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Do you have *enough* curriculum and materials?


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By that I mean, do you think you have enough to homeschool for some time without having to buy more, and yet you still get more?

 

This was a recent discussion between my dh and I. I couldn't really understand why he was being grumpy that I spent 12 dollars during the recent Scholastic dollar sale. Turns out it wasn't the $12 he was grumpy about, but according to him the homeschool "stuff" is taking over the house, and I "certainly have enough now."

 

So I started to think about it. Really think about it.

 

I do try to buy things that can be used with multiple ages and I do plan on using certain books again and again when my youngers are ready for them, but I can't turn down opportunities to supplement, enrich, enliven, things.

 

So who is in the same boat? When I look at all the books/programs, for all subjects (except foreign language which I feel we're lacking big time), on my shelf, and stored on my computer, and bookmarked from a free resource online, printed out and spiral bound or put in carefully organized binders etc.....maybe he has a point. :svengo:

 

I could conceivably homeschool my 2 year old up to 5th grade without buying anything but school supplies and project materials and a few consumable workbooks.

 

But will I? :rofl: Nooo I'll buy something. I'll find it used, at a garage sale, in a consignment shop, online for free, or (holy good deal Batman) for a $1.

 

Okay I mean this thread to be sort of light-hearted. Anyone else?

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Yes, I have enough that I could stop buying materials and could teach all 4 kids up through graduation but I won't stop buying materials because new great stuff is always available. And just because I have stuff for a certain subject here does not mean it is the best fit for a given child any given year. If I could not get more I could use it and be okay but why only be okay when I can get something else that works better for that child? Plus I love to shop and buying things for school doesn't count towards being a shop-a-holic because it is for their futures and all that....right? right?

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I could homeschool through high school without buying anything else. I posted in a thread yesterday that I thought I could except for science, but then last night I was looking at my book selection on my Kindle, and I have the CK-12 textbooks for high school science. This doesn't mean I won't buy anything else; sometimes I want a change or my boys need something else, but if our income went kaput and my budget went to nothing, I could make it just fine.

 

I didn't think I'd buy much this year, but then I decided that after 9 years of doing the 4 year world history cycle, I wanted to do more of an American History focus, so that increased what I purchased by quite a bit. I don't tend to get swayed by the extras/bonus/enrichment items anymore, though (well, the Prufrock Press clearance sale got me)--I got tired of them taunting me from the shelves.

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Well, you know how much I have! But I buy almost exclusively used and actually don't spend *that* much, considering I am educating 4 (almost 5) very different kids. What I have for one kid doesn't always work for the next. But it might for another kid down the line, kwim? I'm sure what I have would be ridiculous if I only had one kid, but I have 5, so I figure it's not unreasonable.. ;). And yes, I'll keep buying. Because kids and abilities change, lifestyle changes, and kids grow older. I think I could educate them on less than we have, but not as well either because it would be less fun, or because it wouldn't fit their educational needs. One of the best parts of homeschooling, to me, is being able to customize a child's curricula.

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Assuming that I had access to the internet, printer, library, and notebook paper, I could probably teach my kids through graduation with what we have now. It would require far more work than I'm willing to put in unless I absolutely had to, but I could do it.

 

For example, we've got copies of DH's old high school math & college textbooks but not the TM's or Solution manuals. I could teach from them if I had to, but it would require me and/or DH to work through the answers to the problems not in the back.

 

I would also have to go through DD's completed Singapore math books and copy the problems onto notebook paper for DS to solve. I could do that in a pinch, but I'm not planning on it.

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Yes, I have enough to possibly finish homeschooling, with the exception of foreign language. Will I? No, because I've purchased a ton of books (quite possibly a literal amount) at thrift stores and library sales over the years. Some I use for reference, some for planning, some to preview. I haven't spent a huge amount of money because I don't have it.

 

Homeschooling does take over our house. We've always had a dedicated classroom and the book amounts have grown over the years. I've also downsized a lot and will do so more after ds graduates. I'm also building my personal library collection along the way. Our house just looks differently than it did before homeschooling. We have more books, books are in the pantry (really high school, bad for food, good for books).

 

Dh is a carpenter. He has a whole garage of tools. He's always understood about the proper tool for the job, same applies to homeschooling.

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I can't imagine buying enough to be able to get through high school. I don't think that far in advance. I actually haven't decided if I will homeschool high school. So to 8th grade is as far as I have considered for curriculum plans. I sort of do have to get all "new" things each year for my oldest ds. But then I have those materials and I think "well just use them again with my younger two." I understand about different kids needing different things. I guess I think that's why I look for the extra supplementation, to give me options to to lively up some curric that may not be as fun for this kid as that one.

 

Example; My oldest learned to read painlessly. I didn't need much. But my 5 year old (6 this summer) is showing me that he needs games, hands-on activities, projects, phonics manipulatives etc. No just sitting down quietly and contentedly and learning to read for him. Learning to read is very much an active sport! LOL

 

Maybe it's just that I get spread thin between the 3 of them and the house etc that I want some other brain to think up the activities for me. I like seeing that my kid needs such and such and knowing I have a book that had some ideas for that, instead of making it up on my own.

 

I also don't want homeschooling to be routine and boring for them. Any thing I buy I do at least scrutinize it closely to find it's usefulness. I have used all or parts of everything I own, so there's that. As I told dh, I'm not an impulsive buyer. ;)

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I have a ton of stuff that I've picked up for free here and there. I don't know about everything all the way through high school, but quite a lot. I'm pretty sure I could get all the way through high school without spending any more if you take into account free resources online.

 

But it's a total hodgepodge, and not necessarily the materials I *want* to be using.

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Most of us have "enough" kitchen tools, but it's unlikely we will never buy another pan or cookie cutter or appliance.

 

Anyone with a career or hobby constantly self-educates and buys. As time goes on, the purchases become fewer and more selective, but they continue.

 

It's okay to establish a storage and financial budget, but a total ban on purchases isn't fair.

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I will never have enough, until all the walls are lined with bookshelves, and all the furniture is in the middle of the rooms. Then I might turn all the book shelves sideways back to back, like library rows so I can fit some more.

 

My husband doesn't mind at all. As long as no bookshelves are in the garage, that is his domain.

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Well, I'm up to two big suitcases of stuff to take to my homeschool group's sale, and that's just material that we've already used that DD is beyond or unlikely to use again (while I LOVE children's books, I simply can't keep every book I love from the AO and SL book lists, so I'm cleaning out most of years 1-4 and cores 1-4) It's just plain a lot of stuff. I pulled 12 Signing time DVDs off the back of the DVD rack. I'm pretty sure no one has watched them for at least 2 years. Hopefully someone else can use them.

 

And I wish I could legally give away all those e-books. DD simply doesn't need the lower grades ones anymore.

 

I doubt I have enough to even get through the next year, though-DD goes in leaps and bounds, so I've learned not to buy in advance.

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I keep trying to slow down our acquisition. I definitely don't have enough for math for the future, so I would have to buy that - in fact, we finished most of what I had for this year and had to just buy and re-evaluate that in the last couple of weeks. Other than math though, yes, I have *enough* according to my own vision to take us through the next couple of years at least. The thing is - just like you, Iris - I know I'll get more.

 

On the flip side, I don't have younger kids and I just parted with a bunch of stuff. I listed on my local list all kinds of things like my Peggy Kaye books and the last ETC book that one of mine didn't get to, and so forth for a dollar or two each and someone bought it all. So that's good that I can clean out as well - we're not going to be taken over or anything.

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:smilielol5:

Sorry but that is a funny question...enough curriculum? Really?

But in all serious...yes. Yes I do. I can at this moment never buy any more curriculum (that actually hurt to type) except for 12th grade civics/economics, Physics, and Pre Calculus/Trig and those I can get at the library (they have want I want to use).

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No. Our oldest is just getting ready to begin first grade. We have three more kids coming up behind him, including one with special needs. We have a lot of materials and books already, but I don't think we'd be able to take care of all four kids all the way through high school at this point unless we did a real bare bones program. High school would have to be based entirely off of our Great Books set.

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:smilielol5: NEVER!

 

I have five full math programs (but only up to Gr. 4), two full writing programs plus add-ons, three grammar programs plus add-ons, two handwriting programs, two science programs plus extras, three languages on the go, three art book / programs.

 

I do only have one history program and one spelling program; clearly I've shown some remarkable restraint there.

 

And I'm still looking for some things to make next year just "perfect." :leaving:

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Easily, I have enough resources to give my kids a stellar, complete education for grades K-8 (minus replacement math, logic, and grammar workbooks). This gives me a great sense of peace and security. My books and curricula are like woobies to me. :lol:

 

It is time for me to begin parting with what they have grown out of though. I plan to keep the cream of the crop for grandkids, but the rest will go.

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I probably have enough to do to 3rd grade. Kinda. Perhaps stretching it a lot I could make it through to about 6th.

 

But I don't really look beyond the current stage much. And if I stretched it out, the kids would go through 3 different math programs to get there (1st rightstart, then Miquon, then Math Mammoth), I would have to make the geography stuff I have a bit more difficult, find some sort of free grammar program to last till 6th, and clobber together some sort of cursive writing program.

 

What I am saying was it would be doable till then, but some parts would be missing and other parts would be all over the place, and the final bits would be jumping from thing to thing.

 

Besides, if everything goes well, all I need for next year (2014) apart from the kids electives are new TM & Workbook for RS, next level of Dancing Bears, and if far enough along, Apples & Pears for spelling. If it doesn't go well, well, that'll be more expensive and make hubby sad. poor sad panda. lol.

 

In a nutshell, we really only need upto 8th grade (we have to be in a program for 10th & 12th, so they'll start working on 10th grade stuff to pass the yr10 in grade 9, to give them time to also follow their interests thats not boring companies texts), so I am sure, with a bit of finangling I could do it. The curriculum itself wouldn't be pretty though, and wouldn't be the best choice of stuff for them.

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That's a tough one. Technically, if circumstances prevented buying anymore AND I had access to printing & local library, then I could. I wouldn't want to though. Yes, we have a lot of homeschool stuff but like others I'm not sure we have enough for the rest of the year. My eldest is a leaps & bounds, alternating with periods of stagnation kind girl. Half the time when I buy something she has already outgrown it by the time it arrives & the other half she is just not ready for something that seemed perfect on ordering.

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I conceivably have enough to homeschool through graduation without spending another penny (if I made prodigious use of the library). If suddenly my husband were to lose his job and I had zero funds to spend, I could make it through the next 4 years. I wouldn't want to do that though because everything wouldn't be tailored to my son, but I could.

 

However, since we aren't in some survival situation like that I'll continue to buy whatever I need and want to make our homeschool a great experience with plenty of enrichment and resources to keep things from being dull and also to help better foster retention, etc.

 

Besides, how else would I feed my book addiction? ;-) It doesn't matter that all our bookshelves are stuffed full and even doubled up...there can never be too many books!

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I'm now at the stage of shopping for bookshelves instead of books so I can get to a point where dh stops asking where I am going to put all these books.

 

He is extremely relieved that our free trial month of Amazon Prime is over, and we won't be signing up. :(

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I'm a sucker for a good deal. :) Books? Bring 'em on. Pile 'em up. We are not strapped for space here, but the space is finite, and I do weed out curriculum that was a great deal at the time but that I know we will realistically never use. Fortunately, dh does not complain. He is a packrat himself. :) (Says the lady who has about 4 or 5 algebra textbooks and 3 pre algebra ones...with no students in algebra yet. :D )

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Well, I know for a fact that I do NOT have enough, but that's because we have yet to switch to homeschooling (6 weeks to the end of the school year and the end of tuition payments!) and I have to wait until then before we can really afford to start purchasing.

 

In the meantime I've been doing a lot of "homework" (yeah, let's call it that) researching curricula options on these forums and maybe some other places. WTM forums are addicting....

 

To you-all's credit these forums have been a big help in my efforts to identify and select curricula and materials to get. However, you-uns are also EVIL in that you tell of oh, so many! wonderful and enticing enriching things as well. :drool5:

 

I am currently trying to put together a spreadsheet of what specific curricula and levels to purchase for which stages of the upcoming year (hs lite over the summer including starting Ancients SOTW, full-on hs after the local conference, Medieval SOTW starting around Thanksgiving). We do have to watch the budget, despite DH's statements that we should plan on buying more than one curriculum for certain subjects, since we won't know until we start whether something will work for us or not. My simple, 2-column list (item and price) has grown many more columns, plus other tabs to segregate the absolute must-have's from the really enticing enrichments, things I can check out at the library, free online stuff, etc.

 

Oh, and I'm going to need to add another tab to the spreadsheet for the museum and zoo memberships I will be buying, since we will have a field trip day at least once every month.

 

And my kids and I have to do some MAJOR decluttering in order to fit in ANY homeschool materials. I bought myself a plastic bin to hold my beginning stuff, until I can get some shelf space cleared and reserved.

 

No, I don't think I'll EVER have "enough". Not in my nature. I'll have to resign myself to not always having each item I want.

 

:chillpill:

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I couldn't go through high school, but I feel like I have too much curriculum and am eager to pare it down to two shelves (one for stuff I'm actively using, one for extra books, reference books, lit, etc.). I find that the more stuff I have the less I get accomplished. All the excess is incredibly distracting.

 

I like this idea. One shelf for curriculum. One shelf for reference.

 

I too accomplish less with more.

 

I'm not done self-educating and buying new books, but I think giving myself a strict storage limit would be helpful. Knowing I have to give something up, to get something new, would help me FINISH things before getting something new.

 

I've had an eventful week here that has been quite unsettling. I need to cull the stacks. It always amazes me that before a major move, I tend to get itchy and am partially prepared for the culling process, when the final events transpire that force a move. I think another one is coming, and I'm at peace with it.

 

I'm super glad I had the time to indulge and wallow in books for awhile. It gave me the chance to really find out what I like. I have had it all spread out like a buffet. I've nibbled it all, and it's time to make a real plate and sit down and eat.

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I like this idea. One shelf for curriculum. One shelf for reference.

 

I too accomplish less with more.

 

I'm not done self-educating and buying new books, but I think giving myself a strict storage limit would be helpful. Knowing I have to give something up, to get something new, would help me FINISH things before getting something new.

 

Can I just first say I love most of your posts? :D

 

My stuff now (including curriculum, acitvity books, any extras, and my stuff to read) has to fit into what is basically a milk crate. Well its a little more rectangular, but everything has to fit in there. If theres too much, it either means I need to sell something, or I need to read a book I have been putting off.

 

Anything that I "plan" to use, but the kids are too you for go into the backroom cupboard. (Meaning stuff for like 6months-1yr from now, if its more than that, then I sell it).

 

Toys are put into 4 rotations. I have 2 baskets, plus a tote in the back room, this is where the currently unused toys go. When the current toy rotation is over, anything that needs to be washed, is washed (by the kids) before it goes back into storage, and the new basket is divided over a few of the large type wicker pot plant baskets. Their rag dolls, night-time snugglers, and diabetes bears are always out. Anything I am unsure about giving away goes into a garbage bag in the backroom cupboard. If the kids don't ask for it, or I don't find/see a suitable use for it, I eventually give it away.

 

School & activity books are in the milk crate, reference books & cooking books (I really have to find a place for the cooking books in the kitchen) are in the backroom on a wall shelf by subject (gardening, homemaking, cooking, home maintenance/house building & DH's books). The lit books are divided up and wrapped in kraft brown paper (I would of used newspaper, but I didn't have any, but for some unknown reason, had several rolls of brown paper). So books are on rotation, and the kids get to open their new "book package" which excites them. The toy room I put an old coffee table for their puppet & people play, an old mosquito net hung from the ceiling with a couple of cushions, turned a bookcase on its side (which holds the toy baskets) and another mini bookshelf which holds their pretend play, gnome bits etc. On top of the "side" of the bookcase, I put a couple of wicker bread baskets (the long skinny ones) and use this as a sort of "portable" thing similar to rain gutter bookshelves. The books can then be faced out, and the current selection of books go there.

 

I do now, of course, have a backroom filled with a couple of shelves of curricula and resources I have to sell, which I am selling s-l-o-w-l-y, this gives me 1. time to grab something back in case I put it there by accident when in a weird mood and 2. I don't get overwhelmed putting a big listing up then trying to concentrate on getting 20 different packages done at once and fielding questions all day. So I either pick one thing (MUS) or one small category (Art) and just concentrate on selling that stuff before moving on to the next.

 

A little OT but hopefully my ramble helps someone :D

 

xxx

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Apart from some consumables, I have enough, but not the right materials to get through the next few years. Ds11 would not do well in Ds13's old textbooks, and I'm nowhere close to satisfied with what we have for world history, biology and high school English. By this time next year, we'll probably be set.

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Can I just first say I love most of your posts? :D

....

 

I do now, of course, have a backroom filled with a couple of shelves of curricula and resources I have to sell, which I am selling s-l-o-w-l-y, this gives me 1. time to grab something back in case I put it there by accident when in a weird mood and 2. I don't get overwhelmed putting a big listing up then trying to concentrate on getting 20 different packages done at once and fielding questions all day. So I either pick one thing (MUS) or one small category (Art) and just concentrate on selling that stuff before moving on to the next.

 

A little OT but hopefully my ramble helps someone :D

 

xxx

 

Well I love YOUR post! It helps ME.

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Funny, but that was my FB status tonight. I spent the majority of my afternoon and evening cleaning out our school room, dusting bookshelves, organizing, etc. I discovered I likely have enough material/curricula to be able to teach all 7 of my children through high school...with a few trips to the library and some online classes. And what am I planning to do in the next week or so? BUY NEW CURRICULA!!!! I am beyond help. My excuse? We are part of a co-op and need specific books for those classes. Other than that...I can easily make do with what I have.

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I will say that although I said I have enough to teach through 8th grade, I don't feel that I have too much (and not in a wild-eyed, denial-based, "my precious" kind of way). :lol: I have bought ahead only for what is tried and true here, when I see it listed for a great price. Most of it is not curricula, just books, books, and more books. I think if I had lots of separate programs lying around because I never found a perfect fit or thought in what-ifs constantly, I would feel overwhelmed instead of comforted.

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I like this idea. One shelf for curriculum. One shelf for reference.

I too accomplish less with more.

I'm not done self-educating and buying new books, but I think giving myself a strict storage limit would be helpful. Knowing I have to give something up, to get something new, would help me FINISH things before getting something new.

I've had an eventful week here that has been quite unsettling. I need to cull the stacks. It always amazes me that before a major move, I tend to get itchy and am partially prepared for the culling process, when the final events transpire that force a move. I think another one is coming, and I'm at peace with it.

I'm super glad I had the time to indulge and wallow in books for awhile. It gave me the chance to really find out what I like. I have had it all spread out like a buffet. I've nibbled it all, and it's time to make a real plate and sit down and eat.

Can I just first say I love most of your posts? :D

My stuff now (including curriculum, acitvity books, any extras, and my stuff to read) has to fit into what is basically a milk crate. Well its a little more rectangular, but everything has to fit in there. If theres too much, it either means I need to sell something, or I need to read a book I have been putting off.

Anything that I "plan" to use, but the kids are too you for go into the backroom cupboard. (Meaning stuff for like 6months-1yr from now, if its more than that, then I sell it).

Toys are put into 4 rotations. I have 2 baskets, plus a tote in the back room, this is where the currently unused toys go. When the current toy rotation is over, anything that needs to be washed, is washed (by the kids) before it goes back into storage, and the new basket is divided over a few of the large type wicker pot plant baskets. Their rag dolls, night-time snugglers, and diabetes bears are always out. Anything I am unsure about giving away goes into a garbage bag in the backroom cupboard. If the kids don't ask for it, or I don't find/see a suitable use for it, I eventually give it away.

School & activity books are in the milk crate, reference books & cooking books (I really have to find a place for the cooking books in the kitchen) are in the backroom on a wall shelf by subject (gardening, homemaking, cooking, home maintenance/house building & DH's books). The lit books are divided up and wrapped in kraft brown paper (I would of used newspaper, but I didn't have any, but for some unknown reason, had several rolls of brown paper). So books are on rotation, and the kids get to open their new "book package" which excites them. The toy room I put an old coffee table for their puppet & people play, an old mosquito net hung from the ceiling with a couple of cushions, turned a bookcase on its side (which holds the toy baskets) and another mini bookshelf which holds their pretend play, gnome bits etc. On top of the "side" of the bookcase, I put a couple of wicker bread baskets (the long skinny ones) and use this as a sort of "portable" thing similar to rain gutter bookshelves. The books can then be faced out, and the current selection of books go there.

A little OT but hopefully my ramble helps someone :D

xxx

Well I love YOUR post! It helps ME.

 

And I loved both of your posts!

 

My curricula has to fit in a cupboard, so I'm trying not to buy ahead. Right now I'm concentrating on the "bones" - reference books, Cuisenaire rods - and next year's curricula. It helps that DD also attends a B&M school, but because we are overseas what I teach is not covered in her school, so it's like she's dual enrolled already in kindergarten. But it also means I can not worry about science, music, art, French, Turkish. I can focus on history, English reading, writing, etc., and math because she's struggling.

 

Off to cull the toys....

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Yep, I do. I read a book by Mary Pride (can't remember the title) where she called it "educational clutter". Next year I will be homeschooling only my younger son, since my older son is graduating this year. This is the first year in FOREVER that I have not bought anything for the next school year. It's killing me!LOL

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I'm really turning into a minimalist lately, partly because I want to keep it simple and partly because we will be roadschooling for 4-5 months this year. I used to have tons of supplemental stuff and have been getting rid of it all. Really it was a distraction from just teaching. If I can't get it on Kindle or PDF or as an iPad app, I'm unlikely to buy it. I made a list of what we need to travel and its just:

 

Rightstart math box and c-rods

Handwriting paper

Kindle

iPad

Sketch pad and colored pencils

 

Obviously there will be more when we settle, science tools and paper books and such, but I plan to be very careful about adding stuff back in. I would rather put our money into museum memberships which are valuable and dont take up any space. I guess I'm becoming a "just enough" homeschooler.

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Yes and no.

 

For the younger grades it's not an issue of having enough because so much of it is consumable. So every year I buy the same math, same phonics, same maps...

 

The older the get, the less consumable it tends to be, but it also tends to be more expensive, harder to find used for a decent price, and the more tailored to the individual child, thus not reused necessarily for the next child coming up.

 

My dh knew he was marrying a woman who loved books, so, home schooling or not, he somewhat knew to expect our home to be taken over by books.

 

I don't think it's any different than the garage or a den being "overtaken" by sports stuff, tools, car stuff, or whatever that is somewhat typical of men over the years as they accumulate things.

 

As we get older, we accumulate stuff.

 

Doing a purge once a year or so is very healthy and highly recommended, but I don't think the accumulation itself is a big deal or unreasonable as long as we're not talking hoarders or bankruptcy type of issues.

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I'm in good company that my dh also loves books. The Saturday morning of the library used sale every Spring is planned far in advance....complete with an over night stay for the kids at grandparents (so we can get up and go that morning) and a leisurely morning of book shopping and going out for brunch and coffee. It's our morning!!!

 

But we do get rid of books every year as donations to the library sale. We don't go unless a full box or two goes to them. We really love books.

 

But the children's books and homeschooling books are my realm. We have bookshelves everywhere. I'm always looking for better ways to organize everything. I've been thinking about cooling it on buying children's picture books. I sometimes feel we have more than we actually read. I like the idea of wrapping them up and revealing them. Something to think about.

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Officially? Yes, since dd graduates in a few weeks, and I have another child entering high school who is already using items that dd used.

 

Unofficially? No way. Never. I learn about new books all the time. I have a zillion Amazon wishlists. I am sure when I die there will be items in my cart that I am just waiting to add to to get the $25 total for free shipping so I can complete my order. I hope my family will order them and enjoy them.

 

The end.

 

That is all. ;)

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Honestly? No, I really don't. I try to only get what I need for the year. That being said, well, if I came across something fantastic at a garage sale or thrift shop or something - I'd buy it in a second. :001_smile:

 

Sorry for not introducing myself in the proper place, but hello!

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I apply my "it's only in my home if I need it" rule to homeschooling materials just like anything else. We have neither the room nor the tolerance for clutter. If we are done with something, it goes away. I add things pretty slowly. I don't tend to scrap materials early or switch programs. All of my homeschooling materials both owned and checked out from the homeschool lending library reside on one not full, not huge bookshelf in one small room. This bookshelf also holds our printer, paper and supplies like a hole punch and stapler. They have two huge full bookshelves of general/fun reading books in their room. I think this is enough for the one school age child I have. Because of the age gap, I don't see the need to hold onto much hs stuff for the younger son because I have no idea if the same things will work for him or not. So far I am only holding onto the Beast Academy guides and some poetry books. If I had more kids, I imagine I would have more stuff.

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Another reason I've found myself saving things for the younger children is just budgetary. I have a limited amount that I spend each year...one lump sum in the Spring and another in summer. I also stretch out some funds a bit throughout the year. I've decided that if I keep some basics for the next child I could get some fun stuff that I didn't have room for before. This year I was able to get some math manipulatives and some history materials (books and nice timelines) and some science hands on materials.

 

If I'm getting all new curriculum for the basic readin', writin', and arithmetic each year for each child then that limits those extras that really can make a homeschool fun. I'll make anything work for a particular child, and only if it's a complete disaster will I change it (Writing Strands comes to mind). I'm not digging OPGTR too much so I'm researching switching to WRTR. But I'll likely still keep or utilize the OPG as well as resource.

 

I really do understand when people say something might not "work" for a particular child. WS was a complete disaster no matter what I did to teach it. But for the most part I believe the parent teacher teaches, not the book, so there's nothing to "work" necessarily.

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