sight ... in others, it might literally be in a back room). Sample menu here. In other dining halls meat and non-vegan desserts can be hard to find. My sons are bemused by the warning signs for some food: "Contains Beef/Pork."

 

Me, I find the seasonal/local/organic food amazing. UCSC Dining Services even runs a 25-acre organic farm on campus. But it's not as appreciated by teenage boys :)

 

Anyway, Santa Cruz is definitely "crunchy" and proud of it.

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no guarantee of either a single or fulfullment of a roommate request (each other).

This is very sweet. Makes me wish my dds had graduated together!

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Whoa Santa Cruz would be a minefield for my soy-allergic dd18!

Wow, you're right! Only a few items at each meal *without* soy ...

 

Like I said, my teenage boys are underwhelmed ... :)

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