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Our public high school will NOT tell me what textbooks they use!


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We've been considering options for high school, including the local public brick & mortar school. I'd like my boys to be as prepared as possible to make the transition, if we go that route. They'll be in 8th grade in the fall, so I figured, if there was anything we could do to prepare w/ minimal impact on our 8th grade plans, we might as well do it.

 

I found out that a guidance counselor will NOT meet with a family or student until school starts! Ok. Seems stupid because you'd think they'd be thrilled that a family wanted their student to be prepared and to make a smooth transition, but I can deal with that.

 

Then, I called to find out what French textbook they use, so that we can use that one or a similar one next year in 8th. I talked to an assistant principal and asked where I could find an online list of the textbooks they use at this high school. "We don't publish a list." Ok. Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time." Wouldn't the student go into the next level if he knew the material well enough? "If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

 

I'm still in shock. This is the PUBLIC high school we're zoned for, and they will not tell me what texts they use?! How would I know if I wanted my student to attend that school if I don't know what they'd be studying?!

 

The reasons to continue homeschooling through high school even though it's a pain in CA just keep multiplying!

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Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time." Wouldn't the student go into the next level if he knew the material well enough? "If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

 

 

:001_huh:

 

"Thank you. We'll cross your school off our list."

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I'm still in shock. This is the PUBLIC high school we're zoned for, and they will not tell me what texts they use?! How would I know if I wanted my student to attend that school if I don't know what they'd be studying?!

 

The reasons to continue homeschooling through high school even though it's a pain in CA just keep multiplying!

 

 

I would email the French teacher directly and ask her. In my experience in dealing with the public schools, the teachers were great. The administrators, on the other hand, had me :cursing: :banghead: I think that feeling was mutual, though. :D

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The reasons to continue homeschooling through high school even though it's a pain in CA just keep multiplying!

 

 

Are you looking for just french textbooks or California's textbook list?

Most high schools have their textbook list on the school webpages

 

e.g.

http://chs.tvusd.k12.ca.us/textbooks

http://www.gunnfrench.org/

http://www.conejo.k1...nformation.aspx

Page 3 http://board.puhsd.o...ee7a76ac66c.pdf

 

ETA:

From California Dept of Education's Price List of Adopted Instructional Materials page

 

"Publisher: GLENCOE/MCGRAW-HILL

Series: Glencoe French 1: Bon voyage!

Author: Schmitt

 

Publisher: HOLT MCDOUGAL, DIVISION OF HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT (formerly Holt, Rinehart, Winston)

Series: Allez, viens! Holt French

Author: DeMado and d'Usseau

 

Publisher: HOLT MCDOUGAL, DIVISION OF HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT (formerly McDougal Littell)

Series: Discovering French, Nouveau!

Author: Valette, and others"

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:iagree: with snowbeltmom. Email the teacher directly.

 

I have done this several times. I choose a teacher from the website who is likely to know, tell them we're trying to decide on schools and we were wondering what math program they use. I have not done this for high school yet, though I plan to do so eventually. I have *always* received a response, though it might take a while. Usually, I get a response within a day or two.

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Thanks for the suggestion, Wapiti and Snowbeltmom. I'll try that.

 

(Fraidycat, I did try asking my neighbor's daughter, but she's not taking French and she hasn't followed through on asking a friend who is.)

 

Thanks for the links, Arcadia. I've seen the CA adopted texts site, but I was hoping to find out which one our specific district uses.

 

I still cannot believe a public school will not tell a parent in their district what texts they use. It's a PUBLIC school!

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Thanks for the links, Arcadia. I've seen the CA adopted texts site, but I was hoping to find out which one our specific district uses.

 

 

If you go to your school district website, under their meeting minutes, there would be a list of textbooks that are approved for use by the district. Also email the Director, Secondary Education (Departments » Educational Services Division » Curriculum and Instruction) of your school district if you can't find that information. He/She will have the list of textbooks.

 

ETA:

"Education code Section 60119

© As part of the hearing required pursuant to this section, the governing board also shall make a written determination as to whether each pupil enrolled in a foreign language or health course has sufficient textbooks or instructional materials that are consistent with the content and cycles of the curriculum frameworks adopted by the state board for those subjects." pertaining to public hearing. So the list of textbooks would be in the public hearing minutes.

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Thanks, Arcadia! I'm wading through the last 3 months of district board meeting minutes now, but haven't come across any mention of texts, yet.

 

If that doesn't work, and an email to the French teachers at our specific school doesn't work, I'll try the "Coordinator of Curriculum and Assessment" and the "Director of Educational & Special Services."

 

I'll find a way to get the info somewhere, but my biggest issue is the fact that a public school district not only does not provide a public list of the textbooks they're using but they also will not provide that information when a parent in their district specifically requests it!

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I ...asked where I could find an online list of the textbooks they use... "We don't publish a list." Ok. Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time... If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

 

... my biggest issue is the fact that a public school district not only does not provide a public list of the textbooks they're using but they also will not provide that information when a parent in their district specifically requests it!

 

 

Just a thought, but this does not bode well for dealing with ANY future issue with the school once your student starts attending...

 

Perhaps consider this an advance warning flag that this school may not be the one that will be the best fit for your family?

 

BEST of luck, whatever you decide! Warmly, Lori D.

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I'll find a way to get the info somewhere, but my biggest issue is the fact that a public school district not only does not provide a public list of the textbooks they're using but they also will not provide that information when a parent in their district specifically requests it!

 

It took me 2mins to get the information for my own school district. So weird that the assistant principal of your zoned school won't give you a copy.

 

This is where the textbook list (pdf) approved January 24, 2013 for my district is posted:

Departments » Educational Services Division » Educational Materials and Learning Resources

Instructional Resources

Board Approved Instructional Resources List

 

This is for French (C is core, S is supplement):

French 1 Bon Voyage! Level 1, Glencoe (2008) C

French 1/French 2 Le Voyage de sa Vie, Command Performance Language Institute (2011) S

French 2 Bon Voyage! Level 2, Glencoe (2008) C

French 3 Bon Voyage! Level 3, Glencoe (2008) C

French 4/AP French Language and Culture Allons au-dela!: La langue et les cultures du monde Francophone, Pearson Education, Inc. (2012) C

French 4/AP French Language and Culture French Three Years, AMSCO (1994) S

French 4/AP French Language and Culture Les Aventures du Petit Nicolas, Glencoe (1966) S

French 4/AP French Language and Culture Bon Voyage! Level 3, Glencoe (2008) S

French All Levels Harrap's French and English Pocket Dictionary, Fully Revised Edition, McGraw-Hill S

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Here's my problem with this school system....

 

.... Ok. Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time." Wouldn't the student go into the next level if he knew the material well enough? "If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

 

 

Wow! So they only want mediocre students who don't want/need to be challenged because it might mean the teacher has to think up a few out of the box ideas. I would hope the teacher would be doing this anyway. I would think the school system and parents want their children to excel.

... also "unfair advantage"? This just seems wrong. Schools should not be a competition. The kids are there to learn, so let them learn.

Just another reason to Homeschool through high school.

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If you are in California you can also look at the school report card that they have to make available to the public. It lists test score, demographics, and the adopted textbooks. Google school accountability report card and then the name of the high school. Or you can call the district office and ask for the administrator in charge of curriculum.

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Did you dig around on the district website? I'd be very surprised if texts weren't listed.

 

If you must, I agree that you should go ahead and email a French teacher at the school. My husband teaches high school math and would not hesitate to share info about the curriculum with any interested party -- especially a parent.

 

Sigh...

 

I hate hearing things like this...

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Found the French textbook info. Thanks, Arcadia!

 

(Still think all the textbooks should be listed and available to parents!)

 

Legally they are. It is on the School Accountability Report Card under section VII. My kids' zoned high school uses McDougall Littell Discovering French series except in the AP course.

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I have had the same experience in my state. First i tried the teachers. I asked over the summer for next years books and they wouldn't tell me. I even asked our asst principal. I finally reached the person in our district who told me not to buy the public school books since they were not as good as the books I could buy in bookstores. The next year I decided to homeschool. Good luck.

 

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OP's zoned high school has an unfilled table for section VII of the SARC. It is really weird.

 

Try this link that the state publishes. It is supposed to have a direct link to the school's report card. If anyone else in California wants to find what textbooks k-12 are being used at their neighborhood school this link should work.

 

http://www3.cde.ca.gov/sarcupdate/clink.aspx

 

This is the school report card template that the state tells the school districts that they must use or must provide the same information including the adopted textbooks.

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/documents/tempword12.doc

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Try this link that the state publishes. It is supposed to have a direct link to the school's report card. If anyone else in California wants to find what textbooks k-12 are being used at their neighborhood school this link should work.

 

http://www3.cde.ca.gov/sarcupdate/clink.aspx

 

If you choose Santa Clara county which is where I am, you would see that half or more of the schools did not link their SARC to the above link.

San Mateo county also have about half the schools not linked.

 

ETA:

Gunn High (Palo Alto) also does not provide that information in their SARC. A telephone number is provided instead.

Mission San Jose (Fremont) has a partial list on their SARC.

It is really YMMV.

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Try this link that the state publishes. It is supposed to have a direct link to the school's report card.

 

Not all schools provide a direct link to their SARP. If there's no direct link, one is directed to contact the school directly. Guess which my high school is? Right... no direct link.

 

That template is pretty clear that the school is supposed to provide the textbook information. I wonder why the state didn't kick it back to the school to be completed.

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I haven't read the responses, but have you checked your public library? Sometimes they have in-library copies of the texts that you can look at. And what about calling the district office over the principal's head? You might get more answers there as well.

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Why in the world would you ask a stupid question like that anyway? This is the PUBLIC SCHOOL here, the best school possible for your child, so just shut up and put 'em on the bus already! You should just KNOW because this is public school that your child will be educated by professionals to the highest standards and you certainly are not qualified to know the details. Oh, and make sure you pay those property taxes promptly and get going on those PTA fundraisers.

 

(Geez, parents! I hate it when they act like they think they know something! This lady should go get a teaching degree and twenty years experience in the classroom before she dares to have an opinion on what we do, and until then she needs to shut up and let us educate her kid the right way without interfering in the process.)

 

 

:banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

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Yup. These are the responses I have gotten every time I was seeking information about our local public schools. And every single time I just told myself that obviously these people have no interest in my students. We still homeschool.

 

Fwiw, homeschooling highschool does not need to be difficult. This depends entirely on the options you choose to do so. If you'd like to chat more about this you are welcome to send me an e-mail. :001_smile:

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I emailed the principal of the junior high here asking about their math sequence, and got no reply. nothing. nada.

 

 

In their defense, in our area secondary schools (grades 7-12) have 3,000-4,000 students and the administration probably has a pretty full plate. I'm an admissions liaison officer for my alma mater. It took me several emails to get the guidance office at the local high school to respond to my emails. (And I'm basically the gateway for students to get a full ride scholarship.)

 

I'm not saying it's a good way to do business. I'm saying that they may well have dozens to hundreds of phone calls and emails each day that require a response. They are dealing with lawsuits over who is placed in gifted programs, breaking up fights, trying to cope with student bodies that range from extremely gifted to very at risk, and may also have to work with potential in school bullying, violence, alcohol and drug use and suicide. One local high school has had three young men kill themself - just this year.

 

The comments about not wanting a student to work ahead are pretty outrageous. But there are a lot of fires for a public school administrator to try to put out during the day. Queries about textbooks probably fall rather low on the priority list.

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Queries about textbooks probably fall rather low on the priority list.

 

Totally agree.

 

And the obvious solution is to post the list or make it publicly available somewhere. If it is not publicly available, the administration is going to have to expect to field requests for the information.

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Totally agree.

 

And the obvious solution is to post the list or make it publicly available somewhere. If it is not publicly available, the administration is going to have to expect to field requests for the information.

 

I'll agree that if there are centralized textbook selections and if disclosure is required by the state, this should be available.

 

However, this isn't universally the case. When my SIL taught elementary in the midwest, there wasn't a standard handwriting curriculum across just one grade in one school. Each teacher was able to teach what they thought best. There were district adoptions for other subjects like language arts. But it does vary.

 

What I don't see in it is a disdain for homeschoolers in particular.

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In their defense, in our area secondary schools (grades 7-12) have 3,000-4,000 students and the administration probably has a pretty full plate. I'm an admissions liaison officer for my alma mater. It took me several emails to get the guidance office at the local high school to respond to my emails. (And I'm basically the gateway for students to get a full ride scholarship.)

 

 

 

I get what you are saying, but our junior high has 450 students in 6-8, and the whole population of the town is only 11,000. If you decide to send your kid out of district (or homeschool), you get a personal phone call from the Superintendent who will try and talk you out of your choice. But they can't respond to an email with an inquiry about their math sequence? Or post any useful info on their website, for parents? A lot of parents here, who have been very involved in their kid's elementary school, find that once they send their kids to junior high, it's like sending them into a black hole. They are told that they aren't needed as on-campus volunteers, because "the kids don't like having parents around." It's really disconcerting to run into a brick wall when you try and interact with your child's school.

 

Parent's financial contributions are most welcome, of course. ;)

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It sounds like OP's high school is in a really competitive area where parents do have their kids study the textbooks for future classes in the summer. I went to high school in Southern California and had many friends whose parents were born in Korea. Many had the teachers' edition of the textbooks at home. So for example, while the student textbook had only the answers to the even numbered problems, they had access to all the answers. They still had to work out the solution to get the answer though. Their parents made sure that the homework was completed and 100% correct. a couple friends had completed every problem in the book before school started with the help of tutors. So when they were in class it was just a review for them. I feel they earned their A+ because they did work hard. I guess this is what the high school is trying to prevent but I can't see it really working since a motivated parent who has time to investigate will find a way to figure out what textbooks are being used.

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Their parents made sure that the homework was completed and 100% correct. a couple friends had completed every problem in the book before school started with the help of tutors. .............. I guess this is what the high school is trying to prevent but I can't see it really working since a motivated parent who has time to investigate will find a way to figure out what textbooks are being used.

 

Actually the private tutors here would have the teacher's edition of the textbooks for all the nearby schools and have no problem giving summer intensive private tuition. On a comically note, I'll just need to hang out at certain libraries to figure out what textbooks are used by the high school study groups there or just "bribe" a local high school kid for that information.

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What I don't see in it is a disdain for homeschoolers in particular.

 

I don't think homeschooling is a factor in this issue at all. They don't release the names of the textbooks to anybody. Students and their families find out in August when they are handed their textbooks for the year.

 

My issue in all this is that it is a public institution, a public high school. By law, they can only use state-approved textbooks. I would have expected a public school to be obliged to publicly disclose exactly which textbooks they use.

 

It's my first real interaction with the public school system, and the fact that I can't even find out what textbook they use for one class really surprised me. How could a parent decide whether to send a child to this public school or to look for another option (private/parochial/home school) if they can't look up the texts that child will be using?

 

ETA: They also do not allow 8th graders to "shadow" a 9th grader for a day, nor do they allow parents to visit/observe any classes.

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That's a lot different response than what I've gotten from my school district. I worked with the guidance counselor for a least six months prior to my kids attending school.

 

This is what I was hoping for, but it's stated clearly in a FAQ on the school's website that guidance counselors "would be glad to meet with the student or the family after the first day of school." The assistant principal told me exactly the same thing and that there are no exceptions.

 

You are very fortunate to have that support ahead of time!

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It sounds like OP's high school is in a really competitive area where parents do have their kids study the textbooks for future classes in the summer. I went to high school in Southern California and had many friends whose parents were born in Korea. Many had the teachers' edition of the textbooks at home. So for example, while the student textbook had only the answers to the even numbered problems, they had access to all the answers. They still had to work out the solution to get the answer though. Their parents made sure that the homework was completed and 100% correct. a couple friends had completed every problem in the book before school started with the help of tutors. So when they were in class it was just a review for them. I feel they earned their A+ because they did work hard. I guess this is what the high school is trying to prevent but I can't see it really working since a motivated parent who has time to investigate will find a way to figure out what textbooks are being used.

 

 

The comment the op got about not wanting kids to have an unfair advantage is ridiculous to the extreme and I would challenge that on up over her head. A student with an advantage can only be a good thing.....for the student and the schools standardized test scores. What an idiotic thing to say.

 

And yes I agree with the post that I quoted....kids who spend the summer studying deserve their good grades....who could find fault with that except jealous people.

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Many of my HS teachers would have had trouble answering this question because they didn't use a textbook. They'd put together their own materials from many different sources over 10-20 years work. I know Physics, Chemistry, Algebra 1 & 2, Accounting, and possibly French 3 were this way. We never had a text for any of my history or english courses - ever.

 

But if they did have a text (Biology, Geometry, PreCalc), they'd let you come in during the summer and work on it all you wanted as long as you didn't remove it from the building or write in it. My mom got me access to computers in the summer before I was old enough to be a student there so I could teach myself typing, Basic, and TurboPascal.

 

I agree with PP (Lori D!) that this might be your biggest indication of what working with this school would be like in the future ... and steer clear!

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Try looking at teachers' websites to find titles (or even just hints, like chapter names).

 

All teacher/class websites are only accessible through a password protected gateway. You must be a current student/family/school staff member to get a password.

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The reasons to continue homeschooling through high school even though it's a pain in CA just keep multiplying!

 

Now you've got me worried... :confused1: :confused1:

 

Why is high school a pain to homeschool in CA? I ask because we'll be there in a couple of years.

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That's a lot different response than what I've gotten from my school district. I worked with the guidance counselor for a least six months prior to my kids attending school.

 

As far as text books, I have found they are used more as a resource if the students need to look something up rather than the primary source of the lesson.

 

 

A friend of mine had her kids take math and Spanish at the local high school. there was no Spanish text. The kids were supposed to learn everything by taking notes in class. Maybe they don't want to admit they aren't using a textbook?

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However, this isn't universally the case. When my SIL taught elementary in the midwest, there wasn't a standard handwriting curriculum across just one grade in one school. Each teacher was able to teach what they thought best. There were district adoptions for other subjects like language arts. But it does vary.

 

California funds schools at the state level rather than at the district level (with a handful of "grandfathered" districts, mostly in very wealthy communities). Any textbook that is purchased with state-funded money has to be on the approved textbook list. Now teachers will often supplement the official textbook, but the SARC is supposed to list the names of the official textbooks used in the particular school under section VII.

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Why is high school a pain to homeschool in CA? I ask because we'll be there in a couple of years.

 

Whether or not it is a pain depends on the student's post-graduation plans. State residents who wish to attend a UC or CSU school must complete specific courses approved by the UC Regents. Now it is possible to get around these requirements by completing an associate's degree at a community college and then applying as a transfer student. I know a bunch of folks who go this route because it offers more flexibility. However, my DH would never in a million years agree to that, so I will have to make sure that whatever we decide to do for high school will meet the UC requirements.

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All teacher/class websites are only accessible through a password protected gateway. You must be a current student/family/school staff member to get a password.

 

Nope, definitely not! That may be the way it SHOULD be, but I have gotten access to dozens upon dozens of class web sites that are not intended for the public. Sometimes they lack a sign-in altogether; other times, there is a sign-in on the home page, but if you google phrases that so happen to lead to a different page, you're in. Then, you can frequently figure out your way to other pages simply by noting the way the page is titled and changing the address bar accordingly. Sometimes you have to guess at what other pages might be included; other times they are referenced on whatever page you are on.

 

I have even come across the user name and password to various class resources that the district pays for, like online labs and activities.

 

Most schools do not understand internet security at all. I don't have any nefarious intentions, but if your security is that lacking, I will poke around if your site is interesting.

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Whether or not it is a pain depends on the student's post-graduation plans. State residents who wish to attend a UC or CSU school must complete specific courses approved by the UC Regents. Now it is possible to get around these requirements by completing an associate's degree at a community college and then applying as a transfer student. I know a bunch of folks who go this route because it offers more flexibility. However, my DH would never in a million years agree to that, so I will have to make sure that whatever we decide to do for high school will meet the UC requirements.

 

 

Yes, the a through g courses are the standard way, but the UC also offers

 

Admission by Examination

 

http://admission.uni...ts/examination/

 

Admission by Exception

 

http://admission.uni...tion/index.html

 

The webpage for the latter specifically mentions homeschoolers.

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I'll find a way to get the info somewhere, but my biggest issue is the fact that a public school district not only does not provide a public list of the textbooks they're using but they also will not provide that information when a parent in their district specifically requests it!

 

I would contact the Superintendent of your School District with a complaint. Then you should get action quickly.

 

Bill

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<snip>

Then, I called to find out what French textbook they use, so that we can use that one or a similar one next year in 8th. I talked to an assistant principal and asked where I could find an online list of the textbooks they use at this high school. "We don't publish a list." Ok. Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time." Wouldn't the student go into the next level if he knew the material well enough? "If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

<snip>

 

 

Born and grew up in California and I believe the Assistant Principal should be disciplined, for telling you that. Absurd...

 

I certainly hope you would not have gotten the same response, if you were in Texas. The State of Texas usually has 2 or 3 textbooks approved for a subject. The local school districts can choose which of those textbooks they want to use. It is not a "state secret" for you to get this information. You are a taxpayer... It should not be considered "SECRET" information by the Assistant Principal or your local school district. Sounds like that school should be eliminated from your consideration, based on the lack of information they are providing to you. Quality education is probably not going to be something the children there receive, based on what the Assistant Principal told you.

 

If CA is like TX, they probably use the same series of textbooks, for the same subject, throughout the high school years.

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I get what you are saying, but our junior high has 450 students in 6-8, and the whole population of the town is only 11,000. If you decide to send your kid out of district (or homeschool), you get a personal phone call from the Superintendent who will try and talk you out of your choice. But they can't respond to an email with an inquiry about their math sequence? Or post any useful info on their website, for parents? A lot of parents here, who have been very involved in their kid's elementary school, find that once they send their kids to junior high, it's like sending them into a black hole. They are told that they aren't needed as on-campus volunteers, because "the kids don't like having parents around." It's really disconcerting to run into a brick wall when you try and interact with your child's school.

 

Parent's financial contributions are most welcome, of course. ;)

 

Well I have definitely encountered this attitude too. There are always schools or people in schools who seem to think that parental support means parents do what they are told, without asking questions.

 

My area has highly educated, highly involved, type A parents. There was a strong revolt during the last school board election with a number of parents running for their first election because they felt strongly about things the schools were or were not doing. Several of the reform candidates were elected.

 

Yet even here, it took over a month for a friend to get a hard copy of the algebra text for his son (who was not doing well with the etext online).

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We've been considering options for high school, including the local public brick & mortar school. I'd like my boys to be as prepared as possible to make the transition, if we go that route. They'll be in 8th grade in the fall, so I figured, if there was anything we could do to prepare w/ minimal impact on our 8th grade plans, we might as well do it.

 

I found out that a guidance counselor will NOT meet with a family or student until school starts! Ok. Seems stupid because you'd think they'd be thrilled that a family wanted their student to be prepared and to make a smooth transition, but I can deal with that.

 

Then, I called to find out what French textbook they use, so that we can use that one or a similar one next year in 8th. I talked to an assistant principal and asked where I could find an online list of the textbooks they use at this high school. "We don't publish a list." Ok. Can I just get the name of the text or the publisher of the series used for French? "We don't give out the names of our textbooks. It might give a student an unfair advantage if he studied it ahead of time." Wouldn't the student go into the next level if he knew the material well enough? "If he had too strong a foundation, the teacher would have to bring in supplemental materials to challenge him, and our teachers have so many students that they don't have time for that."

 

I'm still in shock. This is the PUBLIC high school we're zoned for, and they will not tell me what texts they use?! How would I know if I wanted my student to attend that school if I don't know what they'd be studying?!

 

The reasons to continue homeschooling through high school even though it's a pain in CA just keep multiplying!

 

 

That's so ridiculous. My daughter was in a charter, so I just emailed all the teachers to ask what was used. They all were forthcoming. (Not thrilled with the material!).

 

They do not know what to do with cogs who don't fit into the proper holes. The charter tried, putting my then-13 year old daughter in with juniors for her best subject, and it was still far too easy for her. I ended up purchasing some of the books she needed because the school said it wouldn't be sending any books home (what??? How can you do Chemistry without a book to read??). Many won't make any effort at all, and this school's representative has just told you that this school is one of them. They don't want to tell you what they use because they don't want to hear what you might have to say about it.

 

Run!

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I certainly hope you would not have gotten the same response, if you were in Texas.

 

Well, actually, I have a friend whose kids are in public school. Her dd was having trouble with math class and her grade had dropped to a B (in first grade, so my friend was quite concerned). My friend asked her dd's teacher for the name of the book they were using and not allowed to bring home so that she could tutor her dd. Nope. No deal. The teacher would not tell her. Of course, I think the teacher disliked both my friend and her dd, so she took every opportunity to mess them around. You are at the mercy of the teacher and administrators if you enroll in ps and it's very hard to fight the system if you think you're getting a raw deal.

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I imagine if you just look up what the large textbook publishers have for French you'd find a book that would work

 

Yes, I can easily find a text to use. My issue is that the school is a public institution and the texts they use to do their publicly mandated job should be publicly available. I wouldn't think something so fundamental as what texts they use should be such closely guarded information! Wouldn't you think they would be legally required to make such basic information available, at least when asked directly for it?

 

 

I did call and leave a voicemail for the district's "Coordinator of Curriculum and Assessment" last Friday asking where I could find out what texts are used in the district's schools, but I haven't heard back. I guess now I'm just curious about whether I'll be able to get the information anywhere or if I'll be foiled on all fronts.

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