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Teaching a computer motivated Aspie aka HFA kid


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Guest Inga

Just wondering if there is anyone out there who has "given in" to an aspie that is very computer motivated. I am not a big fan of screen time, however, he really learns best with computer based programs. It seems to go against everything in him to sit with a book. I try and try but it is wearing me out. I am teaching two other children ages are 11, 9yo aspie and an almost 6 yo who is currently being assessed for autism, hfa. Any tips, tricks, suggestions? thanks!

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Learning is the objective, where the way that we do it is rather secondary?

So given that he learns best with computer based programs, it makes sense to allow him to learn in a way that works best for him.

Perhaps you could try a shift to computer based learning for him for a while? So that you can evaluate how effective it really is for him?

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I don't restrict screen time for my Aspie/ADHD, why would I? No need to make him tense and unhappy. DS doesn't really care for fully based computer learning as much as my other kids do. But, we do a lot of group learning with a video or computer element and he enjoys that.

 

ETA: Now that he is older I do have a set of books (selections for each of several subjects) that I require him to read from daily. The key for us has been to keep each daily assignment short. So he doesn't read much on the topic, but he is expected to read about the topic every day. I usually have a history, science, and literature or grammar selection along with an "elective" or two on his stack.

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Guest purplehip

My Aspie loves computers, but I want some balance in his program, too. Here's how we've done it: we've divided our morning into specific sections. Motor time is first. We do movement and sensory activities, like swinging, yoga and movement games. This seems to help him settle in for learning. Then we do a quick morning meeting where we go over the schedule and read a short book, or a chapter from a book.Table time is next. Here, he does the traditional academics. I keep things short and sweet and he doesn't usually balk too much. Choice time is last. Here he's allowed to play computer games, but we also have other things that he loves like acting out a story, board games or tactile activities like shaving cream or painting. The trick is that he completes table time first before choice time. When he was younger, I used to give him a ticket for one hour of computer time. Now I just set the timer. If I let him, he'd spend the entire day there.

 

My child loves rules and structure. Just naming the parts of the day and creating a schedule cuts down on the whining. Another trick: we have a math and reading program on the computer, but we also use it for exploring his intense interests. Then, I tie what he's learned into a writing assignment or experiment. For example, a few days ago, he went to National Geographic and watched a movie about lizards. Then he wrote down all the facts he had learned. Sometimes we make graphs or he draws pictures. Whatever it takes. He's always pretty motivated when we tie traditional academics to what he's done on the computer. Anyway, good luck. Some days are better than others, but this works pretty well for us.

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we've eased slowly away from computer-based programs, but started heavy on them. It was a good transition to ease the boys (both of whom have various issues) in to enjoying school. the older one actually had gone through a lot of school and needed more hand-holding than electronics. the younger one did 1.5 years of mostly T4L, with some supplementation, until he finally admitted he liked what I was doing better than T4L - now, this was because he is a math-focused kid and we were reading Murderous Maths books. I go fairly unstructured with him - i mean, we have to cover math/science/history/LA every day, but most of it does not look like curriculum. they will mature and be able to handle more . . . and they may well end up working in the computer industry, so its not a tragedy

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