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Like Saxon Math, but Less Writing


shinyhappypeople
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If you are referring to the copying of problems from the text, then you might look at CLE (Christian Light Education).It is also an incremental spiral program, but students have workbooks (called Light Units). There are many threads discussing CLE math if you want to read reviews.

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Horizons.  That is one of the main three reasons I am putting my 9 year old back in Horizons.  (My son still uses Saxon.  It's a great program)

 

Horizons is colorful, interesting, and it does not require all that copying!  My dd's mind works lightening fast. Slowing down to copy the problems is of no value. Saxon moves a lot more slowly than Horizons though.  So be sure to look at the placement tests.  You could start your dd in Horizons 3, or 3 book 2, or of course Horizons 4 depending on her skill level.

 

Horizons 3b is a lot of review, but Horizons 4 looks like a very demanding, challenging year.

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Horizons is a lot of problems, too.  There are exactly two pages to each lesson.  THe manual is helpful, becuase it has some nice introductions and hands-on lessons to make math more fun.  You can just cross out some of the problems if it looks like too much.  THere will usually be four rows on each page, and each row is a certain type of problem.  So, if you feel your student doesn't need much of addition, for example, you can easily cross out half of those and still see and know that your student is getting the practice he or she needs.

 

Unlike Saxon, the problems are more clearly taught and reviewed in chunks, which makes it easier to tweak the program.

 

Still, the typeset for the 4th grade is VERY small.  My dd lvoes to write tiny, but if your child has normal writing (even as an adult I would have to concentrate to write as small as HOrizons 4 requires. I would say I have medium sized handwriting, so that is pretty significant.)  It can look a bit overwhelming but the program starts with about ten lessons of review, which could ease him into it.

 

Another option is to write out the Saxon problems for your child.  Or you can take a look at JUMP Math or Teaching Textbooks  They are both slow and gentle and with JUMP he can write in the book or with TT do many of them on the computer, or on scratch paper only when he needs to.

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Horizons is a lot of problems, too.  There are exactly two pages to each lesson.  THe manual is helpful, becuase it has some nice introductions and hands-on lessons to make math more fun.  You can just cross out some of the problems if it looks like too much.  THere will usually be four rows on each page, and each row is a certain type of problem.  So, if you feel your student doesn't need much of addition, for example, you can easily cross out half of those and still see and know that your student is getting the practice he or she needs.

 

Unlike Saxon, the problems are more clearly taught and reviewed in chunks, which makes it easier to tweak the program.

 

Still, the typeset for the 4th grade is VERY small.  My dd lvoes to write tiny, but if your child has normal writing (even as an adult I would have to concentrate to write as small as HOrizons 4 requires. I would say I have medium sized handwriting, so that is pretty significant.)  It can look a bit overwhelming but the program starts with about ten lessons of review, which could ease him into it.

 

Another option is to write out the Saxon problems for your child.  Or you can take a look at JUMP Math or Teaching Textbooks  They are both slow and gentle and with JUMP he can write in the book or with TT do many of them on the computer, or on scratch paper only when he needs to.

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There are ways to modify Saxon so that there is less writing.  First, you can copy the problems yourself.  I would copy five lessons at once on the weekend before.  It would take maybe five minutes.  You can also have your student do as much as possible orally.  That will usually cut out about a third of the writing load.

 

One thing I would *not* do is skip problems.

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What I like about Saxon: the explanations are clear, lots of examples, and its very thorough. What I don't like: the amount of writing required.

 

This is for a 9 yo (4th gr) and 8 yo (3rd gr).

For those grades, you can just buy the student written practice workbooks for Saxon Intermediate grade 3 and grade 4 to go along with what you already have. The content is almost identical, the pages are just perforated worksheets with the review set. Check Amazon.

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