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nrself

AOPS sequence through high school

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If you're using AOPS, what sequence have you used/are planning? e.g. 7th grade pre-algebra, then what? They have so many different courses I'm wondering what people are able to finish in high school.

 

Thanks!

Nicole

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We have done the following with DD:

7th grade: Intro to Algebra (entire book)

9th grade (she skipped 8th): Geometry

10th grade Intermediate Algebra + Precalculus

11th grade Calculus

sadly we are out of AoPS math now for 12th, sigh

 

DS:

6th: Intro to Algebra ch 1-13

7th: Intro to Algebra ch. 14-16 + Counting&Probability

8th Intro to Algebra ch. 17-22 + Geometry ch. 1-?

planned: Finish Geometry/ start Intermediate Algebra in 9th

 

ETA: We are using only the books, not the online classes.

The pre-algebra book did not exist when we needed it.

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Pre-algebra was not available for my oldest (now in 10th) and middle (8th grade). They did the following:

 

Oldest

He completed the following online courses in 6th-8th grade:

Introduction to Algebra (now called Alg. I and Alg II)

Introduction to Number Theory

Introduction to Counting & Probability

Introduction to Geometry

Intermediate Algebra (now called Alg III)

 

9th grade: Pre-calc

 

10th grade (currently) AP Calc BC

 

11th grade: AoPS Calc and Intermediate C & P

 

12th grade: Linear algebra, multi-variable calc

 

Middle:

My current 8th grader does not take the online classes because they move too quickly for him. He has completed all the introductory level books but geometry, which he will complete by the end of next month. He will begin Alg. III in 9th grade, and most likely will not get to calc until 11th grade.

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sadly we are out of AoPS math now for 12th, sigh

 

You may want to consider AoPS's discrete math books. My son found the C&P extremely useful in his genetics class.

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You may want to consider AoPS's discrete math books. My son found the C&P extremely useful in his genetics class.

 

Thanks for the suggestion - but for her coursework in physics, we need multivariable calculus and differential equations.

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So if I am understand this correctly the Intro to Algebra book actually contains what would be called Algebra 1 & 2?

My DD would start Pre-Alg in 7th grade. Based on some of the examples above I have formulated the following schedule. Would this be doable or should the Intro to Algebra be split and intro to C & P and # Theory but used as breaks from the Intro to algebra course?

 

7th: Pre-algebra

8th: Intro to Algebra

9th: Intro to C& P and # Theory

10th: Intro to Geometry

11th: Intermediate Algebra

12th: Pre-Calc

 

We will also only be using the books unless we find that we cannot continue with out professional help.

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So if I am understand this correctly the Intro to Algebra book actually contains what would be called Algebra 1 & 2?

 

Yes, that is correct. The traditional algebra 1 content is about chapters 1-13.

My DD would start Pre-Alg in 7th grade. Based on some of the examples above I have formulated the following schedule. Would this be doable or should the Intro to Algebra be split and intro to C & P and # Theory but used as breaks from the Intro to algebra course?

 

7th: Pre-algebra

8th: Intro to Algebra

9th: Intro to C& P and # Theory

10th: Intro to Geometry

11th: Intermediate Algebra

12th: Pre-Calc

 

We will also only be using the books unless we find that we cannot continue with out professional help.

 

Looks good, but one year for Intro to Algebra may or may not work. Intro to Algebra is a very big text. Some students can accomplish it in one year in its entirety (my DD worked through the summer to finish), others would benefit from going slower or taking a break with some other math. You have to see how it goes with your students; I do not believe in rushing math just in order to adhere to some schedule.

Also, some kid may be interested in C&P and number theory, some only in one of the two, some in neither. You may find you are going slower and need two years for Intro to Algebra, which would be perfectly fine, too.

Consider the schedule as tentative, keep an open mind, and be prepared to adjust to your student's pace.

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Based on some of the examples above I have formulated the following schedule. Would this be doable or should the Intro to Algebra be split and intro to C & P and # Theory but used as breaks from the Intro to algebra course?

 

We will also only be using the books unless we find that we cannot continue with out professional help.

 

 

Yes, the Introduction to Algebra book contains both Alg I and Alg II.

 

In my experience with my three kids, it can be difficult for me to plan out a schedule years in advance, especially when they are younger and just starting with AoPS. My dd is 12 and I really am not sure where she will be in the AoPS series at the start of high school.

 

Both of my boys worked through the Introduction to Algebra book and then moved on to the other books at the introductory level. I am taking a different approach with my dd because, unlike her brothers, she "hit a wall" 1/2 way through chapter 9 in the algebra book (and also could not complete some problems in chapters 6 and 7). She is now working through the Number Theory, C&P and Geometry book simultaneously. For example, she completed chapter 1 in NT, chapter 1 in C&P, chapter 1 in Geometry and then went back to the NT book and repeated the process. She has been doing this for the last couple of months and it has been working out well for her. Once she completes the NT and C&P books, I am hoping that she will have matured enough to get back to the Introduction to Algebra book. I plan on saving the last 1/2 of the geometry book for last.

 

Also, with regards to the NT and C&P books, I am not sure if my oldest will ever use the knowledge he acquired studying number theory. If I saw that my child was not going to be able to make it through all of the AoPS books, personally, I would skip the number theory book.

 

However, my middle child is interested in computers, so I would not skip NT with him as I think he will find that knowledge useful in his later studies.

 

My younger son and daughter also study math year round.

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Like snowbeltmom, I've determined I cannot plan an AoPS sequence ahead of time for dd. She loves math, enjoys math competitions, likes to read about math, and thinks being a cryptologist would be awesome.

 

Dd began homeschooling in fifth grade. We used a mishmash of math that year, including parts of a schooly PreAlgebra textbook. She started AoPS in sixth grade.

 

6th: PreAlgebra, Intro to Algebra (ch 1-4)

7th (current): Intro to Algebra (ch 5-14), Intro to Counting & Probability, Geometry (as the online course, her first)

 

So she'll be through Geometry by September as the class runs 24 weeks March-September. For 8th grade I have planned for her to finish the Intro to Algebra book and do Intro to Number Theory. She says she wants to take another class as soon as Geometry finishes-----we'll have to see what is scheduled when.

 

If she continues with the online classes, she may go through the topics more rapidly than if she were just to use the books. The classes move FAST and have a high workload (if you also do the problems in the book, which is highly recommended). The trick will be to have the class schedule mesh with her life schedule. Some of the higher level classes aren't offered regularly.

 

There are plenty of books/classes remaining for dd----Algebra 3, PreCalc, Calc (read the course description on the website!), Intermediate C&P, Intermediate Number Theory, Olympiad Geometry, Group Theory----and the contest prep classes... I think she'll be set for awhile :)

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Thank you for all your answers. I will be aware of DD pacing. I guess the C & P courses and # Theory threw me off as I was not sure where they fit. I like to plan but am very flexible when it comes down to implementation.

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FWIW, I would treat C&P and NT as electives. I would not completely interrupt the normal math sequence for them (e.g. for all of 9th as above) if doing so would prevent a very strong math student from reaching calc in 12th. If the student is interested, I would do them on the side, during summers, etc., at the same time as regular math.

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I guess the C & P courses and # Theory threw me off as I was not sure where they fit. I like to plan but am very flexible when it comes down to implementation.

 

Those courses are wonderful math but will not be a prerequisite for any of the other math courses your student is expected to take in high school. So, they can be fit in anywhere. They are useful if your student wants something different and a break form the regular sequence or if a young student needs more time before being mature enough to continue in the normal progression - or if you have a kid who eats up math and simply wants more.

But if you have no time, or if the student has no interest, they can be omitted.

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FWIW, I would treat C&P and NT as electives. I would not completely interrupt the normal math sequence for them (e.g. for all of 9th as above) if doing so would prevent a very strong math student from reaching calc in 12th. If the student is interested, I would do them on the side, during summers, etc., at the same time as regular math.

 

I would agree.

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If your child is going to be a math major I suggest taking the Number Theory and

Counting and Probability courses, even if you don't get to Calculus during your

senior year.

You can always start Calculus in college (even for an engineering major) and do

very well.

What you should not neglect is your Algebra I and II skills. You can't do anything

without those.

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