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I have another question for the group.  My second child (boy - 3 years and 3 months old) is at the point where I feel I need to start some sort of formal learning/ work.  Until now we have been reading to him everyday; playing with duplos, cars, trains; used leapfrog dvds, and take him outdoors - park, pool, etc whenever we can. I would like to get ideas on what/ where would be a good place to start for math,reading and writing.  


 


I have looked at HWT and like it.  I have used AAS with my older daughter (7 years old) and thought I could use their AAR program with my 3 year old. Confused about my options with math.  We did not use any formal math curriculum for our daughter when she was young and now we use Miquon and Singapore during summer and winter breaks (to supplement school) so would like to know if these programs are good for the preschool years as well.


 


Any other thoughts/ directions/ advice/ critiques would help - thanks!


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I absolutely love the Rod and Staff preschool series. They are great for 3 & 4 year olds. I wouldn't do anything else with him (other than read, and the things you mentioned).

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Seconding the Rod and Staff workbooks! My new 4 year old is just finishing up the About Three series (for 3-4 year olds), and he'll be starting the ABC series* (for 4-5 year olds) when they come in the mail later this week! http://www.milestonebooks.com/

 

I also started doing Math Mammoth's kindergarten games like domino matching when he was about 3.5. http://www.mathmammoth.com/complete/kindergarten.php

 

*minus the B(ible) and the C(ounting). We're doing our own Bible reading and he's been doing Singapore Math Essentials K.

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I like the Kumon First Steps workbooks and then the later Kumon workbooks.

 

But, really, it depends on the kids. I had some young preschoolers who loved workbooks. My current little one is 33 months, so on the young side, but he is so much better about playing by himself while I do school with the other kids if he has some "school work" to do too. He enjoys play based and games based learning, he doesn't sit still for long and isn't into workbooks yet (or maybe ever...)

 

HWT preK is great, it does have a lot of hands-on learning and my kids liked the cd too.

 

WIth my current little, we use some printables from the 1+1+1 site and cover them with dry erase covers and he uses his dry erase crayons or markers with them. I'll sit with him and give him directions like "Find the letter A and color it." He loves feeling like he's doing school work with me. If I start the day with something like this with him, then he's content to go play when I need to work with the other kids.

 

We've just been doing a letter of the week theme. So he has printables with the letter of the week from 1+1+1=1 and Confessions of a Homeschooler, and for example, this week was letter B and I put out all our bear themed picture books to read together, we played an Eric Carle board game- Panda Bear, Brown Bear, and some of his printables are bear themed and involve counting and other skills besides the letter of the week. He knows all of his letters, shapes, and colors already, but the repetition won't hurt and he's little yet.

 

I like the MFW preschool activities, because they involve early reading and math skills but are play based. I also like the Lauri toys that come with the preschool program.

 

Little Hands books are great for fun hands-on activities. There's an early reading and an early math one.

 

We also just do lots of different things to keep strengthening his fine motor skills. Lacing, transferring with tongs, coloring (I like the Melissa and Doug crayons), Do a Dot markers, cutting with toddler scissors, sorting small things, etc.

 

I really love RightStart for little ones and Miquon, but I will personally wait until closer to 4 or 5 years old to start any of those. In the meantime, I'm going to play with cuisneaire rods with him (Education Unboxed is so great for learning how to play with those with littles), and do math games together.

 

 

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DS liked Kumon books to practice cutting with scissors and, a little later, doing mazes. We did some rhyming games, and he taught himself the capital letter names and sounds with the LeapFrog fridge phonics toy.

 

You can also check out Pinterest activities--that's where I found the idea to print out a page with his name listed ten or so times, sometimes spelled correctly and sometimes incorrectly, and ask him to look carefully at them and tell/mark which ones are right.

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My pre-k'er is just going to be loosey goosey this year.  I gathered a couple of resources and used them to compile a list of learning goals I want him to know by the end of Kinder and I'll just kind of work on them informally.. or maybe next year more formally.. lol  My two main things for him to work on this year is Math U See Primer w/ blocks and Reading Eggs.  For "science" he'll observe, and maybe have a worksheet/craft, of whatever topic big sissy has for the week.  History, Art, Music Bible the same..

PS  I am going to go check out those Rod and Staff workbooks though.. I've heard rave reviews from many about them..  Have fun!

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Starfall.com and Easy Peasy for phonics, if you don't mind screen time.

 

We are also big fans of HWT and Rod and Staff for preschool. Before Five in a Row has great picture book suggestions and craft ideas.

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Pre-School- duplos, wedgits, homemade edible playdoh in many flavors including peanut butter and marshmallow, Lauri Toys Primer Pak, colored shaving cream in the tub, nursery rhymes, classic children's songs and board books.

 

letteroftheweek.com

Before Five in a Row

Picture Book Activities by Trish Kuffner

 

macaroni noodles, glitter glue, finger paints, stickers, construction paper

 

Another vote for starfall

 

I also second the Kumon workbooks: My First Book of Tracing, Mazes, Numbers 1-30, etc. put them in a basket with c-rods, clocks, giant dice, dominoes, cards, pattern blocks (I like the magnetic ones. We used them on a metal TV tray.), easy pattern block cards, measuring cups and spoons, a floppy soft plastic/ rubber ruler, counters (like the little plastic bears), and all those kinds of things.

 

HTH-

Mandy

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I'm using ideas from the book "Teach Your Child To Read in 10 Minutes a Day" for my 3 year old. She loves it, and I'd say we do about 5-10 minutes 4-5 days a week, and even with just that she is progressing very well.

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I knew I would get great ideas and I promise we have tried some of these.  But hearing from this group and getting a good list (multiple votes) just makes me so much surer about what we do and where we should go next.  Thanks again for taking the time.

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DD also loves the Kumon fine motor skill workbooks.

 

For math, we actually started RightStart A at a snail's pace when she was two and we're picking up steam with it now at age three.

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I have another question for the group. My second child (boy - 3 years and 3 months old) is at the point where I feel I need to start some sort of formal learning/ work. Until now we have been reading to him everyday; playing with duplos, cars, trains; used leapfrog dvds, and take him outdoors - park, pool, etc whenever we can. I would like to get ideas on what/ where would be a good place to start for math,reading and writing.

 

We did a lot of what you describe and that was really enough at three as far as early childhood education. It sounds like your doing great :)

 

I have looked at HWT and like it. I have used AAS with my older daughter (7 years old) and thought I could use their AAR program with my 3 year old. Confused about my options with math. We did not use any formal math curriculum for our daughter when she was young and now we use Miquon and Singapore during summer and winter breaks (to supplement school) so would like to know if these programs are good for the preschool years as well.

 

I haven't used AAR or Miquon so couldn't help you with that. I did HWOT for my dd, then 5, and bought her a pre-k book because I was not sure if we'd do k over 2 years or not. When I got the book it looked to easy for her so I kept it for him in the future and got her a k one. He ended up wanting to do HWOT too, so I let him do the multisensory activities and pre-k workbook without much expectation of retaining the info about letter names and sounds but more an intro to the concept if letters and numbers. I did not follow the HWOT guidelines but used mfw units and so did the letter in the order presented by mfw. HWOT was a supplement, not a substitution for, mfw k, if that makes sense. I got the HWOT teachers guide this year and plan to use it as written this year, with ds now 4, in anticipation of learning his letter names and sounds. We will repeat the pre-k book though.

 

I used Singapore Early Bird math for dd. I would not recommend book A for a child under 5.

 

I would not teach any formal phonics or reading for a child as young as yours either.

 

Any other thoughts/ directions/ advice/ critiques would help - thanks!

Don't know if this is helpful but here's what we did for preschool at 3:

 

BFIAR - rowed a book a week and did a simple activity (10 minutes)

Rod & Staff- 1-2 worksheet pages a day in the About Three Series (5 minutes)

MFW preschool package- one a day, so I chose the activity (so we steadily rotated between the 5 skill areas the index cards are grouped) and he picked the toy (5 minutes)

 

He joined dd for all of mfw k activities except math and Lang seat work, Spanish, and HWOT, modified of course to his level unless the activity was more seat work like.

 

We typically spent about 2 hours on school with him actively participating, but the bulk of this was hands on projects, read alouds, crafts, etc., not seat work.

 

I don't think you need to do anything yet, but if you'd like some direction we'd do HWOT, R&S, BFIAR and MFW preschool package again.

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My oldest did Saxon Math K at 3. There is no writing till the end. It's mainly playing with manipulatives. You can use stuff around the house too. If he is planning on attending ps Saxon is good because it's set up a lot like it. In K the lesson comes in a meeting form and slowly spirals into learning that the kid barely notices. It's only meant for 3 days a week but we did it 5 because they think they are just playing. They answer questions and move things around like shapes and counting bears.

 

I also love Rod n Staff About 3 series! I wish I had remembered to buy it for my ds when I put my order in. I have the 4-5yr old series untouched here (more boring) and so we are going to use that instead to use it up.

 

Check out "The Three R's" by Ruth Beechick for easy ways to teach reading without frustrating the child.

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I'd suggest you to go through the curricula of top preschools (such as MontClare Preschool). Go through their program and look at what their teachers do so as to make preschool teaching interesting.

 

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I recently became acquainted with The Homegrown Preschooler.  I loved their book and I am considering their preschool curriculum.  I love that it is so age appropriate without being workbookish.  We have also done Before Five in a Row and really enjoyed that as well. 

 

http://www.thehomegrownpreschooler.com/

 

 

 

 

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Do a search for pre writing worksheets. My daughter used to love those. I also found cutting practice sheets. The Rod and Staff books are good too. My daughter went through the first one quickly so now I put them in a page protector and let her use it with a dry erase marker.

 

The Early Bird or Essential Math books by Singapore could be a good beginning math. The Education Unboxed videos are great too.

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Some kids like workbooks and are ready for it. Others aren't. Some kids who are ready to read are not ready to write. If your child wants some workbooks to do, you can pick up some easy ones at Target or Barnes and Noble, etc. there really isn't a need to spend a ton of money on workbooks that all include the alphabet. I also agree with Kumon workbooks or Leapfrog ones at Target dollar spots.

 

My son will be three next year, and he has shown an interest in doing "school" like his big brothers and has already learned most of his letter sounds, shapes, and colors. I plan on doing a letter of the week with him. Some activities include drawing letters, crafts, tactile learning activities such as tracing letters in salt, etc. I will get him an alphabet workbook he can start with as he has shown an interest in writing. We will do letter scavenger hunts, snacks that start with that letter, stories, etc. lots of ideas on Pinterest for this.

 

When he turns four, I might get a bit more formal. I think Saxon K program is great for k4 with lots of counting and games. I may start our SSRW depending on his readiness level.

 

If you want to do some science exploration, I highly recommend the Mudpies to Magnets book. Great hands on science for that age.

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Hello everyone,

 

I am new to the forum.

 

I am living in Calgary, Canada with my family and I am looking for a daycare preschool for my 3 year old son.

 

So is there anyone who knows any good daycare at Calgary then please let me know as early as possible.

 

One of my friends suggest me this Daycare Preschool Calgary.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

 

Edited by kiara22

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I don't do any workbooks with 3 yr olds. I have on hand lots of workbooky stuff from The Dollar Tree. They have sticker books where the kid matches the stickers by color to the right pages that my dd LOVED from 2-3. She would do the same ones over and over. And they only cost a dollar, so I would stock up on them whenever I went. They also have sticker books with different themes like ocean creatures and farm animals. When she gets on a kick of some sort we will find one to match. I keep the paint with water and other odds and ends books and coloring books for her when she wants them. She can paint in them, cut from them, color, glue, whatever while we do school. She often will cut up a whole book just about as we do read alouds. Or she will be on a painting kick and will paint a cardboard box that she plays in as a fort while we do family read alouds. My older kids have arts and crafts they work on throughout the day and during read alouds, so she naturally asks for something that she wants to do. But none of it is required.  She doesn't have to follow any instructions unless she is craving it. 

 

Things I have on hand and pull from when I want a planned lesson of some sort: 

Slow and Steady Get Me Ready

Little Devotions for Little People

Before Five in a Row

Letteroftheweek dot com

 

She attends two different co-op classes weekly. One is doing the Letteroftheweek dot com and one is doing unit studies around Dr. Seuss books. So honestly, most of her actual school time comes from those as well as her dance classes and Sunday school and Children's church. I do help coordinate lessons for most of her outside classes. But I don't do much planned lesson time at home since she has those.  But even if she didn't, I would do much planned besides the things you are already doing like reading aloud daily from whatever and much provided educational activities and outdoor time at this age. 

 

At four with all of mine I have started some more actual school time. It has been a good time to transition. I LOVE the Rod and STaff ABC preschool workbook series. I have it ready to go with her when she turns four.  With one of mine we did the R&S ABC series over K4 and K5, slowly working into R&S 1st grade reading and math by the second semester of K5, stretching the 1st grade over a year and a half that way. 

 

The other one at 4 used a storebought preschool workbook on top of learning to read with Bob books and other readers. She was beyond the R&S series by that time. She jumped into R&S 1st grade for her K5 year. 

 

With this one, since she is doing LOTW at co-op, I will start the R&S ABC series at age 4, but will continue them and redo the LOTW next year for her official K4 alongside them. I don't know where she will be by her K year. But we will move into R&S 1st grade materials whenever she is ready. 

 

LOTW or FIAR give good readaloud suggestions and little unit study ideas to spice things up alongside workbooks. We usually get a lot of that from co-op classes or library storytimes, but do little units all through preschool and early elementary from a variety of places including tons of freebie units I have collected over the years on my computer. 

 

I have taught two other preschoolers in my home for preK (K4) and have used slight variations of these things. One knew his letters quite well, so I jumped him right into reading Bob Books and had him reading quite well before he started public school k. With the other one, I used the R&S ABC workbooks for bookwork and we tried Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons because I had it and wanted to try it. She progressed, but I wasn't super in love with it and won't use it again. 

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