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my too-old-child-to-not-be-reading, cant read


chadzwife
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She is now 8. Her 3 older sibs learned to read easily. Her younger sib did too and reads better at 6 than she. She is somewhat dyslexic, but most of the symptoms do not fit her. She is a fair oral speller. her handwriting is nice. She can remember math facts and grasp concepts. She understands telling time. She talked and walked early. She has good motor skills. Her younger sib is quite delayed usually in new skills and is reading fine! argh

But my 8yo will insert letters, not know what letters say, not keep on the right line, not know the word 3 seconds after she's read it. She can answer comprehension questions and tells me stories she makes up and sings songs. But if she has to read a word twice, it's a painstaking sounding-out process like she didn't sound it out just a bit b4! She'll cry, she'll wiggle, she won't look at the page. She is not ADD in anyway in any other area or subject. This kid knew alot of letters values (sounds) by age 3! She was putting together big A with the little a and big R with the little r as well as S and s and C and c at age 4. She just can NOT get fluent in her reading. At ALL.

Last week she told me the purple on the page was bothering her,...she gets annual eye exams...now she sees purple when she tries to read!?!? she was very casual about it, like it's always there... :(

no more mention of it this week. Wait, I just asked her blatantly if she always sees purple when she reads and if it gets in the way. Yep, its does. I took her this week to see the eye doctor specifically to see about this problem and he found nothing and suggested a visual perception battery which the school psychologist or occupational therapist does at school. So my insurance wont cover it for him to do it. So i cant get it done....

anyone have experience like this? or know someone who did? or know anyone in the rochester, ny area who is homeschooler friendly or homeschool themselves and who is a psychologist or occ therapist?

im about tearing my hair out.

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Get her to a COVD to get her eyes checked. So many of her symptoms sound like a visual perception/tracking problem, and can be helped by vision therapy. We did it with dd a year ago. She was about to turn 7, and could barely read. Skipped lines, words, letters. Guessed at words, couldn't remember the word she had just read and read it again. We took her to a COVD to get her eyes checked and found that while she had 20/20 vision, she had some major tracking and convergence issues. Six months of vision therapy, during which we did NO further reading instruction, and at the end of it, she was reading chapter books. The same kid who would cry at a BOB book six months earlier. Our doctor didn't take insurance, so it was all out of pocket. Total cost for exam and therapy was around $3,600. Ouch. However, we scrimped and saved, and I would absolutely do it again in a heartbeat if we had to. It made a WORLD of difference not only in the reading, but in her confidence. I also learned quite a bit about how she learns and processes things, and as a result, I've changed my expectations and methods of working with her. School is rarely a struggle now. (she's a typical 8 year old who would rather be climbing a tree than doing school, so she does complain sometimes lol. But there are no tears and she isn't so down on herself anymore). She now says reading is her favorite thing, and can often be found curled up reading.

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yeeeeeah, this is exactly wat i wanted the eye dr to tell me as its wats going on with her. wat the heck is wrong these optometrists/opthamologists??

the thing is i am a single mom with absolutely no child support coming in and have very little income. it may as well be $36,000 to me. i need to find someone who can help her on a sliding scale.

off to go google COVD now lol

my friend whom ive lsot contact with now had a son like this decades ago and he needed the muscle exercises etc. and then guess wat?? he READ fine. thanks for the info!

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When I took my son to a COVD doctor his state health insurance covered it. I got a referral from his regular doctor just in case. So maybe that is an option for you. In the meantime, you might check out librivox for some free audio books for her to listen to - my son really enjoys a lot of the books there (and at the library).

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My dd has visual problems and Phonics Pathways and Reading Pathways have helped immensely! We had to stop OPGTR because it wasn't working for her. We switched to 100 Easy Lessons and it was easier for her because the words on the page for her to read are so different. After 100EZ, I tried going back to OPGTR at about Lesson 75, but she was still struggling. I did a lot of research and decided to try PP. I checked it out of the library and used it intensively for two weeks, then tried OPGTR again. There was a HUGE difference. We are now doing Reading Pathways and while I still have to slow her down and make her repeat things where she added in letters, etc., her fluency has improved dramatically. She is now able to use OPGTR again. We alternate the two.

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If cost is a factor, I'd at least try as hard as I could to get the exam. For us, that cost about $400. However, after reviewing the results with our doctor, we had a much better understanding of what was going on. Armed with the information of any issues your dd is having, you could look into books or webpages for exercises. Definitely not the same as vision therapy with a trained therapist, but it would help.

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I forgot to mention too, our doctor was more than willing to work with her patients. As any good doctor is. She had payment plans, scholarships, she would waivefees, spread out appointments, ect. I had a friend who had a dd that needed therapy, but due to cost and distance, couldn't commit to once per week therapy. She put her dd on a plan that was every other week, increasing the home work, but decreasing the overall travel and cost.

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I'd see a dr right away!

 

 

And, I'd buy & use IEW's PAL reading & writing. We used Phonics Pathways for our first 3 children with ease. Child #4 had each issues & struggled with PP. Really struggled & I was lost what to do. I was skeptical of starting PAL but IEW has 100% lifetime guarantee! It was the BEST choice I ever made! I wish all of my children had used it- it's more than reading, it's a complete language program! :) Of course we adjusted the program for our family- after a few weeks, my two children using it were ready for much greater depth copywork.

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Is there a school of optometry anywhere close to you? I just took my DS for a binocular vision exam at the UC Berkeley clinic. Our family's vision insurance covered the cost of the exam but there was a mention on the information sheet about sliding scale fees for families without insurance coverage. Student interns did the exam but supervised by a full professor, who also reviewed the report before I got it.

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what i dont get is how the exam can be covered and not the treatment/therapy? this makes no sense to me ARGH

yes u have a broken leg, but we're not going to cover the cast to treat it...uh YEAH

is this COVD something not mainstream yet? like physical therapy wasnt a few decades ago? or massage therapy still isnt? shoot, chiropractics is still considered a sham by my family lol

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yay i found an open eye doctor this morning off the COVD site and blue choice option will cover the therapy as its a medical condition! now the examitself is iffy as she's now had two exams this year....but its a medical condition now so it's a different exam...hopefully! :)

YAY

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im trying to avoid school district involvement at all costs. otherwise i wud push to have them test her at least to save that expense. i'll see what happens with the appt in 3 wks at the developmental vision doctor's.

thanx to all for ur wonderful help. i knew something was up, something was very wrong. u helped me zero in on it BINGO :)

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  • 1 month later...

well its been a month since we saw the eye dr. he gave me a few exercises to do with her and glasses for her slight farsightedness. she's not making any progress. he's doing perceptual testing with her in a week (WHY we had to wait 5wks for the rest of the testing *IDK*) but I don't expect much more help from him. he said to just keep doing reading with her.

can anyone give me suggestions for a reading specialist or something to read for me to teach her correctly? I am at my wits end. I can not get her to read --- fluently. she generally painstakingly sounds out bell, pat and mark, simple phonetic words. 2 syllable words are tough and she hates them. getting spelling/reading rules into her brain for her to pull up as needed is almost impossible.

AND NOW MY 6YO IS STARTING TO LOSE HER READING ABIILITY ALSO

copying older sister? same problem just not showing up till same age? idk, but im so tired of this :(

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Reading just clicked with my eight year old son this year. He has Central Auditory Processing Disorder. He has been going to Speech Therapy and Occupational Therapy for over a year. We used Phonics Road this year and it really helped. The biggest improvement lately has been sight words on index cards and using as flash cards to memorize them. After learning 30 or so, we started using Abeka or Saxon readers. He would highlight in 1 color the words he knew (not sound out but knew by sight). We would sit together and read. He reads the highlighted words, I read the nonhighlighted words. We would start with two pages and every day add two more. This has helped so much with his fluency and confidence. As he recognizes and remembers words, he will go back and highlight them on the already highlighted pages.

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I would take what the doctor has given you so far to your local PS district and ask them for the appropriate evaluation. By law they have to do testing for home and private schooled students in their district.

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She is now 8. Her 3 older sibs learned to read easily. Her younger sib did too and reads better at 6 than she. She is somewhat dyslexic, but most of the symptoms do not fit her. She is a fair oral speller. her handwriting is nice. She can remember math facts and grasp concepts. She understands telling time. She talked and walked early. She has good motor skills. Her younger sib is quite delayed usually in new skills and is reading fine! argh

But my 8yo will insert letters, not know what letters say, not keep on the right line, not know the word 3 seconds after she's read it. She can answer comprehension questions and tells me stories she makes up and sings songs. But if she has to read a word twice, it's a painstaking sounding-out process like she didn't sound it out just a bit b4! She'll cry, she'll wiggle, she won't look at the page. She is not ADD in anyway in any other area or subject. This kid knew alot of letters values (sounds) by age 3! She was putting together big A with the little a and big R with the little r as well as S and s and C and c at age 4. She just can NOT get fluent in her reading. At ALL.

Last week she told me the purple on the page was bothering her,...she gets annual eye exams...now she sees purple when she tries to read!?!? she was very casual about it, like it's always there... :( no more mention of it this week. Wait, I just asked her blatantly if she always sees purple when she reads and if it gets in the way. Yep, its does. I took her this week to see the eye doctor specifically to see about this problem and he found nothing and suggested a visual perception battery which the school psychologist or occupational therapist does at school. So my insurance wont cover it for him to do it. So i cant get it done....

anyone have experience like this? or know someone who did? or know anyone in the rochester, ny area who is homeschooler friendly or homeschool themselves and who is a psychologist or occ therapist?

im about tearing my hair out.

 

Well, my younger dd didn't read at her age level until she was 9 1/2. That your dd isn't reading at her age level isn't disturbing to me. :-)

 

It's good that you're going to get further evaluations. :-)

 

What are you using now to teach her to read? She just might need something different. Being the resident Spalding geek, I would, of course, recommend that. :-)

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yeeeeeah, this is exactly wat i wanted the eye dr to tell me as its wats going on with her. wat the heck is wrong these optometrists/opthamologists??

the thing is i am a single mom with absolutely no child support coming in and have very little income. it may as well be $36,000 to me. i need to find someone who can help her on a sliding scale.

off to go google COVD now lol

my friend whom ive lsot contact with now had a son like this decades ago and he needed the muscle exercises etc. and then guess wat?? he READ fine. thanks for the info!

Can you apply for Medicaid or some other cheap insurance for your children?  I don't know where you are, but I know Florida has a Florida Healthy Kids program that is on a sliding scale.  Medicaid would cover what your child needs.

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For reading, nothing has been better than Dancing Bears. It's putting those patterns into DS's brain and he is SO MUCH more fluent now - I can say he is a slow/delayed reader, and not a struggling/non reader. And my son is 10, almost 11. I've done Spell to Write a Read with him (a Spalding knock-off), and that was the best at the time, since he couldn't blend sounds. (I'm not sure if your DD has grasped blending from your post. Mine could not get blending at all for a long time.)

 

I second checking with the state - they covered a COVD doctor visit for my son. And I would check for COVD - we had to drive 100 miles to get to one, but he did tell us the problem: DS was extremely literal - if you said "the dog jumped" he did / could not picture a dog in his mind, and couldn't process the sentence - it meant nothing to him, just sounds. So long story short, we didn't need expensive therapy, just to follow the Dr's advice & stop reading lessons to work on his ability to visualize. (We used Visualizing and Verbalizing, in case anyone wants to know. After that we did mostly SWR, and now Dancing Bears.)

 

In your shoes, I would try Dancing Bears Book A by Sound Foundations. Shipping is included in the price, and it's only 10 minutes a day. And I would keep trying to get the 'purple' issue straightened out with an eye-doctor if you find a way. And keep reading (both aloud to her and the reading posts on these forums). And go on Librivox to download some children's classic books as audio - they are free and have been a godsend for my eldest son. That's my non-expert, 3/4 of the way through the tunnel advice, completely free.  :lol: Hang in there!  :gnorsi:

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Jaden---I keep waiting for sight words to kick in even. but they don't. altho sight words is not true reading anyway. My dd has that disorder also, from wat the COVD can tell so far.

I am a orthographics geek also (Orton-Gillingham, Spalding, Detmer) and use Alphaphonics to teach reading then use Detmer's Phonics for Reading & Spelling. I looked at, and rly longed to use, the Phonics Road but she wont sell it without the dvds and that makes the program completely obscenely priced. I'd like to use it only becuz transitioning into her Latin Road would be seamless. Phonics Road is just another HS version of Spalding and I like Detmer's that I use now. Whats funny is that the Orton-Gillingham method is recc'd to be used with these kids! So Im already doing all I can that way.

I just want some progress as the COVD said to keep doing reading with her (we already read outloud lots or do bks/quality stories on tape lots). So I figured he thot she will make progress with the few things he gave me to do with her, directionality and setting table and such, along with her new glasses. Why he would he waste yet another month? He knows we HS and are doing it this summer also.

Appt on Friday; maybe it'll be profitable, unlike the last appt.

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I also used WRTR with my other 7 children, one of which didn't read until 3rd grade. But one of my 8 needed VT and the notched card system recommended with the I See Sam readers. Something about those readers got my dtr reading at a fluent third grade level by 10. I also did Recipe for Reading (slower paced O-G) at the same time to reinforce rules and help with spelling. But the I See SAM readers helped the most with her working memory issues. Finally, I used REWARDS when she was 11 to help with multisyllabic words. Now this summer, I opened WRTR to specifically work on her spelling and expect to do this with her until she is 18 :lol: Hope this helps.

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My daughter was about nine years old when she started reading.  I had tried so many different methods prior to that, and none of them worked with her.  About a year before she started reading, I stopped trying.  I (and others in the house) read everything to her.  One day it clicked.  She went from not reading to reading well.  

 

This past school year she read 79 books - on only one library card.  We have three cards that she uses.  For some reason the book tracking wasn't turned on with the other cards, but she kept those maxed as well.  I don't doubt that she read a couple hundred books (chapter/novel books) last school year.  She reads 4 or more a week.  

 

Continue with the evaluations, and I hope all is well.  For some, it will click with them on their own time.   :grouphug:

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Google Irlen syndrome. The initial screening for my DS was only $50 in Texas.

 

Also go to the Barton Reading website. There is a lot of information available even if you don't want to use the Barton program.

 

My DS also new is letters and individual letter sounds at 4, and he is very good at math, but reading had always been a struggle. I have decided to do the Barton program with him even though he does not have a formal dyslexia diagnosis.

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The reason your doctor didn't suggest a COVD is because it is not an accepted part of mainstream medicine for most purposes.

 

Is there ever anyone who goes to a COVD and is told that everything is fine?

 

The AAP does not recognise behavioural vision therapy.

 

We went to a COVD and were not sent to any therapy, since I think that's what you are driving at. The doctor actually gave us some good step-by-step ideas, but I needed more handholding and bought Visualizing and Verbalizing. (Under $100 with one of the V/V Stories books, and I resold for $50 or so. Which is a bargain IMHO.)

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<<The reason your doctor didn't suggest a COVD is because it is not an accepted part of mainstream medicine for most purposes.>>

If wasn't accepted or standard procedure or whatever, Medicaid wud not pay for it, believe me! lol Medicaid pays for nothing they don't have to. Chiropractics has been accepted, as well as massage therapy, for a couple decades, with most insurances covering both. Not Medicaid tho.

I was rly thinking Medicaid wud not pay for the COVD. But it does. AND there are COVD eye drs who actually TAKE Medicaid. A lot of specialists don't take it as they get paid a fraction wat they wud from other insurances.

 

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also found this wen I googled Irlen syndrome. if ur into scientific evidence published in peer-reviewed journals. I cant help that the AAP doesn't support it yet. this is the same organization that promoted the barbaric practice of male infant circumcision for a number of decades. my view of medical cronies is understandably dim :0

National and International Research Studies

The Irlen Method and the efficacy of colored overlays and colored lenses has been the subject of over 100 research studies encompassing the disciplines of education, psychology, and medicine. To date, more than 60 of these studies supporting the use of colored overlays and lenses to treat the perceptual processing difficulties associated with Irlen Syndrome are published in peer-reviewed academic and scientific journals, including the Journal of Learning Disabilities, Australian Journal of Special Education, Perceptual and Motor Skills, Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities, Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology, Journal of Research in Reading, and Behavioral Optometry among others.

See a list of related journal articles >>

A recent review of 62 studies published in peer-reviewed journals found 56 studies with positive findings, 45 with positive results for particular reading skills, and 11 showing improvements in accommodation facility, eye movements while reading, and reduced headaches/migraine.
Independent research projects are ongoing at various universities in the United States, England, Australia, Switzerland, Italy, and New Zealand.

Colored overlays are considered an approved accommodation for standardized tests by many states including California, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Nevada, and Oklahoma.

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The reason your doctor didn't suggest a COVD is because it is not an accepted part of mainstream medicine for most purposes.

 

Is there ever anyone who goes to a COVD and is told that everything is fine?

 

The AAP does not recognise behavioural vision therapy.

Yup. In fact only ONE of my THREE kids was recommended for treatment. The other two were declared "fine" and "minor tracking, try these glasses for a year to help her eyes at school". That child is now glasses free.

 

I hope you don't take this wrong - but I'm really trying to understand what your beef is with COVD. It seems personal to you....

 

Those of us with kids that have issues know there is something. In fact, my COVD doc was my biggest champion in pushing me to seek more MEDICAL evals for my child because he could tell something else was going on. He validated my perceptions/feelings that we didn't know her whole story. You know what? That child was having absence seizures. I had 3 specialists resisting my request for a Neurology referral - they said I was doing everything already. Well I wasn't, and she bombed the EEG we snuck in (the scheduler and I). Oh and the Neurologist? He didn't discount the COVD findings either, instead being happy to have answers on that end.

 

I have double vision. I can take an exam and the doctor won't know. BTDT. The issues it causes me to this day - at 44 - are real.

 

Central Auditory Processing Disorder was/is not considered "real" either.... but it is. The medical establishment does not adapt to change well - but the whole point of SCIENCE is that we learn more about how our bodies work, and our methods of treating them must change.

 

Oh and our Ped is at and on faculty at a University with a popular Med School. She doesn't discount the vision aspect of DDs issues, nor the CAPD. 

 

Anyway, I hope the OP gets some help that works. I'd suggest testing for CAPD which I think played the biggest issue in DDs struggles with learning to read.

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My son benefited greatly from vision therapy (my other son was evaluated and was fine; a reputable dr. would never dx a child who didn't have an issue).

 

But I would check into Dancing Bears reading program if you can. Their spelling program has worked wonders for my poor speller (with "soft" dyslexia signs).

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My daughter is a struggling reader also. I have attended a few conferences of Diane Craft. She makes a lot of sense and her products are made for homeschoolers and are affordable. She address alot of different issues that could be hindering your child. You should at least give it a look. www.dianecraft.org

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<<I'd suggest testing for CAPD which I think played the biggest issue in DDs struggles with learning to read.>>

 

I think that's wat the COVD md did, was to test for those issues. or is this somewhere else who tests for that?

he said to me the first visit that she had a processing problem with her visual input. but he just finished up the testing this Friday so I don't have his official report till prob next Friday. hes done nothing rly beyond glasses and some exercises -- that have dun nothing. no further visits for any kind of therapy.

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<<I'd suggest testing for CAPD which I think played the biggest issue in DDs struggles with learning to read.>>

 

I think that's wat the COVD md did, was to test for those issues. or is this somewhere else who tests for that?

he said to me the first visit that she had a processing problem with her visual input. but he just finished up the testing this Friday so I don't have his official report till prob next Friday. hes done nothing rly beyond glasses and some exercises -- that have dun nothing. no further visits for any kind of therapy.

CAPD is Central Auditory Processing Disorder, a trained audiologist tests for it in the booth. 

 

This summary is what pushed me to push the doctors on testing. My gut knew it, but sometimes you can't convince "them" about it you know?

 

http://www.hslda.org/strugglinglearner/sn_auditory.asp

 

They have info for visual issues too (my DD has both, but her auditory is worse): http://www.hslda.org/strugglinglearner/sn_visual.asp

 

My daughter was really in bad shape because of having both issues, it was no wonder she was such a late reader given these and her other issues! She has very very slow processing all across the board. I joke that when she gets hurt - she will figure it out and tell me the week after it happens! LOL!!

 

Here is a good book on it - see if your library has it. Even if it doesn't end up fitting your daughter, you will learn some interesting things that will help you about hearing and aging! :D

 

http://www.amazon.com/When-Brain-Cant-Hear-ebook/dp/B000FC0WOM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1375035034&sr=8-1&keywords=when+the+brain+can%27t+hear

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yes, Dianne crafts site seems very good...for anyone else wondering

my dd is so difficult to pinpoint as she has very very few symptoms like ANYthing else ever listed under the 4 learning channels (or gates as Dianne calls them) she just cant friggin read. she crawled correctly, is very coordinated, happy and optimistic, she loves to write and learn, attends very well to task, spells not bad verbally or written (for wat shes been able to rly learn about phonics without being able to read--the two things are soo connected, if u cant practice the rules while u DEcode, its hard to have them wen u ENcode, but she DOES somewat --another reason I know she friggin smart), knows lots of history and science facts and is fine in math.

so I ll be checking out the diannecraft.org today :)

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now i am starting to wonder if the COVD dr said she doesnt need vision therapy as its soooo expensive that i bet its just that medicaid wont cover it :(

dianne craft says vision therapy is wonderful but unaffordable for most families. if u cud do her program and vision therapy, shes says all the better.

makes one wonder, eh?

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She is now 8. Her 3 older sibs learned to read easily. Her younger sib did too and reads better at 6 than she. She is somewhat dyslexic, but most of the symptoms do not fit her. She is a fair oral speller. her handwriting is nice. She can remember math facts and grasp concepts. She understands telling time. She talked and walked early. She has good motor skills. Her younger sib is quite delayed usually in new skills and is reading fine! argh

But my 8yo will insert letters, not know what letters say, not keep on the right line, not know the word 3 seconds after she's read it. She can answer comprehension questions and tells me stories she makes up and sings songs. But if she has to read a word twice, it's a painstaking sounding-out process like she didn't sound it out just a bit b4! She'll cry, she'll wiggle, she won't look at the page. She is not ADD in anyway in any other area or subject. This kid knew alot of letters values (sounds) by age 3! She was putting together big A with the little a and big R with the little r as well as S and s and C and c at age 4. She just can NOT get fluent in her reading. At ALL.

Last week she told me the purple on the page was bothering her,...she gets annual eye exams...now she sees purple when she tries to read!?!? she was very casual about it, like it's always there... :(

no more mention of it this week. Wait, I just asked her blatantly if she always sees purple when she reads and if it gets in the way. Yep, its does. I took her this week to see the eye doctor specifically to see about this problem and he found nothing and suggested a visual perception battery which the school psychologist or occupational therapist does at school. So my insurance wont cover it for him to do it. So i cant get it done....

anyone have experience like this? or know someone who did? or know anyone in the rochester, ny area who is homeschooler friendly or homeschool themselves and who is a psychologist or occ therapist?

im about tearing my hair out.

We enrolled with a charter school last year specifically to get our evaluations paid for my ds.  We weren't in the school 2 weeks when he tested at risk.  All it took then was a phone call to the pediatrician telling them that the "school" referred ds to have an evaluation after testing at risk.  Within 1 month, we had our evaluation and diagnosis all paid for by our insurance....

I don't know what to tell you b/c testing and evaluations are expensive out of pocket.  If you can sign up under an umbrella or charter school, you should be able to get a referral so your insurance will pay.

 

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Sara in AZ--isnt Dianne amazing?? she HSled her son and then went into institutional skl to teach remedial students for the last 25 yrs. so shes on it! lol

she actually RESOLVES the neurological issues, not just teaches them coping strategies. TRUE FREEDOM to go on to LEARN!

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<<DD 2 Honestly? Watching too much Elmo on my phone.>>

:rofl: 

 

been there, dun that!

 

well it was 20 yrs ago, so it Mr Rogers and Captain Kangaroo on PBS but...

 

wat helped us was to assign someone to do stuff with her while i was with another kid or showering, etc. bingo!

i had a rotating schedule of who was with me for an allotted time and who was with her and who working alone. ...a la Managers of Their Homes...but b4 it came out lol

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Could you try some colored transparency pages to set over the top of the page she's reading?  Definitely less than $3600, and might help her be able to see the words more easily on the page.  This was a very big help to one of my nieces.

 

HTH

 

This was my immediate thought too, when the color troubles were mentioned. It's easy and cheap, so worth a try.

 

I also wonder about the possibility of synesthesia.

 

Just wanted to chime in with Ellie...

while I had two overnight readers at 5 my middle one did not really read until well into his ninth year.

 

He went from struggling with sam books to rick riordan in the 6 months.

 

He has had vision issues and still prefers school work to be read does enjoy free reading in short bursts.

 

try not to despair...keep working on the therapy option obviously but she may just have her own time table and hasn't hit it yet.

 

My DS was the same way. At 8.5 reading suddenly really clicked for him, and he quickly went from way behind to above grade level in reading.

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