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Swim Moms! (s/o of gym moms)

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I've tried several things to make the photo smaller if anyone has any ideas.  I will delete it in a day or two.  

CONGRATS that is so very cool.

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Can I mommy brag?  My girls are freshman, and swim for a 5A school.  Not only did both girls letter as freshman this year, but post-season honors came out today, and both girls made the All-District team!  All coaches in the district vote, so it isn't an in-school award.  I'm so proud of both of them!

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(photo deleted)

 

I've tried several things to make the photo smaller if anyone has any ideas.  I will delete it in a day or two.  

Aw you deleted it before I showed my son.  I so wanted to show him.

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Bumping this thread up...hopefully, it will keep going.  I know short course season is in full swing back in Virginia, and our LD and SC season here runs concurrently.

 

This past weekend was our first meet (the first one we attended).  There aren't as many events in ESFL as in USA Swimming (no 25's for 8 & U for example).  Our meets are smaller, too (a "big" swim meet will have about 150 swimmers...keep in mind, teams have to drive and fly at least 8 hours to attend most "away" meets -- exceptions in Germany and northern Italy, where there are teams "next door").

 

That said, I was playing official (training), which taught me a lot.

 

LegoManiac swam the 50 Free, 100 Breast and 200 Free on Saturday.  Sunday, he swam the "Pentathlon" (100 Free, 100 Fly, 200IM, 100 Back and 100 Breast).  He qualified for champs in the 50 Free (28.35 time), and took 2nd place.  100Breast, 3rd, 200 Free, 1st place.  On Sunday, 100Free 4th, 100 Back 4th, 100 Fly 3rd, 100 Breast 4th, 200IM 3rd) finishing 4th overall in the Pentathlon event.  He needs to shed about 10 seconds in all of the other events to have qualifying times, though.

 

PonyGirl swam the 200IM, 100 Free and 200 Free on Saturday.  Sunday, she swam the Pentathlon for her age group (50 Free, 50 Fly, 100IM, 50 Back and 50 Breast).  She qualified for champs in the 50 Free and 50 Fly.  She is sooo close in all of the other events!  My biggest "YAY" was dropping 6 seconds in the 50 Breast.  She has struggled with Breast for years (stroke issues that were just ignored and practiced).  We sent her to PEAK this summer, where they fixed her freestyle kick and her breaststroke).  Since PEAK in July, she has dropped 12 seconds from her 50 Breast -- and is only 6 seconds away from a qualifying time. The change is remarkable. PonyGirl is so excited about her improvement, she has started to believe that she CAN qualify in the 50 Breast, and that she can really do the stroke. 

 

The coaches here REALLY focus on proper technique.  If a swimmer is so tired they can't hold good form, they are told to slow down or rest -- lots of time is spent on doing things the RIGHT way vs. just keep swimming.  It really shows!  

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Thanks for posting, Lisa! It is interesting to see the differences in countries. Both of our coaches grew up swimming outside the US and I think it does change their perspective a little.

We have done two meets so far, one dual meet and one sprint meet. Times have been pretty good. We have a longer meet this weekend, both in travel time and number of events, so we will see how they do. Dd1 is training hard for Winter Juniors and is pretty much tired all the time.

 

The fall is flying by!

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Can I just beat my head against the wall for a moment.  My oldest who is a junior in high school and a couple of seconds away from scholarship money has informed me he is bored with swimming.  He just wants to swim for the high school and no longer do the club team.  He seems to be struggling with "fear of missing out" on fun things his non swimming friends are doing.  Scholarship money or not he knows he is not quitting unless he has another interest to replace it with. Replacing swim with girls and hanging out and doing nothing is not an option.  

I know part of it is a bit of burnout.  I have challenged him to think of what made swimming fun for him and lets think of ways to make it fun again.  Part of it is the coaching turnover.  This years coach is actually coaching and practice is harder. No more coasting if you want to improve. Part of it is "fear of missing out".  Trying not to make it about me and about his needs but really I just want to smack some sense into him.

 

My dd, otoh, has renewed passion for the sport and is loving the new coach.

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Can I just beat my head against the wall for a moment.  My oldest who is a junior in high school and a couple of seconds away from scholarship money has informed me he is bored with swimming.  He just wants to swim for the high school and no longer do the club team.  He seems to be struggling with "fear of missing out" on fun things his non swimming friends are doing.  Scholarship money or not he knows he is not quitting unless he has another interest to replace it with. Replacing swim with girls and hanging out and doing nothing is not an option.  

I know part of it is a bit of burnout.  I have challenged him to think of what made swimming fun for him and lets think of ways to make it fun again.  Part of it is the coaching turnover.  This years coach is actually coaching and practice is harder. No more coasting if you want to improve. Part of it is "fear of missing out".  Trying not to make it about me and about his needs but really I just want to smack some sense into him.

 

My dd, otoh, has renewed passion for the sport and is loving the new coach.

:laugh: My ds1 did exactly the same thing. He made Sectionals at 14 and everything was looking good and then after his freshman year he quit. He didn't even swim high school (played baseball at a small private school instead). We said, fine, you may quit. You must have a job. He got a lifeguard/swim teacher position. We said, you must have some physical outlet. He joined a club water polo team.

 

Then, he got a job as an assistant coach. Traveled with his club water polo team.  He was reminded through coaching how much fun swimming can be.

 

Now, as a freshman, he is swimming again. DIII. Struggling to get back in shape. But having a good time again. We are so pleased, but it had to be his own choice. 

 

Swimming is hard. Sometimes taking a break feels like the end of the world. But sometimes a break can be good.

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Can I just beat my head against the wall for a moment.  My oldest who is a junior in high school and a couple of seconds away from scholarship money has informed me he is bored with swimming.  He just wants to swim for the high school and no longer do the club team.  He seems to be struggling with "fear of missing out" on fun things his non swimming friends are doing.  Scholarship money or not he knows he is not quitting unless he has another interest to replace it with. Replacing swim with girls and hanging out and doing nothing is not an option.  

I know part of it is a bit of burnout.  I have challenged him to think of what made swimming fun for him and lets think of ways to make it fun again.  Part of it is the coaching turnover.  This years coach is actually coaching and practice is harder. No more coasting if you want to improve. Part of it is "fear of missing out".  Trying not to make it about me and about his needs but really I just want to smack some sense into him.

 

My dd, otoh, has renewed passion for the sport and is loving the new coach.

 

 

I have to agree with your ds. He IS going to be missing out on a lot. To swim on a USA team at the level a high school kid is (almost) required to swim is just a little crazy. The kid HAS to want to do it for themselves. Doing it because the parents are making them is bad every. single. time. (It is possible if he is on a small, unmotivated team that this is not the case. I don't really consider that to be USA swimming...We do have one team like that around here; most require a huge commitment from the high school kids.) 

 

When you say he has to replace swimming, what would work for you? He could get a job? Changing sports as a mid-year junior is not very likely to be possible. 

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Can I just beat my head against the wall for a moment.  My oldest who is a junior in high school and a couple of seconds away from scholarship money has informed me he is bored with swimming.  He just wants to swim for the high school and no longer do the club team.  He seems to be struggling with "fear of missing out" on fun things his non swimming friends are doing.  Scholarship money or not he knows he is not quitting unless he has another interest to replace it with. Replacing swim with girls and hanging out and doing nothing is not an option.  

I know part of it is a bit of burnout.  I have challenged him to think of what made swimming fun for him and lets think of ways to make it fun again.  Part of it is the coaching turnover.  This years coach is actually coaching and practice is harder. No more coasting if you want to improve. Part of it is "fear of missing out".  Trying not to make it about me and about his needs but really I just want to smack some sense into him.

 

My dd, otoh, has renewed passion for the sport and is loving the new coach.

 

Staying with swimming because a parent makes you is unlikely to have positive results. Swimming is a sport where internal desire is absolutely essential.

 

Trying new things. I have seen a few high schoolers switch from swimming to running with great success.

 

He says he wants to swim for the high school team. That will cut the hours and intensity, but he will still have some physical activity. How is that equal to "replacing swimming with girls." Are you saying he can't quit club swimming unless he has all his time booked with something that will completely physically drain him.

 

By cutting back to just the high school team your ds may have the opportunity to learn a skill that many high level swimmers don't learn--how to appropriately manage free time. How to make choices and prioritize a variety of activities. This is a skill. It is a skill that Micheal Phelps never developed as shown by his record of behavior after each Olympics. It is a skill my neighbor's dc did not have when part way through senior year it became clear a shoulder injury had ended his swimming career. That young man had a lot fun that spring that resulted in almost going to jail before going to college. High level swimmers don't usually get into trouble because they have no choices, but that means they don't learn how to manage "choice". Letting your ds cut back on swimming while still maintaining some physical activity, can give you a chance to help him learn how to deal with time management, priorities and and choices outside the constraints of swim, swim, swim, eat, study, sleep.

 

During that time of cutting back your ds might discover he misses the intensity. If he chooses to go back, it's his choice and his drive that pushes himself forward.

 

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^^^  What Betty said.  I do understand, because I'm right there w/ you w/ one of mine.  I'm not letting her quit the High School team, but I did agree to let her quit club after this year.. she wants to be on the team for a full 10 years,  and then quit,  but she is an assistant coach, and wants to just coach after this year.  High schoolers are under a lot of pressure, and Jr. year seems to be really hard.  I would let him quit the club, and maybe as Betty said, it might be that he changes his mind again in a year.  

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To answer some of the above questions :

The club team is not one of the uber competitive ones that demands practice 5-7 days a week. They ask for a minimum of 3 days per week. There is no practice on Fridays and Saturdays. So there is plenty of prime weekend real estate to participate in fun things.

 

He does not have to replace it with another sport. A job, volunteer work, a different club. He did track and field before swimming and has no desire to return to it.

 

The girls comment was unfair of me and probably related to my own baggage. Based off the responses I am going to say he can skip practice to go to some of the fun things at the high school with his non-swimming friends as long as he does at least 3 days a week.

 

I don't want him swimming because we are making him but I do think part of the fun suck is due to all that is going on right now with junior year stuff. Stuff that is temporary and just needs to be gotten through. As a 16 year old I don't know that he really grasps the temporariness of what is going on his life.

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By cutting back to just the high school team your ds may have the opportunity to learn a skill that many high level swimmers don't learn--how to appropriately manage free time. How to make choices and prioritize a variety of activities. This is a skill. It is a skill that Micheal Phelps never developed as shown by his record of behavior after each Olympics. It is a skill my neighbor's dc did not have when part way through senior year it became clear a shoulder injury had ended his swimming career. That young man had a lot fun that spring that resulted in almost going to jail before going to college. High level swimmers don't usually get into trouble because they have no choices, but that means they don't learn how to manage "choice". Letting your ds cut back on swimming while still maintaining some physical activity, can give you a chance to help him learn how to deal with time management, priorities and and choices outside the constraints of swim, swim, swim, eat, study, sleep.

 

I have to disagree with this.  I have no idea what Michael Phelps' problem is, but he's certainly not the norm.  Most swimmers do not go from "swim eat study eat study eat swim sleep" to rich, famous and unemployed.  

 

One doesn't learn time management by having plenty of free time.  

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I have to disagree with this.  I have no idea what Michael Phelps' problem is, but he's certainly not the norm.  Most swimmers do not go from "swim eat study eat study eat swim sleep" to rich, famous and unemployed.  

 

One doesn't learn time management by having plenty of free time.  

 

My point was at 19 he made the choice to party heavily and get caught after the Olympics. He did the same at 23 and 27. When his time was not heavily scheduled he displayed an inability to handle what to do with his time.

 

I can tell you I have seen this with swimmers who didn't go to the Olympics as well. As I noted specifically with my neighbor. High level swimmers tend to have their time completely scheduled. It's helpful and it's not because once you leave swimming, time management and setting priorities is a skill you need in life.

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Just wanted to give an update since I vented about this last week.

First I highly recommend the book Masterminds and Wingmen. Thanks to the insights in the book I was able to talk with my son and get some more info. Bottom line is he is not enjoying the new coach on the club team. He liked him just fine when he did the private sessions with him over the summer. He is having some difficulty with the group coaching dynamics.

Long talk (as long as you can talk to a 16 year old who knows everything) about different styles. Different techniques. And to please pay attention and make a mental note about specific things he does not like so we can come up with ideas and provide the tools he needs to enjoy the club team again. His biggest concern was that I would tell the coach. I told him he needs to be abLe to pinpoint what he doesn't enjoy and then he should talk to the coach if he feels it is necessary and I will be moral support.

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Can I just beat my head against the wall for a moment.  My oldest who is a junior in high school and a couple of seconds away from scholarship money has informed me he is bored with swimming.  He just wants to swim for the high school and no longer do the club team.  He seems to be struggling with "fear of missing out" on fun things his non swimming friends are doing.  Scholarship money or not he knows he is not quitting unless he has another interest to replace it with. Replacing swim with girls and hanging out and doing nothing is not an option.  

I know part of it is a bit of burnout.  I have challenged him to think of what made swimming fun for him and lets think of ways to make it fun again.  Part of it is the coaching turnover.  This years coach is actually coaching and practice is harder. No more coasting if you want to improve. Part of it is "fear of missing out".  Trying not to make it about me and about his needs but really I just want to smack some sense into him.

 

My dd, otoh, has renewed passion for the sport and is loving the new coach.

My oldest quit his junior year, just about killed me. 

I wished I'd gone to a sports psych for him.  

 

He is now swimming in college and loving it at the moment.  He did not get any money for swimming but did get academic money.

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Second meet this past Sunday.  Pony Girl Qualified for Champs in the 100IM and the 200Free.  She now has 4 events for Champs!  She also placed 1st in the 100IM, 200 Free, and 50 Fly, her free relay was also 1st. Her next goal is to qualify in both the 200 & 400IM in 3 weeks.  She's racking up those BB/A times ;)  LegoManiac swam his first 400 Free -- only 10 seconds away from Champ Qualification times (he finished 10 seconds faster than the next boy in his heat).  He did some re-swims in the 100 Back, 100 Free, and 50 Free.  He dropped 1/2 second in the 50 Free, He dropped 4 seconds in the 100 Back and 100 Free -- and is working extremely hard to reach his qualification times (we have some time...our last qualifying meet is in February in Lisbon).

 

I wrote my first DQ sliips and learned a few "what not to do" things (I used a wrong code, so a legitimate DQ was tossed, and the other I *thought* was a DQ, but was changed this year to be legal :p)

 

The rest of our meet schedule for November & December is like this:

 

November 8-9 (Home Meet -- Day 1 Short Course Standard Meet; Day 2 Short Course Long Distance)

November 15-16 (Away Meet -- Aviano & Vincenza -- same meet schedule as Nov. 8-9...this is also when we will be going to Venice and Florence)

November 29/30 (Away -- Long Distance Champs Livorgno)

December 8-9 (Stuttgart & Weisbaden Germany -- praying my husband isn't GONE, as this was our planned "Christmas" vacation)

 

After that, I know we have one more home meet, another one in Aviano & Vincenza in January -- District Champs in Lisbon in early February, and ESFL Championships (qualifiers only) at the end of February.  I'll be traveling alone with the kids to the 2nd Aviano/Vincenza meet and District Champs).

 

 

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DD's first meet is this weekend.  I'm looking forward to it and DD is starting to get really excited.  She's been working hard on her breaststroke kick for the last 6 months.  It's about 90% legal.  With a little luck she might not get disqualified this weekend.  :)

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Fun to hear of the young ones swimming.

My college boy has a meet on Friday.  it is against a school where his best friend is swimming.

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My daughter competed in her first open water ocean swim this weekend. I'm going to try to attach a photo later. All of the challenged athletes are paired up with 'swim buddies' for safety and to carry them up/down the steep steps. She wasn't disapponted when the older women she was told was going to accompany her didn't show up, and instead a very cute young guy did instead :). She said more then once he had trouble keeping up with her so she told him to grab her leg and she would pull him along hehe.

 

She crushed the swim and was one of the first out of the ocean. Her main concerns were of letting her bike relay partner down and to make sure to actually 'tag' him so that he could start his ride.

 

This coming weekend is the first paralympic meet of the season.

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My 7 year old just started swimming in sept and had her first meet.  She managed a c time on her backstroke and freestyle but dq'd her fly and breast.  Not bad for only 12 practices before the meet.  She can't wait for the next one.

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removed pic

 

I hope this works.  i will remove it after a couple of days.  here is my daughter and her 'swim buddy'.  Note the size difference and she said he had trouble keeping up with her  :lol:

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We're in a swim downtime right now. Our gymnastics team was axed at the high school, so we are going to extend swim season. We can stay seasonal swimmers even if we go two more months. So, in another week, here we go again! High school for the girls starts at Thanksgiving, so we'll switch to that then. Ds's high school team starts in February, with State in May. We need to get him precription goggles this year.

 

Navy girl was approached by a squadron mate to teach her to swim! Dd is waiting for a decision by her commanding officer if she can teach an class during regular PT time. Dd used to teach Master's, so she's very excited!

 

Gotta love those Master's coaches!  When the kids were all doing club swimming, I decided to join Master's even though the side stroke was one of my lap swim strokes. It was a fantastic experience.

 

In one of those weird twists of fate, we were recently referred to one of my former Master's coaches for reworking Sailor Dude's technique - probably after shoulder surgery. :tongue_smilie:

 

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My daughter competed in her first open water ocean swim this weekend. I'm going to try to attach a photo later. All of the challenged athletes are paired up with 'swim buddies' for safety and to carry them up/down the steep steps. She wasn't disapponted when the older women she was told was going to accompany her didn't show up, and instead a very cute young guy did instead :). She said more then once he had trouble keeping up with her so she told him to grab her leg and she would pull him along hehe.

 

She crushed the swim and was one of the first out of the ocean. Her main concerns were of letting her bike relay partner down and to make sure to actually 'tag' him so that he could start his ride.

 

This coming weekend is the first paralympic meet of the season.

 

This totally rocks! Congratulations to your dd and the picture is terrific.

 

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CAF_2014_buddy2.jpg

 

I hope this works.  i will remove it after a couple of days.  here is my daughter and her 'swim buddy'.  Note the size difference and she said he had trouble keeping up with her  :lol:

great picture

 

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One more update from me. When dropping my kids off at practice last night I reminded my son to talk to the coach about what we discussed. He breezily told me "not necessary. All good now."

This, of course, raised my suspicions but I let it go. He is the one swimming, not me.

As I was waiting with a friend the coach stopped in to make sure we had received email with some info. I could not resist opportunity to ask some questions.

Bottom line, what he was seeing in my son was the desire to sprint-which is good as he is a good sprinter-but he was resisting doing the technique and endurance training as it was boring. He did say it was normal 16 year old behavior. He is figuring out how badly he wants it or does he even want it.

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Hi Swim Moms!

 

Attended a home meet with my 9 year old this weekend. This is our second season competing. I still know nothing! :lol: I feel like a fish out of water. ;)

 

I've been a speech and debate mom for 7 years and know all the ins and outs of that culture but am still totally lost as far as swim culture goes! 

 

He's still in the lowest practice group. I think they have to be 10 to move up with our team. We're with a USA team. 

 

I have no idea what A/B times, etc even mean. :lol: 

 

He did drop a few seconds on his 50 free this weekend. He aged up to the 12 and under group this meet so had to swim all 50s and did the 100 Free which he hated. Poor guy, he's so used to 25s that he hopped out of the pool after the first length on his 50 Fly today. He was pretty upset but I think I convinced him that all swimmers make mistakes at some point and that it was not that big of a deal.

 

What can I be looking at to become an educated swim mom? Any website recommendations?

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I have no idea what A/B times, etc even mean. :lol:

 

He did drop a few seconds on his 50 free this weekend. He aged up to the 12 and under group this meet so had to swim all 50s and did the 100 Free which he hated. Poor guy, he's so used to 25s that he hopped out of the pool after the first length on his 50 Fly today. He was pretty upset but I think I convinced him that all swimmers make mistakes at some point and that it was not that big of a deal.

 

What can I be looking at to become an educated swim mom? Any website recommendations?

 

Ooohhh...I found a couple of great swim parent blogs including this one . I think I understand time standards a little bit now. I will have to check my heat sheet from this meet but I think my little guy got his first B time. :) 

 

I would still love any other resources!

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Ooohhh...I found a couple of great swim parent blogs including this one . I think I understand time standards a little bit now. I will have to check my heat sheet from this meet but I think my little guy got his first B time. :)

 

I would still love any other resources!

Get the Deck Pass app. (USA Swimming). A few weeks after each USA meet your DS times will be uploaded and you can then track his times, see how he improves and it will tell you if each time qualifies as a B/BB/A time, etc. Also many meets use the Meet Mobile app so instead of waiting and tracking down the papers they post up on the wall, you can just follow the meet on your device and get your DS times much faster. Both apps are free.

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If you're not into apps, this will show you his best times (from USA Swimming sanctioned meets):

 

http://www.usaswimming.org/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabId=1464

 

 

and here are the time standards:

 

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/d5488067-09a8-4b0e-8dc6-6dd4d72e251b/2016MotivationalTimes-Top16SingleYear(Revised11-15-2013).pdf

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It's fun to see your child improve, and have fun! My kids swam at their first championship meet last week. Ponygirl got 3rd in the 1500, 4th in the 800, and 5th in the 400 IM. So far she has qualified in every event at the March championship meet, except breaststroke. But her progress in breaststroke is what I am most proud of... After years of struggling through DQs, having multiple coaches tell her to swim it totally different ways, and dropping 2 seconds in a year, she has dropped 12 seconds from her 50 Breast time since August, and is 2 seconds away from a qualifying BB time. Old e s t son has fallen in love with the sport again, and is seeing qualifying times for the first time, after aging up in September. The two have a friendly competition as to who will get an A time first.

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Hi Swim Moms!

 

Attended a home meet with my 9 year old this weekend. This is our second season competing. I still know nothing! :lol: I feel like a fish out of water. ;)

 

I've been a speech and debate mom for 7 years and know all the ins and outs of that culture but am still totally lost as far as swim culture goes! 

 

He's still in the lowest practice group. I think they have to be 10 to move up with our team. We're with a USA team. 

 

I have no idea what A/B times, etc even mean. :lol:

 

He did drop a few seconds on his 50 free this weekend. He aged up to the 12 and under group this meet so had to swim all 50s and did the 100 Free which he hated. Poor guy, he's so used to 25s that he hopped out of the pool after the first length on his 50 Fly today. He was pretty upset but I think I convinced him that all swimmers make mistakes at some point and that it was not that big of a deal.

 

What can I be looking at to become an educated swim mom? Any website recommendations?

 

A lot of teams do not use A/B, AA, etc. times for anything.  Parents may look them up, but the coaches are oblivious.  They may be focused, instead, on qualifying times for your state meet (age group, then senior state); sectionals (also AG and senior versions); and then junior nationals.  Your first goals are probably going to be qualifying times for your state meet.  When you look those up, be sure you're looking at the right measurements; there will be "SCY," which is short course yards--times swum in a 25 yard pool; sometimes SCM, times swum in a 25 meter pool (these are not very common around here); and LCM, times swum in a 50 meter pool.  Most teams swim short course during the school year and long course during the summer, and there are state meets for both.  My 14 yo and can still swim age group (it goes through 14 here) and has senior cuts, so she can end up swimming four "state" meets a year:  AG SC and LC, and Senior SC and LC.  She doesn't focus on all of those, and after this spring, she will be 15 and swim senior meets only.  But the point here is that "senior" state doesn't have a minimum age.  Our senior SC meet was this last weekend, and plenty of the swimmers were 13 and 14.  

 

I hope your son doesn't get discouraged at being an older beginner.  He's not, but he may feel like it, as some of the 12 year olds will have been swimming for years.  A 12 yo boy, especially, has plenty of time, and he will drop big, fat chunks of time over the next year as his conditioning and technique improve.  As for hopping out of the pool, he probably needs to not hop out until the next heat starts anyway.  At least here, most meets use what are called "flyover" starts, meaning the finishing heat stays in the water, tucked up next to the wall, until the next heat starts over them.  So remind him to hang out at the wall until everyone else gets out--problem solved.  

 

Best of luck, and welcome to the club!

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Get the Deck Pass app. (USA Swimming). A few weeks after each USA meet your DS times will be uploaded and you can then track his times, see how he improves and it will tell you if each time qualifies as a B/BB/A time, etc. Also many meets use the Meet Mobile app so instead of waiting and tracking down the papers they post up on the wall, you can just follow the meet on your device and get your DS times much faster. Both apps are free.

 

 

If you're not into apps, this will show you his best times (from USA Swimming sanctioned meets):

 

http://www.usaswimming.org/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabId=1464

 

 

and here are the time standards:

 

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/d5488067-09a8-4b0e-8dc6-6dd4d72e251b/2016MotivationalTimes-Top16SingleYear(Revised11-15-2013).pdf

 

Thank you both! I will get both apps.

 

It's fun to see your child improve, and have fun! My kids swam at their first championship meet last week. Ponygirl got 3rd in the 1500, 4th in the 800, and 5th in the 400 IM. So far she has qualified in every event at the March championship meet, except breaststroke. But her progress in breaststroke is what I am most proud of... After years of struggling through DQs, having multiple coaches tell her to swim it totally different ways, and dropping 2 seconds in a year, she has dropped 12 seconds from her 50 Breast time since August, and is 2 seconds away from a qualifying BB time. Old e s t son has fallen in love with the sport again, and is seeing qualifying times for the first time, after aging up in September. The two have a friendly competition as to who will get an A time first.

 

Congratulations! Breast stroke is my little guy's best stroke at the moment. :)

 

A lot of teams do not use A/B, AA, etc. times for anything.  Parents may look them up, but the coaches are oblivious.  They may be focused, instead, on qualifying times for your state meet (age group, then senior state); sectionals (also AG and senior versions); and then junior nationals.  Your first goals are probably going to be qualifying times for your state meet.  When you look those up, be sure you're looking at the right measurements; there will be "SCY," which is short course yards--times swum in a 25 yard pool; sometimes SCM, times swum in a 25 meter pool (these are not very common around here); and LCM, times swum in a 50 meter pool.  Most teams swim short course during the school year and long course during the summer, and there are state meets for both.  My 14 yo and can still swim age group (it goes through 14 here) and has senior cuts, so she can end up swimming four "state" meets a year:  AG SC and LC, and Senior SC and LC.  She doesn't focus on all of those, and after this spring, she will be 15 and swim senior meets only.  But the point here is that "senior" state doesn't have a minimum age.  Our senior SC meet was this last weekend, and plenty of the swimmers were 13 and 14.  

 

I hope your son doesn't get discouraged at being an older beginner.  He's not, but he may feel like it, as some of the 12 year olds will have been swimming for years.  A 12 yo boy, especially, has plenty of time, and he will drop big, fat chunks of time over the next year as his conditioning and technique improve.  As for hopping out of the pool, he probably needs to not hop out until the next heat starts anyway.  At least here, most meets use what are called "flyover" starts, meaning the finishing heat stays in the water, tucked up next to the wall, until the next heat starts over them.  So remind him to hang out at the wall until everyone else gets out--problem solved.  

 

Best of luck, and welcome to the club!

 

Thanks for the welcome! :) He's only 9 and started meets when he was 8. He seems to swim times similar to the kids in his heats that are similar in age. 

 

Thanks for the help on the explanation of times! Still learning all of the shorthand.

 

I think I'm going to get him a swim backpack for Christmas. Any recommendations?

 

Also, he usually swims 4 days per week-sometimes 3 depending on our schedule. I was thinking of having him do some conditioning type stuff on his off days to build some endurance. I want it to be fun stuff he and I can do together. Any ideas on that? He plays rec soccer in the fall and spring so that helps at those times. I'm just thinking 20 minutes at a time of activities that can help with fitness level while building the strength and endurance necessary for swimming.

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Thank you both! I will get both apps.

 

 

Congratulations! Breast stroke is my little guy's best stroke at the moment. :)

 

 

Thanks for the welcome! :) He's only 9 and started meets when he was 8. He seems to swim times similar to the kids in his heats that are similar in age.

 

Thanks for the help on the explanation of times! Still learning all of the shorthand.

 

I think I'm going to get him a swim backpack for Christmas. Any recommendations?

 

Also, he usually swims 4 days per week-sometimes 3 depending on our schedule. I was thinking of having him do some conditioning type stuff on his off days to build some endurance. I want it to be fun stuff he and I can do together. Any ideas on that? He plays rec soccer in the fall and spring so that helps at those times. I'm just thinking 20 minutes at a time of activities that can help with fitness level while building the strength and endurance necessary for swimming.

Does his team do dry land conditioning?

 

My 7yo is swimming competitively. We have the option of dropping him 15min early for dry land. He likes those exercises, but his practices are so long (90min minimum) that he sometimes feels like he's missing time with friends in the neighborhood so he often skips. I'm fine with that because he is only seven. (He also has practice options five days a week. We aim for three practices.). Don't underestimate play! My son bikes, does monkey bars, pull ups, etc. All of that is fun and still good for his muscles.

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Does his team do dry land conditioning?

 

My 7yo is swimming competitively. We have the option of dropping him 15min early for dry land. He likes those exercises, but his practices are so long (90min minimum) that he sometimes feels like he's missing time with friends in the neighborhood so he often skips. I'm fine with that because he is only seven. (He also has practice options five days a week. We aim for three practices.). Don't underestimate play! My son bikes, does monkey bars, pull ups, etc. All of that is fun and still good for his muscles.

 

Dry land starts in the next practice group. His group just swims for 45 min.

 

Play stuff is what I hope to incorporate. I just want a little bit of "directed" play that will serve some conditioning purposes. Nothing wild. Just a little bit of targeting specific skills that will help with swimming. :)

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Dry land starts in the next practice group. His group just swims for 45 min.

 

Play stuff is what I hope to incorporate. I just want a little bit of "directed" play that will serve some conditioning purposes. Nothing wild. Just a little bit of targeting specific skills that will help with swimming. :)

 

Honestly, soccer is a great compliment to swimming. Hiking and just running around are good too. What you want to be careful about is not targeting sports that involve shoulders. Volleyball and tennis tend to be high shoulder usage sports. While it is okay to do all of them, it can overstress those areas. (This can be a little difficult because swimmers tend to be pretty good at them.) Cross country is another sport that is a good sport to pair up with swimming. Mostly, just let him play and have fun. 

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Honestly, soccer is a great compliment to swimming. Hiking and just running around are good too. What you want to be careful about is not targeting sports that involve shoulders. Volleyball and tennis tend to be high shoulder usage sports. While it is okay to do all of them, it can overstress those areas. (This can be a little difficult because swimmers tend to be pretty good at them.) Cross country is another sport that is a good sport to pair up with swimming. Mostly, just let him play and have fun. 

 

Yes, watch the shoulders.  We are already having shoulder issues at 10.  Part of the problem is that my daughter overuses her shoulders because she also used a hand cycle for several years (still does occasionally) and uses crutches part time but shoulders are a concern with big swimmers.  Especially for our kids that love butterfly!  

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SO MUCH FUN to read the swim stuff.  I miss those days of age group swimming.  My son was on the smoking relay as a 7-8 yo they were unbeatable.  

Thanks for sharing it all.  Enjoy it moms!!! they grow up so fast.  
my baby is now in college swimming.  It is tough work, he has to stay at school late , won't get home till Dec 21st and leave again on the 29th.   He has had a pretty good season as a freshman.  

Cheer for the other swimmers, be happy for the other guys great times, rejoice with those who rejoice and weep with those who weep.

 

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Competitive swim moms:  for those of you with kids who have competed in very large, highly competitive meets;  can you give me some ideas of what your kids did to prepare?  dryland?  running?  can someone explain tapering to me?  :)  Time line for all this in relation to the meet is very much appreciated.  

 

My daughter has a very large meet (para) in Canada mid March.  she swims with one team most of the time and they really don't have anything to do with this meet, not really doing near as much as they said they would to get her prepared, etc.    She has a para coach but only sees him about 2x a month and he has kids all over the state so of course can only help her so much.  

 

In a nutshell, I'm trying to help her with her dryland myself at this point.  not much I can do about the tapering, but I would like to understand it better (I do know the general concept).

 

Thanks!

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Subbing to the thread. My kids swim. Swim team here starts in fourth grade.

 

I don't know if I have the stamina to do something as obsessive as be a sports mom. I mean what about music, etc?

 

I was a dilettante. I would like my kids to develop more than I did, but I am not sure I'm willing to let them sacrifice music for sport, or sport for music... not to mention math.

 

Thoughts? How does being "a swim mom" affect your ability to be a music mom, a math club mom... etc.?

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If she's:

 

  a)  Under 12, or

  b)  Swimming less than 5000 yds a day or

 

I wouldn't taper - just be well rested.  

 

If she's over that, tapering is a finely tuned art form, but essentially, they gradually transition from long hard sets with little rest to all-out sprints with more rest.  Yardage will decrease, but can't go below what she swims in a day at a meet (ie.  1000 warm up, a 400 IM, 500 warm down, 200 Back, 500 warm down, 200 Breast 500 warm down, 100 Free, 500 warm down adds up to 3900 yds, so her taper can't go below that or she will be overtired for the following days of the meet).  Some people don't respond well to a taper, others do great.  There is some trial and error there.  How they taper depends so much on what they were doing for the rest of the season.

 

Doesn't her team have a championship meet sometime around then anyway?

 

Dryland is also dependent on age.  Under 12 (or full grown, whichever comes later) is generally body weight only (planks, lunges, etc)  I would talk to the para coach or a PT about this, as she likely under-uses and overuses different muscles

 

Most of all, I recommend looking for a team that will work with you on this.  Coaching over the Internet leaves a lot to be desired.

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Thanks Great White North.  I mainly just wanted to understand taper better and you have explained that.   I think her age group championship is mid February, maybe?  I don't pay too much attention to it since although she could attend, para meets are our main focus with US swimming meets her 'warm up'.  

 

She already has an overuse issue with butterfly so that has been cut back  She is 11.  So yes, young.  But they can move faster in the para world and she has tremendous drive.  

 

Looking for a team is a huge issue.  I have talked to a fellow WTM mom about that.  We are in the middle of no where with one medium size team.  To branch out will involve about 4 hours round trip.  We do that twice a month for the para team.  I'd love to win the lottery to have an apartment in the 'big city' so we could live there during the week so she could have options.  Guess I have to play the lottery first  :)

 

 

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Do you mean shoulder pain?  If so, take her to a PT, yesterday.  Cutting back will not solve the problem. 

 

Don't worry, I took her immediately to her general sports ortho (versus her leg specialist) who x-rayed and examined her closely.  He is on top of the issue.  In addition to swimming she has used a hand cycle a good bit in the past, not to mention her forearm crutches.  Her shoulders have been used more then the average kid.  

 

Maybe I should have said her shoulders are overused so we cut back on butterfly?  

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Competitive swim moms:  for those of you with kids who have competed in very large, highly competitive meets;  can you give me some ideas of what your kids did to prepare?  dryland?  running?  can someone explain tapering to me?   :)  Time line for all this in relation to the meet is very much appreciated.  

 

My daughter has a very large meet (para) in Canada mid March.  she swims with one team most of the time and they really don't have anything to do with this meet, not really doing near as much as they said they would to get her prepared, etc.    She has a para coach but only sees him about 2x a month and he has kids all over the state so of course can only help her so much.  

 

In a nutshell, I'm trying to help her with her dryland myself at this point.  not much I can do about the tapering, but I would like to understand it better (I do know the general concept).

 

Thanks!

I'm sorry I missed this been busy with life beyond hsing AS scary as it is.

 

I have a hard time saying what my son did, his coaches are the ones that prepared him. If your child's coaches aren't--- and I would talk to them about it and ask what they are going to do for her to prepare.  Approach it from the end that you do feel they know what is best but you just want to know what it means and entails. 

 

Since she has the para coach too ask him what she should be doing.    

 

and beyond that I would read up on tapering-- I know that my son felt better at his college big meet here and that he felt the taper was just right for him.  So it becomes a bit of an individual thing depending on the events they swim, the distances, and the sex boys and girls are a bit different.  

 

And then check out USA swimming.org and see what they say about how to do it.

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Subbing to the thread. My kids swim. Swim team here starts in fourth grade.

 

I don't know if I have the stamina to do something as obsessive as be a sports mom. I mean what about music, etc?

 

I was a dilettante. I would like my kids to develop more than I did, but I am not sure I'm willing to let them sacrifice music for sport, or sport for music... not to mention math.

 

Thoughts? How does being "a swim mom" affect your ability to be a music mom, a math club mom... etc.?

we never sacrificed school for swimming but my youngest did not do much in the other activities,  partially it was his personality and then also he was busy with swimming.  But I do know other children that were very involved in many other things and did swimming. It is a balance.

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And we went to watch our freshman son compete in his college Conference championship.  The team is only 4 years old.
 THEY WON!!!!!

It was a very exciting time.   He did some best times so that was also good and he scored points for the team.  They are also second in the nation, and the number one team has a Dive team so they probably can't make it to number one.  he isn't going to the NCAA championship but the team is hoping to win there too.  We shall see. 

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