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ereks mom

Do we have a Hits & Misses thread for 2012-2013 yet?

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Most of our curriculum choices were hits, but the biggest successes were:

 

Writing Skills, Book 2 (2e) -- This was GREAT! My writing-hating 8th grader enjoyed it most of the time, and lessons were mostly short and sweet, so she didn't feel overwhelmed. I liked it so much that I'm having my 10th/11th grader use it over the summer because she had woefully little writing and grammar in her previous school before she came to me this year. In the fall, all of my students will be using Writing Skills, Book 3. I just wish I'd found this series years ago for my own children!

 

TT Pre-Algebra 2e for 8th & TT Algebra 1 1e for 10th -- My 10th grader started off the year with TT Algebra 2, but halfway through the year, we hit a wall & had to drop back to Algebra 1 because she just didn't have the foundation (although she had attended the most prestigious/rigorous school in our area :glare:). The first edition moves very slowly, and it was just what she needed. At last, she began to understand math!

 

Home Economics (sewing) -- We started off with Stitches & Pins and branched out on our own. EK & my other students made a quilt to donate to our local Project Linus chapter. Our local newspaper even published a brief article about the girls and their quilt. :D

 

Castles of Character, Teen Edition -- DVD character curriculum from InCorVa.com. My students responded well to this, and it really got them thinking. They enjoyed watching the DVD and had very good discussions about the topics.

 

Summer Promise and other books in the Christy Miller series by Robin Jones Gunn -- The girls LOVED these books. Even my reading-haters could hardly wait to find out what happened next.

 

 

As always, some curriculum choices worked much better than others, and the only true misses were:

 

Vocabulary Workshop -- I wanted to love this, but no available answer key meant that it was back on the shelf by the 3rd week of school. :(

 

The Phantom Tollbooth - None of us (4 girls + me) liked this. I know it gets rave reviews, but we just thought it was silly.

 

Civics in America - This book was highly recommended on the boards awhile back, but I didn't like it at all.

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The Phantom Tollbooth - None of us (4 girls + me) liked this. I know it gets rave reviews, but we just thought it was silly.

 

Could that have been an age thing? I would imagine a book for elementary school kids might simply not hold the interest of teen and adult readers.

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Hits:

AoPS Calculus. As always, AoPS lived up to expectations. Too bad it is their last book.

 

Quite good so far:

Prego! Introduction to Italian. We have only started the book, but the combination of book, workbook and audio CDs with lab manual seems to work well.

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No misses from my perspective. We've especially loved Omnibus and the associated books, and Wheelock's Latin Reader was great too (class through Lukeion). He didn't like DIVE Biology, but he doesn't like natural sciences and it got the job done.

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Absolute hit-----honoring dd's request to take the AoPS Geometry online course! It is the first time in her life that she has truly been challenged, and it is such a thrill to see her rising to the challenge!

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Giant miss- Jacob's Geometry. So much a miss we had to start over with TT in October.

 

Hits: Kolbe for 9th grade English/lit/history. I was worried it would be just too much or too hard but the syllabus broke it down in to manageable parts. When it was too much we were able to adjust pretty easily. It wasn't necessarily fun but ds learned alot. He is really proud of the reading and writing he did and is glad he did it even though it wasn't easy. The challenge level was just right for him. We're looking forward to continuing this for 10th.

 

Outsourcing biology to co-op and a Landry Academy lab intensive was a hit. I discovered that I do need to make use of outsourcing throughout high school just because of the pressure it takes off in at least a subject or two. I'll be outsourcing chem, math, and a couple electives next year and I am looking forward to that.

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:lurk5: We're just at the beginning of our highschool journey, so I look forward to hearing more hits and misses. I was surprised that you didn't like the Phantom Tollbooth: we loved it and found it very funny. My ds still talks about it. Perhaps it's suited to kids in the logic stage, and perhaps more for boys.

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I was surprised that you didn't like the Phantom Tollbooth: we loved it and found it very funny. My ds still talks about it. Perhaps it's suited to kids in the logic stage, and perhaps more for boys.

 

 

:iagree: My boys read it in the 4th-6th grade range and absolutely LOVED it. I thought it was so-so.

 

We had no misses this year; that has got to be a first! Honestly, I hadn't realized it until I saw this thread. We did not drop or switch anything. What a blessing!

 

Notgrass U.S. History was a surprise hit. I assumed my son would just tolerate it, but instead he really enjoyed it, and it sparked a lot of discussion in our home.

 

The biggest hit was hosting a biology lab in our home with 6 other high school students. This was so much fun that we are doing the same for chemistry next year. And maybe physics the next. Doing labs in a group setting is really worthwhile.

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No misses this yr other than me being mentally missing in action!

 

Hit......I am totally shocked to be saying this, but Paradise Lost was a huge hit. Loved tne Naxos recording. Dante's Inferno was actually a let down after Paradise Lost. Could be bc we are running out of steam after a very stressful few months of upheaval. (We decided to stop after Inferno even though the original plan was to read the entire Comedy.). But in the future I would read them in the reverse order.

 

Another couple of major hits......ds's philosophy of science and religion course as well as our CS Lewis study.

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Hits:

 

Windows to the World literary analysis course. I taught this in a coop and it was just great. I used part of the Jill Pike syllabus (only the W2W portion) and modified the rubrics a bit to take out IEW specific grading items (I graded for "clear, vivid writing with smooth transitions" rather than for dress ups. I think that all of the kids in the group made miles of progress in their ability to tackle fiction and then write about it. I did really like how the Jill Pike syllabus added in a couple novels.

 

Lukeion Latin This was probably the hardest class my kids have ever done. I don't recommend it if you need to self pace courses or if a strict homework schedule is not for you. But I cannot say enough about how much Latin they learned. They went through the first half of Wheelocks, and that is a deep book. By contrast the local (very academic) high school uses Ecce Romani. I love Ecce Romani (and it does have more culture content) but it doesn't have the same strong grammar instruction.

 

Misses:

Anything self paced this year. The time demands of sports, coop and Lukeion weighed on us and I allowed too many other subjects to slide. That really snowballed over the year. I'm picking up the pieces over the summer (yeah summer school - home school edition) and then being more diligent for the next year.

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Another couple of major hits......ds's philosophy of science and religion course.

 

8 --

 

Was this a self-designed course or something you outsourced or purchased? I think my son would probably enjoy something like this.

 

TIA,

Brenda

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No misses this yr other than me being mentally missing in action!

 

We had other misses but I can relate to this one for sure! :-)

 

 

Misses - Barrons AP French (it is for the new exam and dd found so many mistakes that she gave up using it). Spectrum Chem (I know some people like it but dd just didn't like the style).

 

Mixed review - Jurgensen Geometry (early edition) - dd loves the geometry (and found it is her new love) - but there was no Algebra review which turned into a problem of forgetting some basic concepts...

 

Dd really liked - TTC Western Literary Tradition, AP Human Geo with PA HS, To Kill a Mockingbird, Red Badge of Courage (big surprise since she's a girl),

 

I really liked - R & S grammar (finished up 8th grade book) - dd doesn't like grammar so I couldn't put it in that category. I find it so thorough and straight forward. Omnibus III analysis of Reflections on the Revolution in France, Atelier du langage 11e et Francais 11e by Hatier (Swiss versions of the French textbooks 11e = 9th grade now. Only problem is there are too many mistakes in the answer book).

 

Will add more later after discussing with dd,

Joan

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8 --

 

Was this a self-designed course or something you outsourced or purchased? I think my son would probably enjoy something like this.

 

TIA,

Brenda

 

I designed it last summer. I built it around 2 TC lecture series

http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=4691

http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=447

 

He read God and Nature. http://www.amazon.com/God-Nature-Historical-Encounter-Christianity/dp/0520056922

Socrates Meets Descartes/Hume/Kant/

Christianity for Modern Pagans: Pascal's Pensees http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_16?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=christianity+for+modern+pagans&sprefix=Christianity+for%2Cstripbooks%2C184

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Could that have been an age thing? I would imagine a book for elementary school kids might simply not hold the interest of teen and adult readers.

 

 

I imagine the fact that my students are teen girls was a big reason why it didn't go over well. The two who are not my own children are definitely logic stage students, though, and poor readers to boot. They HATE to read, and the vocabulary was simply over their heads. :ohmy:

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I designed it last summer. I built it around 2 TC lecture series

http://www.thegreatc...l.aspx?cid=4691

http://www.thegreatc...il.aspx?cid=447

 

He read God and Nature. http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/0520056922

Socrates Meets Descartes/Hume/Kant/

Christianity for Modern Pagans: Pascal's Pensees http://www.amazon.co...,stripbooks,184

Thanks! This looks really interesting!

 

Brenda

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Our biggest hits are our outsourced classes: DO Geometry and TPS French 1. Superb teachers who have been very supportive to dd and great to work with as a parent. Also, I'll agree w/Sebastian....IEW Intro to Literature has been fantastic. Dd and *I* have learned so much from that program. And dd's self-designed geography course has probably been her favorite subject, besides French, and it has helped build her research skills. Overall, a very good year!

 

Jennifer

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Hits - I still really like Trisms, it's going very well. Most of the other curriculum I used was fine, but nothing to rave over...

 

Misses: I have mixed feelings about the geometry and physics I used.

I was very hopeful about Sera's Discovering Geometry being that it is discovery based, which in my experience leads to a more long term understanding. However, there was so much leaping around (questions in the problem sets that were not even touched upon in the book) and way too much emphasis on projects - with not enough time spent on proofs at all.

I'm really happy to be going back to Foerster next year :)

 

As for Conceptual Physics by Hewitt - I think it's a good text. But I will say that not enough emphasis is placed on the algebra level math. While in the text the emphasis isn't there, it is there in other places (like the Concept Development workbook). I was not happy at all with the labs that went along with the book. Most were a complete waste of time, actually.

 

I'm still glad we did the physics course, and I don't feel we wasted any time with it, but I don't know if I'd go back and do it again - at least not with that text and those labs.

 

 

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9th grade hits:

 

Windows to the World - helped literal minded boy understand literary analysis

K12 World History text-used first half, ds preferred much better to Spielvogel that we began with

 

9th grade misses:

DO Geometry - Derek Owens was not the problem - Harold's Geometry was. The type of problems in the text did not click well with ds. Some chapters Derek Owens assigns a lot and ds took hours to get a lesson done.

 

Mixed reviews:

La Clase Divertida high school Spanish - liked format but there were scheduling/pacing issues for ds.

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11th grade hits:

 

National History Day competition - this was dd's 1st time and she LOVED it. Learned a ton as well as great research skills. Will participate again next year.

 

DO Precalculus - class well organized, although dd sometimes impatient with Derek Owens lecture style. When she gets something, she want to move on quickly!

 

11th grade misses:

 

American Pageant textbook - at first dd enjoyed the breezy writing style and sometimes flippant tone. However, the book's tone overshadows clarity, and in later chapters, where she didn't have as much background knowledge, she found it very confusing.

 

Mixed reviews:

 

DO Physics - as with the precalc, class is well organized. However, dd not feeling confident about SAT Subject test (only 11 days away!) She knew that there were a couple of topics that DO didn't cover, but as she goes through review books, she's finding that she has some gaps on covered topics. She did regular track and not honors, so that might be the problem. She's studying like crazy but stressing out.

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We are year rounders and we do a lot of things with 2 other families so that we have a tiny group of all girls, ages 13-17.

 

Hits:

 

DD17 - American History via two TTC courses and the high school text from K12. She doesn't typically really care for history but enjoyed it this year.

 

DD17 - Outsourcing Anatomy & Physiology (to one of the dads who is a chiro) using Holes and Apologia. She hates Apologia but the rest of the class used it and so she really has to read each module. She found that this particular book wasn't so bad. Holes has a fair amount of online support and is enjoyable.

 

(Artist) DD16 - World History through the lens of the creators, i.e. artists and such. Still just in the beginning stages but it is definitely a good fit for her.

 

For Both:

LTOW in our small group - wowza. Hard to teach, amazing to go through the thought processes involved. These processes seemed kind of simple, until we started actually doing it. Then not so much. We aren't done yet, but already I see them applying what they have learned.

 

 

Implementing more project based learning...

DD17 used some Coursera classes for academic interests, some random TTC courses, started serious dog training with a very experienced trainer, read a lot of cognitive science/neuroscience stuff, started Civil Air Patrol.

 

DD16 started going to an open studio time at an art studio, is teaching herself to sew in order to re-purpose garments from Goodwill, etc., started baking and bought her own baking equipment, and really upped her time/output on her DeviantArt account.

 

Our little group did some small projects together and their next project is (probably) going to be to start a larger PBL teen group in the area.

 

Meh...

DD17 - Lials for Precalc. Can't really pin the problem down, but she is doing Aleks to fill in the holes at her request.

 

 

Misses

LLftLOTR - I know everyone loves this curriculum but our little group ended up all pretty much hating it. It was too easy, too canned, even for the youngest students. The questions are at such a low level and it just wasn't what we were looking for. I dropped the questions, but that didn't help. The unit studies were ok and we are enjoying them more, but I found better info in the extra books we got as go-alongs. It just never sparked the rabbit trails or the deeper thinking I was looking for. I cut the kids loose and things got immediately better, lol. (The group is all girls and the sighing over Legolas, Aragorn, Eomer, Faramir, etc. and now, since they saw The Hobbit, Fili and Kili is quite amusing...but really that's probably just me :lol: )

 

Artistic Pursuits

We didn't even watch 1 video and there was a revolution. I told the other mom they were way to advanced for this one! Chose a completely different curric at the convention (not sure what it is cause the other mother has it - maybe Artistic Pursuits??)

 

Georgia

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Rough year. Must've had a menopause meltdown :glare: Switched up all curriculum. Every. single. subject. My boys pretty much tolerated their weekly assignments. Nonetheless, we studied the Middle Ages to 1800 this year. Some hits were:

 

Christian History Made Easy, Timothy Paul Jones, Rose Publishing

History Odyssey, Level 3, provided structure and activities to Truthquest reading assignments.

Codecademy: the only assignments I didn't have to remind them to do.

Worldly Saints: Oldest son, 16, and I read it. Interesting perspective on the Puritans.

 

Misses:

 

Though I think it very important, we struggle to keep our timeline up to date.

While I appreciated Truthquest History for the reading list, I didn't appreciate the author's writing style. Writes with slang and too much punctuation. No assigned questions or projects caused me to have to come up with assignments weekly. Too much to manage on top of work.

Saxon math....need I say more?

 

Smiles,

Teresa

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Meh...

DD17 - Lials for Precalc. Can't really pin the problem down...

 

Misses

LLftLOTR - I know everyone loves this curriculum but our little group ended up all pretty much hating it. It was too easy, too canned, even for the youngest students. The questions are at such a low level and it just wasn't what we were looking for. I dropped the questions, but that didn't help. The unit studies were ok and we are enjoying them more, but I found better info in the extra books we got as go-alongs. It just never sparked the rabbit trails or the deeper thinking I was looking for.

 

Same experience here with both programs. I know everyone raves over Lial math, but I've been less than impressed. I think what I don't like about it is: 1) WAY too many problems in each problem set--I mean, when you have to have your kid do every 4th problem or so, that's TOO MUCH. Yes, I realize these are college texts, but I'd be willing to bet that college profs don't have students do every problem either. 2) The explanations are too complicated. We kept our BJU or TT math books nearby so that we could get better explanations.

 

As for LLLOTR, we really liked the unit studies, but the rest was just fluff.

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Misses for us this year were MUS Algebra (8th grade) & Algebra 2 (10th grade). We have always really liked MUS, but dd was bored in Algebra 1 and ds was lost without enough practice problems in Algebra 2. Both switched to Lial's with good success.

 

Hits:

Lial's Algebra 1 & 2. Ereks Mom, it is great you don't need that many problems, we really do. My kids do odds and we love that there are enough problems to really get it.

 

Apologia Chemistry. After swearing I'd never use Apologia, it was a good fit for my ds who wants to be a writer, not a scientist.

 

Excellence in Lit. was a huge hit with ds. Some really thoughtful conversations and papers were spawned by this.

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Well it was a year that wound up being more unschoolish than anything else which I refused to acknowledge until recently.

 

But we had a couple

 

Misses:

 

Waldorf essentials 3rd grade. Ds was not thrilled with waldorf methodology and by the 4th week was begging to do workbooks instead.

 

Hits:

 

AAR pre-1 and 1 both younger kids are now reading (ds9 after 3 years of struggling with other programs, SLP, etc doing great, dd5 just in the last couple weeks)

 

MUS- we returned to this this year after years of struggling with horizons, the teens are steadily working towards catching up to their grade level

 

hit and miss all in one:

 

Online lit classes, we took some of these with our school board. First term was all hits, 2nd term was all misses. The jr class that was supposed to be for 9-12 yr olds for ds was all 14-15 year olds so by week 3 he was lost, he could not keep up with the conversation. The teens had 2 lit classes and a history class but we spent so much time on the road for dd's dance competitions that they missed the entire 2nd half of term and could not keep up. In future we will only do semester 1 online classes.

 

Hopeful:

 

konos, we just started this and everyone is thrilled so far, once we have a whole year of it under our belt I can determine next year if it was a hit or a miss.

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DD17 - American History via two TTC courses and the high school text from K12. She doesn't typically really care for history but enjoyed it this year.

 

 

Georgia

 

 

Can you tell me the name of the K12 history text? Thanks!

 

My dd dislikes history, but liked K12 intermediate history book well enough. I am trying to bring her in to the history lovin' fold this year (we're doing Middle Ages) and she is the sort that really needs a spine or she gets lost!

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Senior: No misses. She took college courses for the bulk of her schoolwork. Did use Rosetta Stone online for Turkish, and that worked out well. They've got some interesting live options now that have raised my opinion of the R Stone, though I will always believe that immersion or an in-person tutor is the way to go for language learning. No tutor option for Turkish here though,

 

Freshman: Hmmm, no misses there either, with the possible exception of Mandarin 3 at the local high school. Not terrible, but going back to the tutor next year.

 

Derek Owens Precalculus turned out to be a GREAT followup to Teaching Textbook Alg 2. Was a little nervous about that, as pretests seemed to indicate trouble, but she ended up with a high A. Is prepping to do SAT Math 2 subject test now, and feels okay about it. Derek is very responsive to e mails if problems arise. She will do his Calculus course next year.

 

Apologia Physics (with co-op labs) was fine. Only used it because of the co-op. The teacher was a guy we knew, and retired high school physics/chemistry teacher (former student has a Nobel prize, which is kind of neat :-) ) She's using supplemental materials to prep for SAT physics test. They are going to continue with chemistry next year, so she will do that again.

 

Thinkwell American Govt: very good. Daughter used supplementary materials to prep for AP US Govt and Politics test, and felt confident. She wants to do World History next year, and I'm not sure what we will use, as Thinkwell does not have a course.

 

Write at Home Composition 2. With WaH, it comes down to your assigned teacher, and she had a decent one. May continue next year with their workshop type courses, and add some sort of literature course.

 

Electives were violin, piano, figure skating, rock climbing, and ballet, with either private or group instruction/coaching. Going to add orchestra at local high school next year.

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10th grade -

 

I don't know of any misses as such. Everything "worked" even if not everything was a favorite, if you know what I mean. Most subjects were ok - not super hits but not really misses.

 

Apologia Chemistry - the course itself was fine, in my opinion. What was a miss was our tutor who just stopped showing up with never a phone call afterward despite me leaving a couple of messages.

 

MP Trad. Logic II - I'd call this a hit, even though ds thought it a slog at times. I think it taught what it was supposed to, though, so that makes it a hit.

 

History / Lit. SWB style - great reads and discussions for medieval history.

 

Jacobs Geometry - Another slog at times for ds but he's understood it consistently and has taught him what it was supposed to.

 

Latin - Our tutor was a big hit. We use Galore Park

 

Classical guitar - ds's interest and ability in guitar has taken off even though he's largely abandoned the classical part of it lately.

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Hits:

 

Irasshai Japanese - a decent program that you can easily speed up or slow down as needed.

 

Theory of Knowledge - big hit, great discussions, made him interested in further philosophy classes

 

Computer Programming - this he has done all on his own. I've been very impressed with his focus and the projects he's developed. I have purposely guarded his creative free time and stayed out of the process (mainly because I know nothing about programming).

 

As of late he has picked up Electronics and researching the space programs. This week he watched a 5 hour history of the space program which he found on his own. We're studying astronomy/astrophysics next year, so this is a nice lead in - one he is doing all on his own. The electronics is something my dad is very knowledgeable about. My dad had a mild stroke this spring, so it's nice to see them bonding over something because grand parents don't last forever.

 

Misses:

 

Nothing was really awful this year, that's a change. We did have a few misses.

 

Physics - more my fault than his. Having trouble finding the right program. We've jumped around too much this year. Ironically, I think it will end up okay. We both signed up to do the Coursera Physics this summer. We're only on week two and we're doing some programming for the class. So, all of this programming experience will be helpful for ds. I think the connections are starting to click in his head. I'm learning a lot too.

 

Writing - WWS was a miss in his book. He simply doesn't think about writing like WWS teaches. I like the program and I'm still trying to pull sections out to use. Next year we're focusing on argumentation, learning what to say, we'll focus on the format and details along the way.

 

Life- Life kind of handed us a bowl of cherry pits this spring. It threw us off focus just when the momentum was building. It's going to change how our final 3 years together looks, but that one cannot be shelved and ignored.

 

 

The biggest hit has probably been ds himself. He's not a highly motivated student, but he's defined himself more this year. He's been vocal about what he likes and what he doesn't like, he's moving into the ownership phase of his education. I'm very excited to see where next year takes us (educationally) because it's so not what I would have picked for 10th grade, but it's truly a reflection of his choices on subject matter. I still pick how to cover it, which has been fun because is mostly opposite of my interests.

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Hits

Math - AoPS Geometry online - definite hit! everybody was very happy with it.

English - Prentice Hall 9th grade as spine. Skipped the questions but the literature selections are great. Added bunches of my own stuff and assignments on top of it. Book is a hit except for the questions.

Misses

History - BJU History - I think it's great but it was a miss in our homeschool because it's not

engaging. I don't see why education should be engaging but go figure. A miss. Unfortunately.

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Theory of Knowledge - big hit, great discussions, made him interested in further philosophy classes

Elegantlion, I have been looking at that book for us in a few years, but I was concerned that, from looking through the pages on amazon, it tended to teach more of a nihilist view of the world and of knowledge, ie where there are no meaning; just a bunch of different human constructions. :001_huh: Is that so?

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Elegantlion, I have been looking at that book for us in a few years, but I was concerned that, from looking through the pages on amazon, it tended to teach more of a nihilist view of the world and of knowledge, ie where there are no meaning; just a bunch of different human constructions. :001_huh: Is that so?

 

Well it presents viewpoints and doesn't really take a stance. The first two parts of on ways of knowing, the last part covers different aspects of knowing in different academic subjects. There is a chapter on religion which obviously is presented from a secular standpoint.

 

You can access some teacher material on this site by registering (it's free). That might give you more insight into the book itself to see if it fits your needs.

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I designed it last summer. I built it around 2 TC lecture series

http://www.thegreatc...l.aspx?cid=4691

http://www.thegreatc...il.aspx?cid=447

 

He read God and Nature. http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/0520056922

Socrates Meets Descartes/Hume/Kant/

Christianity for Modern Pagans: Pascal's Pensees http://www.amazon.co...,stripbooks,184

 

I wanted to mention that the two courses -- Science & Religion (a treatment of Christianity and science through the mid-20th century or so) and Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History of the 17th and 18th Centuries -- are currently on sale. The audio of Science & Religion (video doesn't sound esp. necessary here) can be downloaded for $15; audio for Birth of the Modern Mind is $35.

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Hits:

Understanding the Times--the new edition. It covers far more than my old one.

 

British History using Churchill's History of Eng Speaking Peoples and Fraser's Story of Britain. He read a zillion other books and wrote 12 papers.

 

Apologia's Physical Sci--youngest dd needed a formal sci before we start bio to learn lab procedure, etc.

 

Orchestra at the uni, 2nd year. Until last year, we were with a youth orchestra that was a disaster. Director had not wanted her to move to the uni yet or he would have had no cello section in the youth orchestra. I finally got tough and said, no. The older girls started at 10, but we held last one off until 12 and she missed a lot of good music that way.

 

Doing precalc at the uni ALONG with Saxon Adv Math. I have had several kids go through Adv Math and then straight to calc in college and two of them struggled. I do think part of the struggle was due to lousy professors, but I think ds is set up for more success next year.

 

Misses: trying to do Photoshop as the arts elective. Ds just kept "forgetting". Finally lowered the boom, said you ARE doing music appreciation counting all the concerts you've been dragged to all these years, plus TC CDs. Get over it! It's still not done, but it will be by the end of the summer.

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