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Is there a math curriculum like the "Key To Series...."?


northcoast
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DD is almost 11. She's disliking Singapore Math 5A & 5B. We've supplemented with "Key To Fractions" and "Decimals" which she really liked. She says she can understand from their pictures/drawings better than Singapore. I think she wants to do things are her own as she doesn't always seem to "get things" if spoken like when I try to explain stuff. But if reading or seeing pictures, she seems to get that easier. She can grasp things very quickly if presented in the right way. I just have to find that way. :) She doesn't seem to like details or a lot of rules but is artsy and creative. And, sigh, she has a former accountant for a mother. So is there anything out there like "Key To.." for math? Thanks!

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Uhm.

The Keys To... Series are math supplements/workbooks/curriculua.

Here is the link to the home page

If she is doing really well, with those books, I would just buy her the series. They cover pretty much all of the material typically found in 4th-8th grade math. If your DD has math facts, counting, place value and basic operations down, then I would have her work through the whole Key To Series for her 6th/7th grade year and then, give her a few placement tests to see where she is at.

Or better yet, just don't put a grade on it. Just do the Key to Books as quickly as she is comfortable doing them, but I would probably insist she do the whole set.

 

Fractions (4 books)

Decimals (4 books)

Percents (3 books)

Measurement (4 books (you can get the customary or metric versions))

Algebra (10 books) -- Covers a good deal of what most people call Algebra 1

Geometry (8 books)

If you are thinking of switching to a more topical workbook approach for your DD, I think I would go with Keys To first, because I assume they are more explicit and include more practice and then use the Number Power series to solidify anything if she needed additional practice with a skill she was familiar with already.

 

the Number Power series published by Contemporary Books, I own a couple of these and I like them, they are the only reason I haven't yet bought the Keys to Series. I think that if I had a student who needed more practice with anything from the Keys to...series, I would probably have them do the Number Power books or find worksheets online.

 

Number Power series contains the following books:

NP 1: Addtion, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division

NP 2: Fractions, Decimals and Percents

NP 3: Algebra

NP 4: Geometry

NP 5: Graphs, Tables, Schedules and Maps

NP 6: Word Problems

NP 7: Problem Solving and Test Taking Strategies

NP 8: Analyzing Data

NP 9: Measurement

NP R: Review Whole Numbers to Algebra

Calculator Power: The Complete Handbook

 

The newer NP book series includes titles on the following, but I have never seen these last 3 in person I have seen the above ones and I liked them.

 

PreAlgebra,

Transition Math and

Financial Literacy

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I didn't realize that Key To... series covered everything in 4th-8th grade math. Thanks for the thought! I'll take a look at link.

 

I should also mention she seems to need lots for practice for concepts to stick which is why we started Key To... after doing something in Singapore.

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I didn't realize that Key To... series covered everything in 4th-8th grade math. Thanks for the thought! I'll take a look at link.

 

I should also mention she seems to need lots for practice for concepts to stick which is why we started Key To... after doing something in Singapore.

See my post, I edited it.

 

Anyway, if she needs more practice, then I would have her use Keys To...as the teaching set and Number Power for the reviewing set.

How close is she to finishing Singapore 5A/5B? You may want to switch over as soon as you're done with Singapore 5 (maybe start them up this summer?) and just work through at what ever pace your daughter can manage?

 

I found it was much easier for me to understand a concept, then practice/drill the proceedure and then use that basic mastery to go back and apply what I had learned to various problems. Its the only thing that worked for me and it really helped me to get a deeper understanding of the why behind the how. The theory part of math made almost no-sense to me when I was younger.

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Wow. I was just going to ask a similar question. My almost 11 year old is just moving soooo slow with Singapore. We are still on level 4. I have some Key to Series books and he does so much better with them. I was just going to ask about using those as his main math curriculum. I was thinking I could use those with the Singapore math word problems, mental math, and then add in some warm ups for practicing multiplication/division. I just was not sure if I was nuts. Haha. I think this post may be the sign I needed :)

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