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Our public high school will NOT tell me what textbooks they use!


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My friend asked her dd's teacher for the name of the book they were using and not allowed to bring home so that she could tutor her dd. Nope. No deal. The teacher would not tell her.

 

At K-5 level, teachers may not use most of the assigned stuff though. They may just use their own materials. For example, below list is what my school district issue to all the districts elementary school for K-5 math

 

K-5 enVisionMATH California, Scott Foresman-Addison Weslely (2009) core

4/5 Hands-on Equations, Borenson and Associates, Inc. supplementary

4-7 (Intervention) California Fast Forward Math, Harcourt School Publishers (2008) supplementary

 

Older boy's B&M teachers use plenty of their own materials like math minutes, touch math and others that I can't remember. They skip quite a bit of enVisionMath.

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I also find it ironic that the schools in our district constantly talk about the "family-teacher partnership" at their schools. And every. single. one of the many, many mailings that go out, especially at local election time, emphasizes the "community-school" partnership! LOL Clearly, that "partnership" only extends as far as the community's purse strings.

 

Can "partnership" be a one-way relationship?

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Any update?

 

I left a voicemail for the district curriculum coordinator last Friday, but haven't heard anything back.

 

I emailed the same woman this morning asking where I could find the texts used in our district's high schools. I explained that my sons will be in 9th grade in 2014-15 and that "my husband and I are looking at the options for high school, public, private, and parochial, and one of the most basic ways to compare schools is to consider the texts they use." Hopefully that was innocuous enough. It seems like such a basic, objective question, and I don't want to antagonize them.

 

At this point, I'm more motivated by simple curiosity about how long it's going to take me and how hard it's going to be for me to find out what texts they use. It would be really interesting if they truly do not legally have to disclose the texts they use.

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At my dh's school, textbooks were being used less and less. Dh had a classroom set, but it was only pulled out and used from time to time. Most of what dh was expected to do was use power point/smart board presentations and group learning projects. He taught history, and I was surprised that the kids don't actually read much for a history class. He was teaching regular classes, not honors or AP. He did say that most of the AP classes actually issued a textbook but not the honors classes.

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At my dh's school, textbooks were being used less and less. Dh had a classroom set, but it was only pulled out and used from time to time. Most of what dh was expected to do was use power point/smart board presentations and group learning projects. He taught history, and I was surprised that the kids don't actually read much for a history class. He was teaching regular classes, not honors or AP. He did say that most of the AP classes actually issued a textbook but not the honors classes.

 

 

:confused1: I'm sitting here trying to figure out how you have a history class without much reading . . .

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:confused1: I'm sitting here trying to figure out how you have a history class without much reading . . .

 

 

Probably the same way the honors class is conducted here. Students work on a year-long independent project within their time period, while at the same time learning how the civilization they picked interacted with and affected other civilizations that different students are studying. It's a fascinating class, the way the teacher does it. The kids are constantly researching and comparing notes. Ours here borrowed several jackdaws from me to supplement their catalog of primary sources they use.

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Probably the same way the honors class is conducted here. Students work on a year-long independent project within their time period, while at the same time learning how the civilization they picked interacted with and affected other civilizations that different students are studying. It's a fascinating class, the way the teacher does it. The kids are constantly researching and comparing notes. Ours here borrowed several jackdaws from me to supplement their catalog of primary sources they use.

 

 

 

But, but . . . if they're learning about a certain civilization and constantly researching, wouldn't they have to be reading? I mean, primary sources are only helpful if you actually read them, right? The other post wasn't referring to not using a textbook, but to actually not reading much in history class. Still not seeing that.

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:confused1: I'm sitting here trying to figure out how you have a history class without much reading . . .

 

What's sad is that his classes were the regular classes and full of kids who were not performing well on tests. Reading a textbook might have actually improved their reading, vocabularies, etc. Yet administration at the school was pushing the teachers more and more to get away from using textbooks, worksheets, or lecturing. He felt they pretty much expected him to get the information into their brains by mental telepathy!

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