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I don't know about OM, but I don't find Waldorf to be less rigorous; I just find it to have different priorities and to stress different skills early on. The early skills covered are based on developmental appropriateness and a well rounded student, instead of top down planning focused almost entirely on academics.

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Thank you Hunter for clarifying! I guess when I say rigorous, I am defining it according to how "hard" something is to do....not a good definition, kwim?

 

Thank u for the link to the sale. Will be on there today!

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I wanted to comment on the deeper issue here. Over the past couple of years I've noticed how much your ds10 and my dd10 sound similar, and that you and I have similarly, um, driven personalities, so this is coming from a place of deep internal reflection!!

 

In your OP, you seem to have put your finger on something really critical and important: that is, your relationship with your son, and how it has been strained/challenged by the potential mismatch between your styles, and between what you need for him (i.e., to be challenged, to be working up to his intellectual potential) and what he want for himself: to chill out, to be a "regular kid", to have time for his own projects and stuff. I think this insight is what I would focus on and hold on to if I were you. It rings really, really true to me, both based on my own experience and what I've seen you write about your son over the past few months. Whatever you decide about curriculum, hold onto this knowledge and make your decisions based on what is best for him, emotionally and psychologically as well as academically.

 

It's sooooo hard to let go of encouraging (pushing?) kids to meet their potential. It's hard to trust that what they want to do and are interested in is enough. Especially when you suspect that their preferences are driven by the desire to take the easy road! I feel this way all the time with my dd.

 

 

 

 

I have seen the same. I have posted to Halcyon in the past that her situation reminds me of things w/my oldest when he was in 5th grade. I learned the hard way w/him that children experience burn-out in the same way adults do and that simply b/c they are more than capable and can do something definitely does not translate into the reality that they should. My experiences w/my oldest totally altered how I have approached education with my younger kids. Know what??? My other kids have soared higher by NOT having the push "to."

 

Anyway, Halcyon, I actually think it is a very good idea and not crazy at all. Having an "in the box" plan will allow both of you to see what normal 6th grader workloads resemble and give both of you an opportunity to understand those expectations.

 

FWIW, I have only used 2 OM courses, both high school with my rising sr when he was in 9th. At his own pace, he finished the entire yr's worth of English credit in a semester. The World Geography was a better fit for him and he learned a lot from it and enjoyed the assignments even though he thought the text was dry as dust.

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I was going to put this as an ETA, but decided I should write is as a separate post since it might not be seen as an edit.

 

I am not so sure about your plan with your youngest ds. My experience is that there is a huge shift in expected written output between 3rd and 4th grades. I don't know about that specifically with OM, but I would expect it from any curriculum that is age/child development level appropriate.

 

I personally would not have an 8 yr old doing "required" written output of a 4th grader w/the exception of math unless it was something that was really self-led.

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I was going to put this as an ETA, but decided I should write is as a separate post since it might not be seen as an edit.

 

I am not so sure about your plan with your youngest ds. My experience is that there is a huge shift in expected written output between 3rd and 4th grades. I don't know about that specifically with OM, but I would expect it from any curriculum that is age/child development level appropriate.

 

I personally would not have an 8 yr old doing "required" written output of a 4th grader w/the exception of math unless it was something that was really self-led.

 

If she has a 3rd grader in OM 4th grade the written work shouldn't be overwhelming. That's why I dropped OM 4th. Because my ds was so far ahead of what it was expecting/teaching in the Language Arts area. It also seemed disjointed and inconsistent to me. The grammar was way below the level of what I would personally expect from a typical beginning 4th grade student, and yet the reading selections were good. The focus of writing is the Daily Journal and there is work on paragraphs. I do not at all like how spelling is addressed in OM.

 

The history/geography/and science activities were interesting. I just did not like the layout. It wasn't a very intuitive program for me to use.

 

If the idea is to have a very relaxed year, but to try out some interesting projects, OM could work. But the child would have to be willing to write daily. If going all in with OM only, I would keep a close eye to make sure previous skills learned aren't getting lost or rusty.

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I was going to put this as an ETA, but decided I should write is as a separate post since it might not be seen as an edit.

 

I am not so sure about your plan with your youngest ds. My experience is that there is a huge shift in expected written output between 3rd and 4th grades. I don't know about that specifically with OM, but I would expect it from any curriculum that is age/child development level appropriate.

 

I personally would not have an 8 yr old doing "required" written output of a 4th grader w/the exception of math unless it was something that was really self-led.

Thanks. YOunger is my "writer"--always writing a lot, but much prefers creative writing to summaries. I am hoping that OM 4 will fill that need. I am going to talk to them on the phone before I commit, though. His spelling is excellent, as is his grammar. But the output, as you mentioned, is what need to be aware of--he can write a LOT if he wants to and enjoys the story he is creating, but "obligatory" writing is more challenging.

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I've looked at OM since dd was 5, but never got it for various reasons. We'll be starting 6th grade in the fall and I could see that we needed to change something, so I was looking around and ended up at OM again. I managed to find a really inexpensive used set. (Such a good deal that I was worried that it didn't exist and they were taking my money lol) I'm pretty excited about it and am going that my girl enjoys it, too.

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If she has a 3rd grader in OM 4th grade the written work shouldn't be overwhelming. That's why I dropped OM 4th. Because my ds was so far ahead of what it was expecting/teaching in the Language Arts area. It also seemed disjointed and inconsistent to me. The grammar was way below the level of what I would personally expect from a typical beginning 4th grade student, and yet the reading selections were good. The focus of writing is the Daily Journal and there is work on paragraphs. I do not at all like how spelling is addressed in OM.

 

The history/geography/and science activities were interesting. I just did not like the layout. It wasn't a very intuitive program for me to use.

 

If the idea is to have a very relaxed year, but to try out some interesting projects, OM could work. But the child would have to be willing to write daily. If going all in with OM only, I would keep a close eye to make sure previous skills learned aren't getting lost or rusty.

Thank you. As I mentioned in the previous post, DS7 (almost 8! Sunday!) is way ahead in writing, grammar and spelling. In fact, we dropped spelling last year. We may continue with KISS. We would skip the spelling in OM in all likelihood. With math, we will likely continue with our hybrid of MM and CWP with RS games. We may use some of the OM stuff, it just depends. He doesn't need drill really.

 

Hmm. I wonder just how much of OM we'll be using with him. Definitely Science, History, Lit, the stories, the art. Not so much the math or spelling.

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You know, I am wondering the exact same thing about my 6th & 4th grade boys. My 6th grade son is high-strung and burned out. My 4th grade son is easy going, when I give him space to be. I've pushed and pushed and pushed and now we're all just cranky! I love the *idea* of a more hands-on, relaxed day with them. I love the idea of a central theme, with assignments all wrapped around, like a well-designed unit study. I love the idea of working with them instead of managing them, if that makes sense.

 

I bought a copy of OM 6th grade, but it's the same content we covered this year! Argh! I even bought a unit from Moving Beyond the Page, but the book was just...inappropriate.

 

And, for what it's worth, I think the big question is, do you think *you* would enjoy something like OM? If you do make the switch, I'd stick with your current math, only because jumping around in math usually creates problems for the student.

 

If you want to sell me OM6, let me know. I know that History will be review, as we just did Ancients this year. But that's okay. For math, we will be likely continuing with Dolciani, although I don't really know much about OM math.

 

ETA: Just looked at OM7 math, and he's covered most of it already. I think we'll stick with Dolciani Pre-A til December, when we're scheduled to finish, and then re-evaluate. I was thinking TabletClass Algebra for him.

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I think learning to knit is really really hard for a 1st grader. And I think the listening skills required of Waldorf 1st graders are really difficult. I think the form drawing is hard. I think multiplication and division are advanced skills, and really hard for some children. I don't know. I just don't think Waldorf is easier than classical. I just think it's different.

 

I'm tutoring adult students, and self-educating to fill in gaps created by an inferior education and too many seizures. So grade levels don't mean much to me. I study the general methods and remediate as needed. I don't use either a classical or Waldorf scope and sequence. I just teach what is right to teach at the time, using all the vintage and modern methods I have at my disposal.

 

But just in general, I don't think Waldorf is easier than classical, and I think a student switching from classical to Waldorf will often have as much catching up to do, as the other way around. I think classical to homeschool OM would be far easier than classical to a real Waldorf school, but I'm assuming there will still be difficulties.

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Ok, if it wasn't 12:22 here, I would write more.... I have been using OM3 and just did a detailed review and week in the life posts. I can't tell you about the older levels, but can answer general questions and about OM3- link in siggy- there is a giveaway too! Ill check back I'm the AM to see if there are any questions I can answer!

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Halcyon, today I decided that my boys will skip spelling next year. They are both fabulous spellers, and we're all tired of it. It has felt like overkill for some time now, but I have had difficulty in letting it go. I was inspired by you kicking some stuff to the curb. Take that, spelling! (kicks to the curb)

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I was going to put this as an ETA, but decided I should write is as a separate post since it might not be seen as an edit.

 

I am not so sure about your plan with your youngest ds. My experience is that there is a huge shift in expected written output between 3rd and 4th grades. I don't know about that specifically with OM, but I would expect it from any curriculum that is age/child development level appropriate.

 

I personally would not have an 8 yr old doing "required" written output of a 4th grader w/the exception of math unless it was something that was really self-led.

 

 

The writing expectation could be cut down, and may even be less than Halcyon is currently having him do. OM often gives options for a written or craft type of project, eg to write 4 pretend postcards from Stewart Little to his parents or to make a model of his birch bark canoe could be the sort of options--my guess is that younger ds can write a few short pretend post cards, or could enjoy the more crafty option, and that either might be less output than he is now doing.

 

But I would be concerned that an 8 year old may not be ready to do perspective drawing--which I am pretty sure is part of OM4--possibly with the bulk of the year's art devoted to various perspective drawing methods, and thus that much of the art part could be pitched at the wrong developmental level. I do not know what OM grade 3 art has, but usually in Waldorf it is much looser and flowing, often watercolor oriented or still crayon work, with a shift to things like perspective drawing for pre-adolescent, upper elementary developmental stage.

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I'm going to be homeschooling dd7 for the first time this year. I have definitely flirted with the idea of OM for her. I get the appeal, I totally do. I don't think I'm going to do it, because of the cost (an issue at the moment) and because I really do have everything on hand I need to teach 2nd grade . . . . but no doubt I will go drool over the website again after reading this thread!

 

I wanted to comment on the deeper issue here. Over the past couple of years I've noticed how much your ds10 and my dd10 sound similar, and that you and I have similarly, um, driven personalities, so this is coming from a place of deep internal reflection!!

 

In your OP, you seem to have put your finger on something really critical and important: that is, your relationship with your son, and how it has been strained/challenged by the potential mismatch between your styles, and between what you need for him (i.e., to be challenged, to be working up to his intellectual potential) and what he want for himself: to chill out, to be a "regular kid", to have time for his own projects and stuff. I think this insight is what I would focus on and hold on to if I were you. It rings really, really true to me, both based on my own experience and what I've seen you write about your son over the past few months. Whatever you decide about curriculum, hold onto this knowledge and make your decisions based on what is best for him, emotionally and psychologically as well as academically.

 

It's sooooo hard to let go of encouraging (pushing?) kids to meet their potential. It's hard to trust that what they want to do and are interested in is enough. Especially when you suspect that their preferences are driven by the desire to take the easy road! I feel this way all the time with my dd.

 

I really don't have any answers at all, I just wanted to say that your OP really resonated with me, and good for you for seeing this and thinking about how to move forward in the way that's best for your family. I've been reading two books that have really been speaking to me, and you might like them if you haven't read them already: One is Free Range Learning http://www.amazon.co...g/dp/193538709X and the other is Simplicity Parenting http://www.amazon.co...,stripbooks,288

 

 

Let us know what you decide and how it works for you! Off to drool over OM again . . . :drool5:

 

 

 

I think this is extremely important--esp. the bolded. I was glad that OP said her elder ds had looked at the samples for OM and liked them. I think that is an important factor to consider. OP has been looking at OM for a while, thinking maybe it would fit and help allow for some time of being kids. Plus at least one of the children has expressed interest. It may well be time to get it and see how it goes. Instead of thinking about it.

 

I am concerned though that OM4 may not be a good fit for the younger child and that he should be in OM3, either way with a different math program, but maybe you will get a better idea of that by talking with the OM advisors.

 

I do not see the issue with spelling btw, unlike math which tends to be at a low level, so far as I recall OM just calls for spelling to be words at ones own level, choosing a few (10?) words per week to work on...this could be good for seeing what is a reasonable amount, but the level would be whatever the 2 dc each are at.

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Okay, maybe if I tell you what younger is doing, people,could advise me as to whether OM 4 or OM 3 would be better. Te OM rep was very nice but could not really advise me, unfortunately.

 

Ds, turning 8 this Sunday. Enjoys reading: black beauty, stuart little, charlotte's web, phantom tollbooth, Calvin and Hobbes. Up until fairly recently, loved writing and wrote a ton on his own. Wrote a 20 page story (handwritten..and NEAT!) when he was 6, enjoys writing comics. Knows capitalization rules well but likes to ignore them. Grammar is great, as is spelling. Gets bored easily, very easily. With math, loves CWP, hates rote drill. Loves RS math games. Loves SOTW but writes "joke" narrations...like summarizing who Xerxes is, and then having him fall down a Redstone tunnel and get attacked by creepers. Sigh. Extremely verbal, better vocabulary than my rising 6th grader in all likelihood, and uses words like "ironic", "conceptual" and "eloquently"correctly. Enjoys Learning esoteric knowledge and inserting it into discussions and stories. Easily frustrated when challenged...doesnt seem to want to work too hard, but takes great pleasure in "being smart" and knowing the answers. Always has his own projects in the works, easily self-entertained. Loves cooking, knitting, sewing, designing dresses, drawing and crafts. Enjoys science experiments but dislikes being overly directed;prefers to take the lead but loves working with others, very generous in praising others and recognizing others achievements. Likes languages, particulalry those with different lettering like Greek and Arabic.

 

Okay, so there's my 7 yr old in a nutshell.

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The writing expectation could be cut down, and may even be less than Halcyon is currently having him do. OM often gives options for a written or craft type of project, eg to write 4 pretend postcards from Stewart Little to his parents or to make a model of his birch bark canoe could be the sort of options--my guess is that younger ds can write a few short pretend post cards, or could enjoy the more crafty option, and that either might be less output than he is now doing.

 

But I would be concerned that an 8 year old may not be ready to do perspective drawing--which I am pretty sure is part of OM4--possibly with the bulk of the year's art devoted to various perspective drawing methods, and thus that much of the art part could be pitched at the wrong developmental level. I do not know what OM grade 3 art has, but usually in Waldorf it is much looser and flowing, often watercolor oriented or still crayon work, with a shift to things like perspective drawing for pre-adolescent, upper elementary developmental stage.

 

Interesting about perspective drawing. DH is an artist, and has worked with the kids, informally, forever. I can ask him what he thinks. Thank you.

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Okay, maybe if I tell you what younger is doing, people,could advise me as to whether OM 4 or OM 3 would be better. Te OM rep was very nice but could not really advise me, unfortunately.

 

Ds, turning 8 this Sunday. Enjoys reading: black beauty, stuart little, charlotte's web, phantom tollbooth, Calvin and Hobbes. Up until fairly recently, loved writing and wrote a ton on his own. Wrote a 20 page story (handwritten..and NEAT!) when he was 6, enjoys writing comics. Knows capitalization rules well but likes to ignore them. Grammar is great, as is spelling. Gets bored easily, very easily. With math, loves CWP, hates rote drill. Loves RS math games. Loves SOTW but writes "joke" narrations...like summarizing who Xerxes is, and then having him fall down a Redstone tunnel and get attacked by creepers. Sigh. Extremely verbal, better vocabulary than my rising 6th grader in all likelihood, and uses words like "ironic", "conceptual" and "eloquently"correctly. Enjoys Learning esoteric knowledge and inserting it into discussions and stories. Easily frustrated when challenged...doesnt seem to want to work too hard, but takes great pleasure in "being smart" and knowing the answers. Always has his own projects in the works, easily self-entertained. Loves cooking, knitting, sewing, designing dresses, drawing and crafts. Enjoys science experiments but dislikes being overly directed;prefers to take the lead but loves working with others, very generous in praising others and recognizing others achievements. Likes languages, particulalry those with different lettering like Greek and Arabic.

 

Okay, so there's my 7 yr old in a nutshell.

 

 

He sounds delightful! Can I borrow him? Okay, DH being an artist puts in an interesting twist b/c the art aspect will be more easy to modify. How about OM4, and let DH give him easier art if needed--shift the lessons somehow to fit his 8 year old self. Or maybe it won't be needed. And how about just CWP for math at whatever is right level, his own music (Waldorf recorder music is a pet peeve of mine :) and also causes our dog great distress) whatever that is, if any, and keep everything else straight OM4 and see if it relaxes you all? Maybe let Latin/Greek/Arabic or whatever language go unless he asks for it in the interests of your relationship and time constraints, and then if he does ask for it let his interest drive that.

 

That is, don't load a lot of other subjects or math on top of the OM. Let it be a very relaxed year with plenty of time to go do the nature study, whatever art he does do, and so on.

 

If OM seems great but he seems to need less advanced, then you will have the OM4 ready for the following year. I do not think it would be so far off as to seem totally wrong while OM3 would have seemed perfect. Nature study is nature study. Plus the OM4 reading level seems right for him.

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He sounds delightful! Can I borrow him? Okay, DH being an artist puts in an interesting twist b/c the art aspect will be more easy to modify. How about OM4, and let DH give him easier art if needed--shift the lessons somehow to fit his 8 year old self. Or maybe it won't be needed. And how about just CWP for math at whatever is right level, his own music (Waldorf recorder music is a pet peeve of mine :) and also causes our dog great distress) whatever that is, if any, and keep everything else straight OM4 and see if it relaxes you all? Maybe let Latin/Greek/Arabic or whatever language go unless he asks for it in the interests of your relationship and time constraints, and then if he does ask for it let his interest drive that.

 

That is, don't load a lot of other subjects or math on top of the OM. Let it be a very relaxed year with plenty of time to go do the nature study, whatever art he does do, and so on.

 

You are awesome, and just reading this makes me smile. Keep it simple, right? With younger, I definitely won't overload him. I think sticking with CWP is a good idea. DH insists we keep up in latin, but does not care if the pace is super slow. Also, younger will be starting musical theatre next year and music theory classes, so no recorder here :)

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Hummm..... I haven't seen 4. The independent readers for OM3 are classic stories- like Winnie the pooh and Charlottes web. You don't DO anything with them other than read them. My kiddo is going through them faster, so we add in our own lit selections on top of those.

OM3 is deceptive- on first glance I thought maybe it was too light or too easy, but the more time I spent with it, the more I noticed the subtleties. It is more of a framework that is easily adapted to his level, which makes it great for a kid like you described. For example, for language arts, you'll be reading classic folk tales, but they aren't short or uncomplicated- we're talking 2-4 page long detailed stories. He'll then get to sit on it, and think about it over night, and the next day, he'll retell it to you, write a summary (however long/detailed you want to make it) and illustrate it. It gives him room to be creative, and you room to "tweak" it to him. The science and history are much of the same. Lots of stories, lots of drawing, lots of hands on projects.

I would think 3 would be the right fit, knowing you may need to supplement the math for level if he already knows his times tables, and knowing you may need to add in extra reading to the books once he finishes them.

I wish I could invite you over to see my copy! I was the anti-boxed curriculum gal since we started homeschooling.... but Oak Meadow isn't what I would call a "box". It's a framework and everything I need, but it gives me room and doesn't take forever to get done. Some weeks, when I am tired and busy, all we do is OM, and I know I am getting my kiddo a solid education, but other weeks, I still have time to do unit studies, and we have time to add in Latin, and we just have TIME. It's efficient, it's all there for me, and it's not taking over my life. I wish I had tried it sooner, and I'll be sticking with it (LOL bearing in mind that my eclectic self just HAS to do unit studies on top of it for FUN)

Let me know if there is anything else I can answer for you!

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OM 4 has quite a bit of daily writing, and the science sounds like it would appeal to your son. I love The Private Eye. The history (social studies) section is quite a bit of independent research. Really those two sections resembled unit studies to me. Those were the two parts I found more interesting. I just needed more structure and guidance then OM provided. It is also imo really parent intensive. I would worry about the language arts sections (grammar especially) boring your son if he's easily bored.

 

The art and handicrafts areas seem like they would appeal to your ds. I agree with pp, if a recorder isn't your thing do something else. I do enjoy the arts and crafts elements of OM.

 

I have not seen OM math materials.

 

If a relaxed and projects based year is what you're looking for, go ahead and give it a try.

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Okay, so let's just say I am going to do this. What do I need to buy? Here's what I am thinking: the Syllabus for each grade, Basic Life Science for 6th, Indian Tales for 4th. The rest of the books I either have or will buy used on Amazon. I am going to pass on the Teacher's Manuals to save money.

 

As for the crafts, I have to decide whether to buy them now, or piecemeal as I need them (and as I realize what we do and do not already own).

 

DH Is already having a heart attack at the cost, although TBH it isn't more than I spend each year, but I never do it all at once, kwim?

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Okay, maybe if I tell you what younger is doing, people,could advise me as to whether OM 4 or OM 3 would be better. Te OM rep was very nice but could not really advise me, unfortunately.

 

Ds, turning 8 this Sunday. Enjoys reading: black beauty, stuart little, charlotte's web, phantom tollbooth, Calvin and Hobbes. Up until fairly recently, loved writing and wrote a ton on his own. Wrote a 20 page story (handwritten..and NEAT!) when he was 6, enjoys writing comics. Knows capitalization rules well but likes to ignore them. Grammar is great, as is spelling. Gets bored easily, very easily. With math, loves CWP, hates rote drill. Loves RS math games. Loves SOTW but writes "joke" narrations...like summarizing who Xerxes is, and then having him fall down a Redstone tunnel and get attacked by creepers. Sigh. Extremely verbal, better vocabulary than my rising 6th grader in all likelihood, and uses words like "ironic", "conceptual" and "eloquently"correctly. Enjoys Learning esoteric knowledge and inserting it into discussions and stories. Easily frustrated when challenged...doesnt seem to want to work too hard, but takes great pleasure in "being smart" and knowing the answers. Always has his own projects in the works, easily self-entertained. Loves cooking, knitting, sewing, designing dresses, drawing and crafts. Enjoys science experiments but dislikes being overly directed;prefers to take the lead but loves working with others, very generous in praising others and recognizing others achievements. Likes languages, particulalry those with different lettering like Greek and Arabic.

 

Okay, so there's my 7 yr old in a nutshell.

 

 

So you're going to give a kid like this a boxed curriculum? Nutso! :D

 

You ask us to tell you you're crazy, consider yourself indulged ;)

 

Bill

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So you're going to give a kid like this a boxed curriculum? Nutso! :D

 

You ask us to tell you you're crazy, consider yourself indulged ;)

 

Bill

 

 

 

HA! I was hoping you wouldn't see this thread, Bill ;)

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I'm sure :lol:

 

And I tried so hard not to post, but it went against my nature :D

 

What are you thinking???

 

Bill

 

 

 

I just can't make this kid happy, kwim? He loves handicrafts, history and stories, so that's what we're going to mostly use from OM. And the science. We'll throw in experiments, of course, and we'll continue our own math path: BA, CWP, MM...the medley. To be honest, I don't think it will be THAT different from what we're doing with him right now, which is pretty eclectic already. I am just hoping for more crafts and art, and a more "holistic" approach to his learning, one that includes not only the intellect but the emotional and the physical. Older is really doing more "classical" so it will be more of a change for him, I think. But it's one he needs right now. Either way, if they don't work, the resale value is great.

 

Also, I am working a lot more--it's draining to "do it all" LOL!!!

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i am going with a boxed curriculum next year as well. i have no idea if we'll love it or hate it, but it made planning very easy & i needed that. my daughter is going to public middle school next year & i'll be using MFW ECC next year with my son. i'm looking forward to it.

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I just can't make this kid happy, kwim? He loves handicrafts, history and stories, so that's what we're going to mostly use from OM. And the science. We'll throw in experiments, of course, and we'll continue our own math path: BA, CWP, MM...the medley. To be honest, I don't think it will be THAT different from what we're doing with him right now, which is pretty eclectic already. I am just hoping for more crafts and art, and a more "holistic" approach to his learning, one that includes not only the intellect but the emotional and the physical. Older is really doing more "classical" so it will be more of a change for him, I think. But it's one he needs right now. Either way, if they don't work, the resale value is great.

 

Also, I am working a lot more--it's draining to "do it all" LOL!!!

 

So what is it that you'd be gaining from OM? Craft projects? I'm not sure I get it.

 

Just playing Devil's Advocate* here.

 

Bill (*who is neither in league with—nor believes in the existence of—the Dark Lord :D)

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I think OM will keep me on track with regards to their _whole_ development. I tend to err on the side of academic rigor, sometimes to their detriment. I think OM will break me out of that by constantly reminding me to focus on the beauty of learning and childhood.

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I think OM will keep me on track with regards to their _whole_ development. I tend to err on the side of academic rigor, sometimes to their detriment. I think OM will break me out of that by constantly reminding me to focus on the beauty of learning and childhood.

 

What does that mean "whole development"?

 

I mean in terms of actual "on-the-ground" terms. How does a boxed curriculum create a focus on "beauty"?

 

Bill

 

 

 

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I don't know if it will, Bill. But I can't, seemingly, do it on my own.

 

Well, I wish you all the best in finding what you feel you're lacking.

 

From my great remove it seems like you've been doing a pretty awesome job so far!

 

I hope you give yourself credit :)

 

Bill

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Okay, so let's just say I am going to do this. What do I need to buy? Here's what I am thinking: the Syllabus for each grade, Basic Life Science for 6th, Indian Tales for 4th. The rest of the books I either have or will buy used on Amazon. I am going to pass on the Teacher's Manuals to save money.

 

As for the crafts, I have to decide whether to buy them now, or piecemeal as I need them (and as I realize what we do and do not already own).

 

DH Is already having a heart attack at the cost, although TBH it isn't more than I spend each year, but I never do it all at once, kwim?

 

 

 

Having only looked at samples, I cannot answer, but that sounds pretty good and gave me a couple of other thoughts--when I write about a year or grade below I mean it to apply to typical Waldorf, not OM.

 

1st though just a note to make sure you are looking at curriculum prices, not enrollment prices, unless you want to have them doing OM long distance with a teacher there.

 

Not sure what "Indian Tales" are, but one of the highlights of 2nd(?) was Jataka tales that the Buddha was supposed to have told--which can also be gotten from libraries and Amazon. That and Native American tales gave the basis for much of the watercolor work that year (for 3rd traditionally it is Old Testament and Ancient Civilizations). I keep going back to thinking that for holistic development reasons, 8yo should be doing watercolor even if he is capable of doing perspective drawing--that required art should be kept soft and colorful and not too detailed. The more detail and hard line work is supposed to come with the "9 year change" --and that if you are trying to give him a holistic experience to give him that part.

 

I personally would not be inclined to get the crafts package, my guess is that your boys can be creative about figuring out what to use (and always remember that brown paper bags do well when crushed to simulate bark, leather, etc.). The process of figuring out how to go about making a Stuart Little canoe, and what to use, can be more valuable than having a better finished result based on things an adult hands you. One year when my ds was in school, their project was a wood sword--it was simple 2 pieces in all and 2 nails, with a main piece being blade and handle, and another cross piece for the between the handle and blade point, older kids helped younger ones, and they got a lot out of it. The next year they supposedly "made" wheeled carts, but actually the adults had to get the wheels for them and had to help them with all the sawing because it was more than just two pieces of wood where fit did not much matter as for the swords, so it was not something the kids could do themselves, and in the end the adults (teachers and parent volunteers) had really made the carts other than a bit of sanding and final painting. It was not, IMO, a useful growing experience for the children, nor did they enjoy them like they had the simple swords. So both for your ease of not being the one who actually does the doing of the arts and crafts, and also for the boys' own learning, I suggest you let them figure it out from what is on hand. In general, in fact, I suggest you step back a lot and let them take the lead in the OM adventure. I think both OM4 and OM6 are already written to the child rather than to the parent. eg "ask you teacher to help you ____" rather than "have your child ____"

 

OTOH I do think having some high quality art materials if you do not already have them (though you probably do) are worthwhile.

 

The crowning high point for many for the lower school Waldorf years in 3rd at age 8 usually, was making a significant physical structure (with lots of adult help). If you need to build a gazebo or garden or pool shed or some such thing, this could be a good year.

 

A particular 6th grade high point was a class trip that usually went for more than a single overnight, if anything comes up to fit that like a scout adventure, you might keep that in mind. Ironically, it was the 6th-ers who did the perspective drawing work.

 

Good Luck, and if you do this I hope you will report on the experience!

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Having lived with a bunch of highly/profoundly gifted males and also knowing their equally gifted friends, I've noticed a real need for them to experience developmentally appropriate holistic experiences, and maybe actually MORE of a need for them.

 

Pen's description of watercolor for 3rd, and perspective for 4th sounds important to consider.

 

I never looked too much at OM, and instead looked more strongly at more traditional Waldorf curriculums. I think there is so much wisdom in almost 100 years of practice. The OM changes sometimes sound appropriate to adjust to the needs of some families, but other times...they sound sad to me. Childhood is so short and so precious and so important. I think some of Waldorf philosophy is outdated and incorrect, but some of it is waaaaaaay way way ahead of general practice.

 

I understand the push to teach perspective; it looks so advanced. But when talked about in context of developmental appropriateness, watercolor sounds SO better for the average gifted 8 year olds.

 

My gifted 8 year old used to collect the dirty tinfoil leftover from his peer's lunches, to model with. I wish I'd know to give him some beeswax. I think he really needed it, despite how advanced he was in other areas. It certainly would have been more hygienic at least. :lol:

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Ha! LOL. Well, I am going to order from OM directly, so I can exchange OM4 for OM3 if need be, or keep OM4 for next year. I also know that DS8 will appreciate the tone of OM4 as it speaks TO the child, and doesn't require me as the intermediary. He has been working independently for a year now, and I think would be very annoyed if I inserted myself into the lessons without his direct request LOL.

 

The beeswax will be much loved here, I know.

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Having lived with a bunch of highly/profoundly gifted males and also knowing their equally gifted friends, I've noticed a real need for them to experience developmentally appropriate holistic experiences, and maybe actually MORE of a need for them.

 

Pen's description of watercolor for 3rd, and perspective for 4th sounds important to consider.

 

I never looked too much at OM, and instead looked more strongly at more traditional Waldorf curriculums. I think there is so much wisdom in almost 100 years of practice. The OM changes sometimes sound appropriate to adjust to the needs of some families, but other times...they sound sad to me. Childhood is so short and so precious and so important. I think some of Waldorf philosophy is outdated and incorrect, but some of it is waaaaaaay way way ahead of general practice.

 

I understand the push to teach perspective; it looks so advanced. But when talked about in context of developmental appropriateness, watercolor sounds SO better for the average gifted 8 year olds.

 

My gifted 8 year old used to collect the dirty tinfoil leftover from his peer's lunches, to model with. I wish I'd know to give him some beeswax. I think he really needed it, despite how advanced he was in other areas. It certainly would have been more hygienic at least. :lol:

 

 

Another thought on the art is that the older boy seems somewhere between typical Waldorf grade 5 and 6 age (?), 5th typically would have more detailed drawing work, but usually as a big part of nature study and science with (often stunning) botanical pictures done that year, almost always with color. They continue to do watercolor through all the years, by the way. 5th and 6th typically also have claywork (regular clay such as might be used on a potters wheel, but a soft pliable one, not something like porcelain that is hard to work with) that may be of things from nature (same often for 3rd and 4th), like, say, a rock with 2 squirrels chasing each other, or maybe a whale coming up from waves. Or (as also with the watercolors) may depict something from literature or other lessons, or may just be work with the hands to do rounding of balls of clay which makes for a good centering feeling physically and emotionally to do it.

 

Even if older son can do perspective work and this point, doing some of the botanical and other type work typical of 5th grade, and even some of the things the younger children would do, might be excellent for him, just as watercolor and beeswax might be good for younger. Good for their holistic development, and bringing in the beauty you seek.

 

 

Here is a link to where there is some Waldorf perspective drawing work--in this case for grade 7--if you click on the book that shows the chessboard on the front you can see more inside. The 6th grade perspective work I saw was not this intellectual or hard lined. It included things like some watercolor with the idea that colors tend to wash out and lighten in the far distance, images get less clear in the far distance, that an object superimposed on another object will be understood as closer to the viewer, etc. I recall that one class had done a walkway with a series of arches that appeared to recede into the distance as more similar to the chessboard in detail and rigourousness.

 

My ds who is a similar age to your older ds will be doing botanical drawing and nature journal this next year (or at least that is the plan) btw. Incidentally, for what it is worth, from a holistic development pov, as I learned it, one tries to get the child or adult doing the picture to well develop all parts of the plant in some pictures, roots, stem, leaves, and flower... as being the whole self with all parts developing and not say strong leaf system but no solid stem, etc. There is a realistic aspect as drawn from nature, and sometimes following a single plant from its beginning to its endings (such as a dandelion typically), but sometimes there is also the plant as stand in for the self. I think that may be true for the rounded clay forms too--one is in part making a rounded self without harsh jags and holes, so to speak.

 

Here are some typical Waldorf Botany art grade 5, and here some typical Waldorf grade 6 art examples. Grade 4 examples. Grade 3 examples.

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What does that mean "whole development"?

 

I mean in terms of actual "on-the-ground" terms. How does a boxed curriculum create a focus on "beauty"?

 

Bill

 

It will tell the kids to do things like go out and look closely at nature, to really observe closely and then to _____ (depends on grade and subject).

 

It will give them projects that are not necessarily "academic."

 

By the way, Halcyon, did you put somewhere that dh insists on not letting Latin slide for a bit? Why? Did he take a lot of Latin and feel it helped him a great deal in life? If so, how? Or does he wish had done so? Or? Or you and Latin experience?

 

Does anyone on their death bed look back and think, "if only I had spent one more year taking Latin..."?

 

I took 2 years of Latin, and think it was helpful, but I cannot say I wish I had had more.

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Whole Development/Whole Child - Means mind, body & soul, not just the mind (academics). Holistic Curricula concentrates on the development of the whole child, which is why it is usually associated quite closely with the childs age, to match their current developmental stage/needs. Oak Meadow pretty much pulled the crafts and ideas from this, and left the rest. So it will tell you to knit, but not *why* its important for the child at that age, it will also apparently give advice on putting your child into a year that is above his developmental stage, which waldorf & holistic places would not, as its about the whole child, not just the academics.

 

Sorry if that didn't make sense, I literally just rolled out of bed, my brains not functional yet :p

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I haven't read the other posts, but you're not crazy! We switching to Oak Meadow next year too. (Or, I should say, we're giving it a try.) :) It certainly looks less rigorous but we're moving soon and have a crazy year ahead of us. I needed something "boxed" but not overkill. I can always supplement, but I would have felt guilty leaving parts of a more rigorous curriculum undone. (IOW, it's easier for me to add to something than to leave boxes unchecked. ;) )

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Darn you, Halcyon!!!!!!!!!! http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/tongue_smilie.gif

 

Oh, for heavens sake. I have requested an Oak Meadow catalog every year for at least three years. Always looked at it, but always thought it didn't look like...enough. But, still, there was always a yearning there. I have always been so very attracted to it. I mean, c'mon! A secular, heart-of-the-child focused, super easy to use, put-together-by-someone-else (!!! http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/lol.gif) curriculum? Hello! I am super type-A but have always leaned toward unschooly. (I mean, what?!) I let type A take over though...although I have repeatedly tried to unschool in a type-A way. I am sure that sounds just about as mentally and spiritually conflicting as it is. LOL!! Like your kids, I think mine could benefit if I was a bit more type B in life. And yet, I fight that side of myself all the time. It is wearying.

 

So here comes this thread, making me look at the samples again. Of course. And feeling the same thing again...just with more attraction this time, probably because I'm about where Element is...

 

I haven't read the other posts, but you're not crazy! We switching to Oak Meadow next year too. (Or, I should say, we're giving it a try.) http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/smile.gif It certainly looks less rigorous but we're moving soon and have a crazy year ahead of us. I needed something "boxed" but not overkill. I can always supplement, but I would have felt guilty leaving parts of a more rigorous curriculum undone. (IOW, it's easier for me to add to something than to leave boxes unchecked. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/wink.gif )

Yes, moving (again) in the second half of this school year. Crazy year ahead of us. Yes. And I am totally awesome at supplementing stuff (if I do say so myself http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/wink.gif It's a gift. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/tongue_smilie.gif). So there I go, looking wistfully again. Just looking, mind you. I know darn well that I'm just going to dismiss it again, as usual.

 

Then, bam. I recall that a very good friend (who is philosophically simpatico) purchased OM4 last year, thinking at the time that she was going to pull one of her kids to homeschool. So I asked her about it, telling her the curriculum was very attractive to me but that the samples left me wondering about the whole. She kind of filled me in, and then said magical words. At the beginning of the year, the kids pick a tree and follow it through the year, doing various activities that create a sense of time and place, looking at the bigger picture. OM is supposed to be really good at integrating subjects, which I believe in to the nth power. Frankly, I work my rear off to bring subjects together here. And I enjoy it. But I would also enjoy someone else's rear getting worked off and me just enjoying the product of all that work. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/lol.gif So I get to thinking about the tree.

 

Look at this post of mine from 4 years ago, from a thread about picking homeschool names...

 

Our homeschool name is Alte Veste Academy. I chose it because the name perfectly encapsulates my main reasons for homeschooling and my philosophy of education.

 

My dad was in the Army and I spent most of my childhood in Germany. In the 6th grade (in a Department of Defense school in Furth, near Nurnberg), I had the best teacher in all my life. In those days, we were still in one class with one teacher all day long. He was big into nature study and frequently took us on day hikes to Alte Veste, a nearby natural area. We each picked a tree at the beginning of the school year, measured it, studied it through the seasons, etc. We would take regular trips and stay all day on that hill, doing all our studies and eating lunch out in nature. That teacher is in the top 5 of my list of reasons for homeschooling. The fact that I know my kids would never have an experience like that in public school was one of the first reasons I began to consider keeping my kids at home. I realized that I was the only one who could ensure that they get that kind of experience.

 

He was a great teacher in so many other ways also. He always challenged us yet we always were interested and having fun. Also, we didn't get grades. Each of us was given a weekly assignment sheet on Monday and we had until Friday to accomplish everything on it. We were given a great deal of freedom but a great deal was expected of us at the same time. It was a wonderful year.

 

Incidentally, Alte Veste was a a major battle site of the 100 Years War. (http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Alte_Veste) and translates to Old Fortress, I believe. I don't remember knowing that at the time but it's pretty cool to know now!

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Hey I don't blame you if you go with something boxed. I'm going back to Sonlight this year after a year away and I'm so happy about my decision. Glorious IG, notes, schedules, almost no planning! Weeee!! After using a mish-mash this year I was pretty happy to get that box. There is something to be said for preserving our sanity.

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Hmm, I'm another doubting that OM is going to work for you guys. Instead of a boxed curriculum, could you put that money towards boxed activities instead? Science kits, quality art supplies, hands-on history, K'nex or similar . . . just various things that are little to no prep for you, that they can go wild with? It would seem to suit them so much more.

 

For academics, copy work each day, a book basket they can choose from, math of course, watch videos and read books together for ease of discussion, possibly not so much change your approach as trim it down.

 

I would also put a focus on field trips: going to the art museum, seeing live performances, checking out local attractions and local lore.

 

With kids who love to dive into things, explore, and create, it is almost always better, imo, to give them the space, time, and supplies to do so. Assignments via curriculum can be limiting for them, and frustrating for you (when they don't want to put much effort into it, even though they 'love that stuff.')

 

It sounds like you are comfortable with scaled-back academics for the year, so that is exactly what I would do: instead of switching to different academics, which may well take no less time or effort, i would just scale way back, and give them more time to pursue their interests.

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I only skimmed the other responses, but we used OM 6 and OM 4 this past year. I had debated it for years before purchase, but finally decided to jump in. It was great at first but in the end it bombed.

 

My 4th grader had a lot of frustration with the daily journal assignments in OM4. He doesn't enjoy writing in any sort of creative way so a lot of the assignments caused us grief and had to be modified. The creative projects in both levels were great, but ultimately too much stress for me. I felt like someone was always saying something like "Hey I need an organic tomato and a dry lima bean or I can't do science!!". For OM4 we were supposed to construct a Native American village, using natural materials only a few weeks after we were told to construct a landscape and populate it with clay creatures native to our area. For a parent who enjoys helping with that sort of thing, or a child that is very self-directed, it would work. For me, it just caused guilt and a lot of time.

 

OM6 had a lot of projects that my normally crafty daughter just didn't want to do. Many of the creative ideas for that level were just in list form with no directions. Thing like "paint a picture in the style of x". There was a ton of writing, much of which we ignored because it felt like way too much. The topic choices were not popular and I had to modify them. Also, I felt like she was constantly being told to "look up information about x at the library"'. After I paid all that money, I would have expected more of the information to be there-not at the library!

 

The biggest thing with it though was the lack of reading. We used Sonlight before that and are back at Sonlight now and my kids are happier. Most of OM's reading is in the syllabus and my kids really prefer a kind of "curl up on the couch and read" sort of education.

 

Anyway. Despite all this, I do think it is worth trying if you are drawn to it! I have friends that love it and use it each year. Just wanted to share our experience with it.

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Hmm, I'm another doubting that OM is going to work for you guys. Instead of a boxed curriculum, could you put that money towards boxed activities instead? Science kits, quality art supplies, hands-on history, K'nex or similar . . . just various things that are little to no prep for you, that they can go wild with? It would seem to suit them so much more.

For academics, copy work each day, a book basket they can choose from, math of course, watch videos and read books together for ease of discussion, possibly not so much change your approach as trim it down.

I would also put a focus on field trips: going to the art museum, seeing live performances, checking out local attractions and local lore.

With kids who love to dive into things, explore, and create, it is almost always better, imo, to give them the space, time, and supplies to do so. Assignments via curriculum can be limiting for them, and frustrating for you (when they don't want to put much effort into it, even though they 'love that stuff.')

It sounds like you are comfortable with scaled-back academics for the year, so that is exactly what I would do: instead of switching to different academics, which may well take no less time or effort, i would just scale way back, and give them more time to pursue their interests.

Speaking only for myself, and responding because I think this is a valuable discussion for us Type A folks, I absolutely know beyond a shadow of a doubt that what you describe is ideal. This is the way my kids lead their lives outside of school. It's how they tend. The problem is that I sometimes struggle to find this middle ground during school hours. (This would be my own fault. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/tongue_smilie.gif)

In the past I erred on the side of letting things go too far into unschooly ways (with negative consequences for the kids' attitudes). I corrected, and I truly don't even think I overcorrected. The kids enjoy school the way we do it now. We are going along just fine, but it is a lot of work for me. I don't know how to say this just right because of course it is work for me; it should be work for me. It's my job! http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/wink.gif What I mean to say, I guess, is that I get too much inside my own head sometimes. I don't overwhelm the kids (yay me! LOL), but I do frequently overwhelm myself--I over think, over plan, just plain over stress out. I like to think that the kids are oblivious to it, and I'm sure they don't know that so often I'm too busy or too cranky or too "in my own head" because of school but, in the end, that's completely irrelevant. The fact is, I could be more present, more joyous, more relaxed, just...more. I like the idea of following a (really very nice) plan. I'm not even burned out, just craving some (totally wrong word but whatever) disengagement with the planning and more engagement with the doing. I just can't help but think things should be more like you describe them, more like I used to do them, but I need an anchor or we drift. For me, a middle-of-the-road curriculum (not crazy rigorous but, yes, something scheduled out with the fun stuff already added in) to provide a path is like a safety blanket.

 

I only skimmed the other responses, but we used OM 6 and OM 4 this past year. I had debated it for years before purchase, but finally decided to jump in. It was great at first but in the end it bombed.

My 4th grader had a lot of frustration with the daily journal assignments in OM4. He doesn't enjoy writing in any sort of creative way so a lot of the assignments caused us grief and had to be modified. The creative projects in both levels were great, but ultimately too much stress for me. I felt like someone was always saying something like "Hey I need an organic tomato and a dry lima bean or I can't do science!!". For OM4 we were supposed to construct a Native American village, using natural materials only a few weeks after we were told to construct a landscape and populate it with clay creatures native to our area. For a parent who enjoys helping with that sort of thing, or a child that is very self-directed, it would work. For me, it just caused guilt and a lot of time.

OM6 had a lot of projects that my normally crafty daughter just didn't want to do. Many of the creative ideas for that level were just in list form with no directions. Thing like "paint a picture in the style of x". There was a ton of writing, much of which we ignored because it felt like way too much. The topic choices were not popular and I had to modify them. Also, I felt like she was constantly being told to "look up information about x at the library"'. After I paid all that money, I would have expected more of the information to be there-not at the library!

The biggest thing with it though was the lack of reading. We used Sonlight before that and are back at Sonlight now and my kids are happier. Most of OM's reading is in the syllabus and my kids really prefer a kind of "curl up on the couch and read" sort of education.

Anyway. Despite all this, I do think it is worth trying if you are drawn to it! I have friends that love it and use it each year. Just wanted to share our experience with it.

I think if Sonlight and OM got married and had a secular baby, it would be perfect. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/lol.gif

 

I get the $ thing (totally!) about the information in the curriculum being lacking, but in reading through all the samples, that actually brought me some relief. For where I am in my HSing journey, I like the idea of the kids choosing their own books about a topic while staying anchored to the plan. In a recent thread, I believe Rose (Chrysalis Academy) posted about the ultimate goal of teaching kids to access information and self-teach. I agree and that is stuck in my mind. Paired with my own recent thoughts about increasing independence for my oldest DS, I am inclined to see scouting out and culling resources as a positive attribute of the curriculum. I imagine coming from Sonlight, it would be a tough transition to move to a curriculum that provides such light reading. Thankfully, that is the easiest thing for me to add here. I don't overbuy curriculum but I have a book problem for sure. http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/lol.gif The supply thing used to frustrate me a lot. Then I started reading/noting/pre-purchasing all necessary supplies in the summer so that we had everything at the ready when it was needed.

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I think if Sonlight and OM got married and had a secular baby, it would be perfect. :lol:

 

Hysterical! :lol: Except I wouldn't mind a Christian baby. :D

 

I've not ever looked at OM, but I confess that this thread made me look. I think it was all the talk about drawing trees and stuff. ;)

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Speaking only for myself, and responding because I think this is a valuable discussion for us Type A folks, I absolutely know beyond a shadow of a doubt that what you describe is ideal. This is the way my kids lead their lives outside of school. It's how they tend. The problem is that I sometimes struggle to find this middle ground during school hours. (This would be my own fault. :tongue_smilie:)

 

In the past I erred on the side of letting things go too far into unschooly ways (with negative consequences for the kids' attitudes). I corrected, and I truly don't even think I overcorrected. The kids enjoy school the way we do it now. We are going along just fine, but it is a lot of work for me. I don't know how to say this just right because of course it is work for me; it should be work for me. It's my job! ;) What I mean to say, I guess, is that I get too much inside my own head sometimes. I don't overwhelm the kids (yay me! LOL),

 

But you see, I do! :huh:

 

but I do frequently overwhelm myself--I over think, over plan, just plain over stress out. I like to think that the kids are oblivious to it, and I'm sure they don't know that so often I'm too busy or too cranky or too "in my own head" because of school but, in the end, that's completely irrelevant. The fact is, I could be more present, more joyous, more relaxed, just...more. I like the idea of following a (really very nice) plan. I'm not even burned out, just craving some (totally wrong word but whatever) disengagement with the planning and more engagement with the doing. I just can't help but think things should be more like you describe them, more like I used to do them, but I need an anchor or we drift. For me, a middle-of-the-road curriculum (not crazy rigorous but, yes, something scheduled out with the fun stuff already added in) to provide a path is like a safety blanket.

 

Were we separated at birth??? Seriously-I need a guide to a more relaxed approach! I need more doing, less thinking, too. Seriously. And we drift too----to more rigorous. I need a guide to bring me back to the center again, gently.

 

 

I think if Sonlight and OM got married and had a secular baby, it would be perfect. :lol:

 

 

Oh I think this ALL the time. And not K12, which is too computer-y and way too much paperwork.

 

I get the $ thing (totally!) about the information in the curriculum being lacking, but in reading through all the samples, that actually brought me some relief. For where I am in my HSing journey, I like the idea of the kids choosing their own books about a topic while staying anchored to the plan. In a recent thread, I believe Rose (Chrysalis Academy) posted about the ultimate goal of teaching kids to access information and self-teach. I agree and that is stuck in my mind. Paired with my own recent thoughts about increasing independence for my oldest DS, I am inclined to see scouting out and culling resources as a positive attribute of the curriculum. I imagine coming from Sonlight, it would be a tough transition to move to a curriculum that provides such light reading. Thankfully, that is the easiest thing for me to add here. I don't overbuy curriculum but I have a book problem for sure. :lol: The supply thing used to frustrate me a lot. Then I started reading/noting/pre-purchasing all necessary supplies in the summer so that we had everything at the ready when it was needed.

 

 

I am with you here. I have no problem with a more bare guide, as opposed to one that says "read page 113-114 and fill out page 12 in your workbook. Then look at the map of Egypt on page 43 of your World Map Book and color in the Nile grey." That sort of thing drives me crazy. I much prefer "get a book on the subject" because it allows more freedom to approach the topic as we prefer, and to go deeper if we want or not. By NOT having specific instructions or readings, it allows us to add on if we want (a lapbook, a documentary, whatever...).....or not.

 

I have always been a big fan of "spines": books, texts, curriculums that serve as a GUIDE to what to study, to which we add on things. I do think the focus on crafts and nature will be hard for me, because I value "output" and "concrete evidence" more than I should. It's much like eating vegetables can be hard for some people. You know you need to do it, you know it's good for you, you know you're "supposed' to eat those veggies but it's hard and you need accountability to keep on trucking and not fall off the wagon. I need accountability to keep some mellowness in my life LOL (that sounds like a contradiction!) but my default mode is "hard core" and without any checks and balances...well.....I've seen what happens, LOL.

 

I guess I am hoping OM will serve as my accountability guide.

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I need accountability to keep some mellowness in my life LOL (that sounds like a contradiction!) but my default mode is "hard core" and without any checks and balances...well.....I've seen what happens, LOL.

 

I guess I am hoping OM will serve as my accountability guide.

 

 

This part of your post is why I thought that OM might be a good choice for you. I think seeing what is normal level work for your kids will allow you to ultimately give yourself more freedom moving forward. :) I hope it does accomplish what you want it to do.

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I need accountability to keep some mellowness in my life LOL (that sounds like a contradiction!) but my default mode is "hard core" and without any checks and balances...well.....I've seen what happens, LOL.

 

I guess I am hoping OM will serve as my accountability guide.

 

I get that way too. It seems okay to me, of course, and also my "more hardcore/intense than I am" son) but it absolutely overwhelms my dd (and dh! :lol: ) We had a rough year because dd just seemed to be overloaded most of the time. It was second grade (she turned 8 a month ago.) She loves to read and reads well, she learned cursive, she knows how to add/subtract with composing/decomposing, she's a great speller.. I needed to chill out a little with her and take the time to appreciate what she does know rather than pushing forward into new territory all the time. She's a true meanderer, and if anything I probably need to take a clue from her once in a while. :blush:

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