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What's on yr 6th grade reading list?


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Am putting together a reading list for 6th grade. Would love a mix of classics and contemporary. I am going for quality over quantity, as I want to leave plenty of time for free reading.

So far, we are considering Robin Hood, Rainbow People, the Giver, roll of thunder, hear my cry.....I have seashell collection of poetry as well, The Sea Around Us,

Alternates: Enders Game, westing game, ink heart, Snow Treasure......

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Here it is in its entirety:

 

Dragonwings

Redwall

House of 60 Fathers

Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze

Airborn (we'll see if we get to this one)

Gentle Ben

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

Li Lun, Lad of Courage

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

The Cat Who Went to Heaven

The Winged Watchman

Hoot 

The Kite Fighters

Holes

Bridge to Terabithia

The Incredible Journey

Call It Courage

Peter and the Starcatchers (I may read this to them)

 

History:

 

Ancient Egypt: Tales of Gods and Pharoahs

The Gilgamesh Trilogy (the comic book-looking one)

Greek Myths

The Bronze Bow

Hittite Warrior

A Door in the Wall

Castle Diary

The Great and Terrible Quest

Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great

Adam of the Road (iffy about this one)

 

Sorta-Poetry (reading this with the younger ones):

 

Romeo and Juliet for Kids

Midsummer Nights Dream for Kids

 

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Still revising, but plan to include most of the WTM sixth grade list. So far:

Beowulf (Nye)
Inferno cantos I-V --shared reading
Canterbury prologue and Mccaughrean retelling (not sure about this one)
Tales of the Crusades (Coolidge)
The Boy's King Arthur or Pyle's Robin Hood, maybe both depending
The Bronze Bow
Treasure Island
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Tolkien) -- shared reading
McCaughrean's version of Faerie Queen
Men of Iron (we may listen to this one as an audiobook)
Macbeth (shared)
The Yearling
Adam of the Road

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Here's ours.  The first section is "the list" that goes with history, we're doing history & lit integrated this year, covering the modern era.  The second section we won't get through all of it this year - we're going to work through Figuratively Speaking over the next two years, reading mostly poems and short stories that illustrate the literary devices.  I think this will be  a fun way to cover poetry & short stories that are not tied to the history schedule/era.  I haven't previewed all of those selections yet, so some will probably be dropped if I decide they are too intense.

 

I don't know why the formatting got all goofy there, sorry. . .

 

6th Grade Reading List - History & Literature

 

All of a Kind Family – Sydney Taylor

Letters from Rifka – Karen Hesse

The Great Wheel - Lawson

 In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson  - the Asian immigrant experience

The Hope Chest (Schwabach) women's suffrage

Mama's Bank Account (Forbes)

The Earth Dragon Awakes (Yep) -- (gr. 7-9) 1906 San Francisco earthquake

Dragonwings (Yep) -- (gr. 7-9) turn-of-the-century Chinese immigrants to the US

Angel on the Square (Whelan) -- historical fiction; 1914 Russian empire crumbling

Around the World in 80 Days – Jules Verne (read aloud)

Kim – Rudyard Kipling

Journey to the Center of the Earth – Jules Verne

The Good Master – Kate Saredy

The Singing Tree – Kate Saredy

Charlotte Sometimes – Penelope Farmer

Things Fall Apart – Yeats

 The Maltese Falcon – Dashiel Hammet

 Strong Poison – Dorothy L. Sayers

Murder on the Orient Express – Agatha Christie

Witness for the Prosecution – Agatha Christie

Cheaper By the Dozen (Gilbraith) -- 1920s America big family;

The Most Dangerous Game" (Connell) -- adventure short story with a twist; WW1 is referenced

 Let Us Now Praise Famous Men – James Agee (read together)

 The Grapes of Wrath – Steinbeck – Ch. 1 & 5 only

Out of the Dust – Karen Hesse

Ida Early Comes Over the Mountain – Robert Burch

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry – Mildred Taylor

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman – Ernest Gaines

Francie – Karen English

The Friendship – Mildred Taylor

Bud, Not Buddy – Christopher Paul Curtis

 Leon’s Story – Walter Tillage

Number the Stars – Lois Lowry

 The Winged Watchman – Hilda Van Stockum

 Early Sunday Morning – Barry Denenberg

Hiroshima (Yep) -- WW2 after math of Japanese atomic bomb victims come to US for treatment

 Lily’s Crossing – Patricia Reilly Giff

 The Mysterious Edge of the Heroic World – EL Koningsberg

 Escape From Warsaw (Serrailier)-- Polish children surviving without their parents during WW2Winged Watchman (Stockum) -- Danish families under Nazi WW2 occupation

The Endless Steppe (Hautzig) -- Russians banished to Siberia during WW2

Starring Sally J Freedman as Herself – Judy Blume

 Good Old Boy – Willie Morris

The Year of Miss Agnes – Kirkpatrick Hill

Bertie’s War – Barbara Blakely

The Pushcart War (Merrill)

 Animal Farm – George Orwell (Read together)

Breaking Stalin’s Nose – Eugene Yelchin

Between Shades of Gray – Ruta Sepetys

 Iggie’s House – Judy Blume

Coming of Age in Mississippi – Anne Moody

Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze – Elizabeth Lewis Own

The Cat Who Went to Heaven – Elizabeth Coatsworth

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon – Grace Lin

Journey to Jo’burg – Beverley Naidoo

Alia's Mission: Saving the Books of Iraq (Stamaty)

Breadwinner, and the sequel, Pavanna's Journey (Ellis)

 Full Cupboard of Life (Smith) 

Holes – Louis Sachar

Lupita Manana – Patricia Beatty

The City of Ember – Jeanne DuPrau (and sequels)

Among the Hidden – Haddix (and sequels)

The Giver – Lois Lowry (and sequels)

 

Poetry & Short Stories to read w/ Figuratively Speaking:

Read Henry Wadsworth Longfellow – Autumn Within

Read Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - The Rainy Day

Read Edgar Guest – Home

Read Hans Christian Anderson – Something

Read American Tall Tales by Mary Pope Osborne (Johnny Appleseed, Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill)The Phantom Tollbooth – Norton Juster

A Story Without an End – Mark Twain

Read Twas the Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore

Read The Hollow Men – TS Eliot

Read Li Po Taking Leave of a Friend

Read Jazz Fantasia by Carl Sandburg

Read Emily Dickinson’s She Sweeps with Many-Colored Brooms

Read A Forest Hymn – William Cullen Bryant

Read Thirty-Five by Sarah Josepha Hale

Read Winter Dreams – F Scott Fitzgerald

Read The New Colossus – Emma Lazarus

Read The Darkling Thrush – Thomas Hardy Read Emily Dickinson – There is a Solitude of Space Read Emily Dickinson – Much Madness is Divinest Sense Read Emily Dickinson – My Life Closed Twice Before Its Close Read John Donne – Death Be Not Proud Read Aesop’s Fable The Mice in Council Read The Cat Who Walks Alone by Rudyard Kipling Read The Grass So Little Has to Do – Emily Dickinson Read The Walrus and the Carpenter – Lewis Carroll Read O Captain my Captain – Walt Whitman Read Ode to the West Wind – Percy Bysse Shelley Evening by Robert Frost Read Dr Heidegger’s Experiment by Nathaniel Hawthorne Read The Scarlet Ibis by James Hurst The Old Man and the Sea – Hemingway Across the Bridge – Graham Greene Read The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe Read The Bells by Edgar Allen Poe Read The Wreck of Hesperus by Henry Longfellow Read The Hayloft by Robert Louis Stevenson Read I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing by Walt Whitman

Read The Chambered Nautilus by Oliver Wendell Holmes

Read The Arsenal at Springfield by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Read Ode to the Confederate Dead by Henry Timrod

Read Beat! Beat! Drums by Walt Whitman

Read Hampton Beach by John Greenleaf Whittier

Read The First Snowfall by James Russell Lowell

Read The Marshes of Glynn by Sidney Lanier

Read War is Kind by Stephen Crane

Read Upon the Burning of Our House by Anne Bradstreet

Read Early Moon by Carl Sandburg

Read Annabel Lee by Edgar Allen Poe

Read Swift Things are Beautiful by Elizabeth Coatsworth

Read Matsuo Basho haikus

Read Adelaid Crapsey cinquains

Read The Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear

Read The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear

Read John Skelton Skeltonic verses

Read The Princess by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Read Lepanto by GK Chesterton

Read The Congo by Vachel Lindsay

Read The Sound of the Sea by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Read Seal by William Jay Smith

Read Hunting Song - Native American poem

Read Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson

Read Jabberwocky by Louis Carroll

Read I Will Fight No More Forever by Chief Joseph

Read The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

Read Preamble to the Constitution of the United States

Listen to a portion of Frederick Douglass – Untie His Hands

Read Edgar Allan Poe – A Predicament

The Bells – Edgar Allan Poe

*The Open Boat – Stephen Crane

Do Not Weep Maiden, For War is Kind – Stephen Crane

Reginald – Saki

Read The Duel by Eugene Field

Read Mother Goose rhymes

Read The Blessed Damozel – Dane Rossetti

Read An Alphabet of Famous Goops by Gelett Burgess

Read aloud Tartuffe by Moliere

 

Listen to Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant – Thanatopsis

Listen to Sea Fever by John Masefield

Listen to Recessional by Rudyard Kipling

Read There Is No Frigate Like a Book by Emily Dickinson

Read and listen to Preludes by T.S. Eliot

Read and listen to Song of the Redwood Tree by Walt Whitman

Read The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Read The Lighthouse by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Read The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Read Endymion by John Keats

Read Trees by Joyce Kilmer

Read Be Strong by Maltbie Davenport Babcock

Read My Kate by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Read Ode to the West Wind by Percy Shelley

Read Susan Blue by Kate Greenaway

Read Rain by Robert Louis Stevenson

Read On the Grassy Banks by Christina Rossetti

Read Over the River and Through the Woods by Lydia Maria Child

*Read Why I Live at the P.O. – Eudora Welty

The Hollow Men – T. S. Eliot

Read Red, Red Rose by Robert Burns and listen to a recitation

Read The Favorite Uncle Remus by Joel Chandler Harris

Captain Jim’s Friend – Bret Harte

Read The Bet by Anton Chekhov

Read Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain

Read Main Travelled Roads by Hamlin Garland (read aloud)

*The Fall of the House of Usher - Poe

Trial by Combat – Shirley Jackson

The Scapegoat – Paul Laurence Dunbar

Read O Henry’s The Gift of the Magi; A Retrieved Reformation; The Cop & the Anthem

Read The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde

Read Sarah Orne Jewett – The Country of the Pointed First

Read A Marriage Proposal by Anton Chekhov

The Bet – Anton Chekov

The Rubber Plant’s Story -O. Henry

The Bottle Imp – Robert Louis Stevenson

*The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas – Ursula Le Guin

A Predicament – Edgar Allan Poe

*A Rose for Emily – William Faulkner

Read The Lady, or the Tiger by Frank Stockton

Read The Treasures of Lemon Brown

Read Mannahatta by Walt Whitman

Read e e cummings

The Importance of Being Ernest – Oscar Wilde

Read Ain’t I a Woman Speech by Sojourner Truth

Listen to Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death by Patrick Henry

 

Read L'Art by Ezra Pound

The Annotated Twas the Night Before Christmas

Read A Marriage Proposal – Anton Chekov

Read The Storyteller by Saki

Read The Open Window by Saki and go over study guide.

Read A Story Without an End – Mark Twain

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge – Ambrose Bierce

The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock – T S Eliot

*The Lottery – Shirley Jackson

Read O Henry - Hearts and Hands

Read An Inhabitant of Carcosa – Ambrose Bierce

The Third Level – Jack Finney

The Face in the Photo – Jack Finney

Read The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – Agatha Christie

A Harlem Tragedy" (Henry) -- adult short story; dark humor look (with a twist ending) at domestic abuse in turn-of-the-century NY tenement living by O. Henry -- with my high school aged DSs, we had a great discussion on how the "dark humor" of this story allowed Henry to make social commentary on a very dicey and hidden topic of abuse -- you may want to wait on this one until your student can make these connections and leaps

Read The Monkey’s Paw by WW Jacobs

*The Tell-Tale Heart – Poe

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Rose, please don't tell me your child can read all that in a year????

 

 

:lol:  Well, she did read over 100 books in 5th grade, so I'm not gonna say it's impossible, but no, that isn't my expectation.  I don't know if you saw my thread on the Logic board, but we're covering modern history by topic, and we have 12 topics, and I expect her to read at least two fiction books per topic, but in some cases I'm giving her 5 or 6 to choose from.  So this list includes a range of choices for a bunch of different topics.  I imagine she'll read around 50 books altogether.  Obviously we won't discuss and write about each one!  Again, it's 12 topics, and she'll write about at least 1 fiction & 1 nonfiction per topic, so that's covering ~12-15 fiction books in great detail.

 

And then with the short stories and poems that go with figuratively speaking, I expect the whole list could take us two years, we'll just see how it goes.

 

This is a child who read voraciously, but is pretty happy to have me come home from the library with a stack of books and say "Here, check these out, my boardie friends said you might like them."  So I can direct her reading - which she'd be doing anyway - toward the topics/books/time periods we are studying.  Make sense?

 

ETA: I just counted the History/Lit book list, and it's about 60.  I bet she'll read most of those.  I don't make her finish books she doesn't like after the first 3-4 chapters.  So I think 50 is about right, with ~15 getting a deeper treatment.

Most of the Figuratively Speaking list will be done via read aloud/discussion, so I don't really count those as things she's going off and reading on her own.

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My dd reads voraciously but I pick a book a month that we spend more time on. So far this month she has read

A wrinkle in time. - our lit book
A Hero's guide to saving your kingdom
A Hero's guide to storming the castle
St Nicholas by Demi
Little Oh
Ida early comes over the mountain
Wonder
Medieval tales
Castle diary- the journal of tobia burgess
The adventures of sir Balin
The adventures of sir Givret
The adventures of sir Lancelot

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I have a reluctant sixth grade reader. She'll be reading the following, but some of the nonfictions she won't read every chapter: 

 

The Bible

Trial and Triumph

School of the Woods

It Couldn't Just Happen

Einstein and the Theory of Relativity

Storybook of Science

The Hobbit 

The Von Trapp Family Singers 

The Bronze Bow

The Little Duke

Favorite Poems Old and New

 

That's it! She doesn't like to read, so all these are assigned, narrated books. 

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Rose, please don't tell me your child can read all that in a year????

 

That's what I was thinking!  That's almost 2 books a week if you follow a 36 week school year.  It took us weeks to get through Kim.  Ugh!  My ds's would keel over right then and there if I gave them that list.  :lol:

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That's what I was thinking!  That's almost 2 books a week if you follow a 36 week school year.  It took us weeks to get through Kim.  Ugh!  My ds's would keel over right then and there if I gave them that list.  :lol:

 

:lol: I haven't decided for sure we're doing Kim, for that exact reason!  If you look at the list you notice most of them aren't particularly "heavy" or "literary", there are a few, but most of these are 4th-7th grade reading level, and yeah, she easily reads 2-3 books a week, 52 weeks a year.  So having 1/3-1/2  of those be relevant to the time period we are studying and/or things I think will stretch her doesn't seem like too much to me.  At least, it wasn't last year! But every kid is different, of course.

 

And it's not like I give her the whole list and say, "get started! you're behind already!"  :D  We'll spend ~3 weeks on each of the 12 topics, and for each topic, there is a small stack of fiction and NF books to choose from.  So it's not overwhelming when it's actually happening, it just looks like a lot when you write it all out in a list - which I hadn't actually done till Halcyon asked!

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I have a reluctant sixth grade reader. She'll be reading the following, but some of the nonfictions she won't read every chapter: 

 

The Bible

Trial and Triumph

School of the Woods

It Couldn't Just Happen

Einstein and the Theory of Relativity

Storybook of Science

The Hobbit 

The Von Trapp Family Singers 

The Bronze Bow

The Little Duke

Favorite Poems Old and New

 

That's it! She doesn't like to read, so all these are assigned, narrated books. 

 

 

This sounds a little like my list.  We will be covering modern history then on to ancients.

 

The Bible

Trial and Triumph

SOTW 4

Never Give In (Winston Churchill biography)

The Bronze Bow

Ben Hur (?)

Augustus Caesar's World

Story of the Greeks

Story of the Romans

The Story of David Livingstone

A bio of Albert Einstein

Archimedes and the Door of Science

Galileo and the Magic Numbers

The Hobbit

Animal Farm

Black Ships Before Troy (Sutcliff) or Tales of Troy (Lang)
Poetry: Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, Alfred Noyes

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I have to wait till I can get my friend's Sonlight from her (I'm borrowing it for history this year) so I haven't planned a lot yet. 

We are for sure doing:

 

King Arthur by Green

Across Five Aprils

Number the Stars

Westing Game

Poetry: Kipling, Whittier, Longfellow and Dunbar

I have a few short stories I've selected to discuss

 

To beef up Sonlight Core E, I'm having him read:

Alexander Graham Bell biography (Always Inventing)

George Washington Carver biog. (Sowers)

Michael Faraday, Father of Electronics

Abraham Lincoln's World

Story of Inventions

 

I also have him read a book of his choice off the "free read list" from Ambleside.  These are more "literature" type books. He'll be in year 5 and usually only reads one per month or so.

The ones that I've already bought (so he doesn't really get a choice after all, lol) are:

Treasure Island

Goodbye Mr. Chips

Lad, a Dog

Anne of Green Gables

 

We'll be doing Oliver Twist, a couple of Shakespeare plays and Kim as well, but those will be read-a-louds or audiobooks and we'll discuss.

 

And then of course whatever is included in Sonlight.  I haven't got to look through this yet, so I'm not sure if the reading level is what I'm hoping for.  If it is, we might cut back some of the extra history but if not we might be adding.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's ours.  The first section is "the list" that goes with history, we're doing history & lit integrated this year, covering the modern era.  The second section we won't get through all of it this year - we're going to work through Figuratively Speaking over the next two years, reading mostly poems and short stories that illustrate the literary devices.  I think this will be  a fun way to cover poetry & short stories that are not tied to the history schedule/era.  I haven't previewed all of those selections yet, so some will probably be dropped if I decide they are too intense.

 

I don't suppose you'd like to put the corresponding number of the Figuratively Speaking lesson behind the readings you are going to use ?

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Sure, that's easy!  Here it is, though I don't know why the formatting is all screwy.

 

Figuratively Speaking Course Outline – 30 lessons (some will take multiple days!)

*These short stories are in The Art of the Short Story by Dana Gioia, along with pieces by their authors

 

Part 1 – Figurative Language

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 1 - Denotation and Connotation

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow – Autumn Within

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - The Rainy Day

Edgar Guest – Home (online)

Hans Christian Anderson – Something (online)

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 2 - Hyperbole

American Tall Tales by Mary Pope Osborne (Johnny Appleseed, Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill)

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 3 – Idiom

                The Phantom Tollbooth – Norton Juster

                A Story Without an End – Mark Twain

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 4 – Imagery

Twas the Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore

The Hollow Men – TS Eliot

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 5 - Metaphor and Simile

Li Po Taking Leave of a Friend

Jazz Fantasia by Carl Sandburg

Emily Dickinson’s She Sweeps with Many-Colored Brooms

A Forest Hymn – William Cullen Bryant

Thirty-Five by Sarah Josepha Hale

Winter Dreams – F Scott Fitzgerald

The New Colossus – Emma Lazarus The Darkling Thrush – Thomas Hardy   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 6 - Oxymoron and Paradox

Emily Dickinson – There is a Solitude of Space

Emily Dickinson – Much Madness is Divinest Sense

Emily Dickinson – My Life Closed Twice Before Its Close

John Donne – Death Be Not Proud

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 7 - Personification

Aesop’s Fable The Mice in Council

The Cat Who Walks Alone by Rudyard Kipling

The Grass So Little Has to Do – Emily Dickinson

The Walrus and the Carpenter – Lewis Carroll

 

Apostrophe:

O Captain my Captain – Walt Whitman

Ode to the West Wind – Percy Bysse Shelley

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 8 - Symbol

Mending Wall, Home Burial, The Road Not Taken, and Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Dr Heidegger’s Experiment by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Ibis by James Hurst

The Old Man and the Sea – Hemingway

Across the Bridge – Graham Greene

  Part 2: Poetic Language   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 9 – Alliteration

 The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe

The Bells by Edgar Allen Poe

The Wreck of Hesperus by Henry Longfellow

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 10 - Assonance and Consonance

The Hayloft by Robert Louis Stevenson

I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing by Walt Whitman

The Chambered Nautilus by Oliver Wendell Holmes

The Arsenal at Springfield by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Ode to the Confederate Dead by Henry Timrod

Beat! Beat! Drums by Walt Whitman

Hampton Beach by John Greenleaf Whittier

The First Snowfall by James Russell Lowell

The Marshes of Glynn by Sidney Lanier

War is Kind by Stephen Crane

Upon the Burning of Our House by Anne Bradstreet

Early Moon by Carl Sandburg

Annabel Lee by Edgar Allen Poe

Swift Things are Beautiful by Elizabeth Coatsworth

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 11 - Form

Matsuo Basho haikus

Adelaid Crapsey cinquains

The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear

John Skelton Skeltonic verses

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 12 - Onomatopoeia

The Princess by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Lepanto by GK Chesterton

The Congo by Vachel Lindsay

The Sound of the Sea by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Seal by William Jay Smith

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 13 - Parallelism

Hunting Song - Native American poem

Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson

Jabberwocky by Louis Carroll

I Will Fight No More Forever by Chief Joseph

 The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

Preamble to the Constitution of the United States

Frederick Douglass – Untie His Hands

Edgar Allan Poe – A Predicament

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 14 - Repetition and Refrain                 The Bells – Edgar Allan Poe                 Do Not Weep Maiden, For War is Kind – Stephen Crane                 Reginald – Saki   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 15 - Rhyme

The Duel by Eugene Field

                The Blessed Damozel – Dante Rossetti

An Alphabet of Famous Goops by Gelett Burgess

Read aloud Tartuffe by Moliere

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 16 - Rhythm

 Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant

 Sea Fever by John Masefield

 Recessional by Rudyard Kipling

There Is No Frigate Like a Book by Emily Dickinson

Read and listen to Preludes by T.S. Eliot

Read and listen to Song of the Redwood Tree by Walt Whitman

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 17 - Run-on (Enjambed) and End-stopped Lines

The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Lighthouse by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost                 Endymion by John Keats   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 18 - Stanza

Trees by Joyce Kilmer

Be Strong by Maltbie Davenport Babcock

My Kate by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Ode to the West Wind by Percy Shelley

Susan Blue by Kate Greenaway

Rain by Robert Louis Stevenson

On the Grassy Banks by Christina Rossetti

Over the River and Through the Woods by Lydia Maria Child

  Part 3: Literary Techniques   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 19 – Allusion

*Read Why I Live at the P.O. – Eudora Welty

The Hollow Men – T. S. Eliot

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 20 - Characters and Characterization   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 21 - Conflict   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 22 - Dialect

Red, Red Rose by Robert Burns and listen to a recitation

The Favorite Uncle Remus by Joel Chandler Harris

Captain Jim’s Friend – Bret Harte

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 23 - Dialogue                 Pick a short story that is mostly dialogue, read just the dialog and see if you can follow the story   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 24 - Flashback

The Bet by Anton Chekhov

Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 25 - Foreshadowing

Main Travelled Roads by Hamlin Garland (read aloud)

*The Fall of the House of Usher - Poe

Trial by Combat – Shirley Jackson

The Scapegoat – Paul Laurence Dunbar

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 26 - Genre                 A Sherlock Holmes tale                 A Poe Tale   Figuratively Speaking Chapter 27 - Irony

O Henry’s The Gift of the Magi; A Retrieved Reformation; The Cop & the Anthem

The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 28 - Local Color

Sarah Orne Jewett – The Country of the Pointed First

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 29 - Mood and Tone

A Marriage Proposal by Anton Chekhov

The Rubber Plant’s Story -O. Henry

*Read The Fall of the House of Usher – Edgar Allan Poe

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 30 - Moral and Theme

Aesop’s Fables

The Bottle Imp – Robert Louis Stevenson

*The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas – Ursula Le Guin

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 31 – Narrator/Point of View

A Predicament – Edgar Allan Poe

*A Rose for Emily – William Faulkner

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 32 - Plot

The Lady, or the Tiger by Frank Stockton

The Treasures of Lemon Brown

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 33 - Poetic License

Mannahatta by Walt Whitman

e e cummings

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 34 - Pun

The Importance of Being Ernest – Oscar Wilde

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 35 - Rhetorical Question

Ain’t I a Woman Speech by Sojourner Truth

Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death by Patrick Henry

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 36 - Satire, Parody, and Farce

L'Art by Ezra Pound

The Annotated Twas the Night Before Christmas

A Marriage Proposal – Anton Chekov

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 37 - Story Within a Story

The Storyteller by Saki

The Open Window by Saki and go over study guide.

A Story Without an End – Mark Twain

 

Figuratively Speaking Chapter 38 - Stream of Consciousness

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge – Ambrose Bierce

The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock – T S Eliot

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 39 - Surprise Ending

                *The Lottery – Shirley Jackson

O Henry - Hearts and Hands

The Third Level – Jack Finney

The Face in the Photo – Jack Finney

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – Agatha Christie

A Harlem Tragedy – O Henry

  Figuratively Speaking Chapter 40 - Suspense Literary Term

Read The Monkey’s Paw by WW Jacobs

*The Tell-Tale Heart – Poe

Read And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie & do the Boomerang discussion questions

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Going against the trend, here is my short list of sixth grade literature:

 

Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Benet, The Devil and Daniel Webster

Nesbit, The Railway Children

Spare, The Bronze Bow

Keith, Rifles for Watie

British and American poetry

 

We follow the guidelines in How to Read a Book for our literature studies.  She read a lot on her own, but this is what she studied.

 

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I tried to get a variety of books.  My DD isn't a huge reader, so I don't think she'll get through all of these.  They do free reading in the evenings as well, but I don't assign anything for that.

 

Here is our list:

By the Great Horn Spoon

Just So Stories

The Hobbit

Cheaper by the Dozen

King of the Golden River

Miracles on Maple Hill

The Railway Children

 

To go with history:

The Golden Goblet

Hittite Warrior

The Bronze Bow

Detectives in Togas

The Cat of Bubastes (I'll probably read this aloud)

 

We'll also be reading Chronicles of Narnia as a family this year.  If we finish that, I'm hoping to get to Farmer Boy and At the Back of the North Wind.  We'll also do a poet study of Lewis Carroll sometime during the year...We started Favorite Poems Old and New  last spring and will continue with it as well.  

 

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  • 8 months later...

Just since this was bumped, and I was skimming back through  it . . . . Shannon has read about 120 books this year so far.  Not all the books I put on that list, a lot of them I pre-read and decided weren't right for her, and a few she started and didn't enjoy, but about 50 historical fiction or literary works and nonfiction that she's read, and another 20 or so children's classics that I've read aloud (the rest were pleasure reading, of . . . variable literary merit ;) ).  We did the Poetry portion of Fig Speaking in 6th and will study Short Stories in 7th.  

 

Just in the interests of truth in advertising and all . . . I often wonder how many of our grandiose plans work out the way we, well, planned them to!  ;)

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I haven't made a list for my 6th grader yet....we will be using Mosdos Pearl then I'll probably choose some books for a book basket and let her do the same..... There are some great ideas here! We are getting ready to go through TTC to help us talk about books. Possibly starting a middle school Lit Club, too.

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I decided to do books from different genres next year.  We will also do some short stories/poetry in addition to this and don't know what I am using there yet.  She will also read one novel a month for her book club in addition to this list. 

 

Biography/Memoir:  Escape: The Story of the Great Houdini by Sid Fleischman

 

Realistic Fiction:  Anything but Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin (the story of life through the eyes of a 12 year old autistic boy)

 

Science Fiction/Fantasy:  Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine

 

Nonfiction:  Blizzard: The Storm that Changed America by Jim Murphy

 

Mystery: Shakespeare's Secret by Elise Broach

 

Historical Fiction:  The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare

 

Adventure:  Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O'Dell

 

Humor:  A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck

 

Animal Stories:  Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

 

In Other Lands:  Stories from The Arabian Nights

 

These books were selected specifically with my daughter in mind and are books that fit my categories and will appeal to her.  She loves projects so I plan to have her work on hands on type projects as "book reports" that go with each book.  The books for her book club will be discussed with her group with guidance from parents. This plan will challenge but not overwhelm my soon to be 6th grader. 

 

 

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I've been working on my language arts plan. Here is what it is looking like right now.

 

Resources I plan to use through all of middle school:

 

Figuratively Speaking over 6th-8th grades (13 lessons each year)

 

Memoria Press Poetry for Grammar Stage over 6th and 7th (17 poems each year)

 

Memoria Press Poetry and Short Stories American Lit (8 selections each year)

 

Christian Light Reading (6th and 7th grade books with Light Units) Each unit takes 3 weeks to complete, will do 3 units each year with one during a summer (10 total)

 

 

6th grade whole books: (will probably try some lit guides)

 

Historical Fiction:

The Golden Goblet

Hittite Warrior

Archimedes and the Door of Science

Detectives in Togas

The Bronze Bow

 

Lit:

My Side of the Mountain

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

Holes

Tuck Everlasting

 

I'm still working on book selections for 7th and 8th. He'll study world history in 7th and American history in 8th, so the historical fiction will fit into those studies. 

 

 

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