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We just finished reading Galileo's Leaning Tower Experiment (http://www.amazon.com/Galileos-Leaning-Experiment-Selection-Charlesbridge/dp/1570918708/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365359182&sr=8-1&keywords=Galileo+leaning+tower+experiment) and my son absolutely loved it. Is there a list of science topics told through picture books? We own a ton of living math books because they are so effective for ds; is there an equivalent site to livingmath.net for science?

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We just finished reading Galileo's Leaning Tower Experiment (http://www.amazon.co...ower experiment) and my son absolutely loved it. Is there a list of science topics told through picture books? We own a ton of living math books because they are so effective for ds; is there an equivalent site to livingmath.net for science?

 

http://www.funschooling.net/

http://www.pennygard...sciencebks.html

http://groups.yahoo..../LivingScience/

 

There are also books like the For Kids series, including Isaac Newton and Physics for Kids, Thomas Edison for Kids, and Galileo for Kids.

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Archimedes and The Door of Science is a great living science book. There are plenty of vintage science books that use a story telling format. Most of the ones we have used focus on Nature Study. The Storybook of Science by Henri Fabre is one that comes to mind, you can read it and others at mainlesson.com to see if it is what you are looking for, they have a list for Science under Genres.

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We just finished reading Galileo's Leaning Tower Experiment (http://www.amazon.co...ower experiment) and my son absolutely loved it. Is there a list of science topics told through picture books? We own a ton of living math books because they are so effective for ds; is there an equivalent site to livingmath.net for science?

 

 

My dd loved that book as well. She still talks about it!

 

I have had quite a bit of luck just searching our library's online catalog. I've found quite a few that way.

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Thanks everyone! We finally got Archimedes and the Door of Science through interlibrary loan this week and I'm excited to start reading it. I found the Galileo book through a random search of our library on the topic of gravity, so I know those hidden gems are out there.

 

Now I'm off to check out those lists!

 

Does anyone else have a favourite science story book?

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It's not quite the same as a "story book", but my DD really likes Janice Van Cleave's Scientists Through the Ages: http://amzn.com/0471252220 -- It's short biographies of a number of famous scientists.

 

Along a totally different line is 11 Experiments That Failed: http://amzn.com/0375847626

 

It's very, very funny and a good jumping off point for a discussion about the scientific method.

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Also FarrarWilliams used various of Bernie Zubrowski's books, and while they are not storybooks, they are activity-driven (he was at the Children's Museum in Boston). They are OOP but available cheaply used.

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The last one we read that we really liked was An Extraordinary Life about a monarch butterfly.

 

I've never seen an excellent, complete feeling list of good living science books. The ones Stripe linked above are good... they're just such a tiny fraction of what's out there. There's so many good books.

 

And those Boston Children's Museum Activity Books really rule. But they're not stories.

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No, they're not stories. I listed them anyway!

 

Vicki Cobb and Seymour Simon each have some books for little kids that are narrative and then stop for the kid to try it out. I think the particular Seymour Simon ones I am thinking of (for example, one on bridges) may be OOP, though. They all start with Let's Try it Out with....Vicki Cobb's books in question are I Face the Wind, I Fall Down, I See Myself, etc, about wind, gravity, and mirrors/reflections.

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We read a lot of Let's Read and Find Out, Seymour Simon and Vicki Cobb (love Vicki Cobb!). I think the difference with the Galileo book was that it was about a person rather than just a concept.

 

Maybe what I'm really looking for are books about scientists.

 

Or a list of picture book biographies.

 

ETA: Thank you for all the suggestions so far! This is really helping me to pinpoint exactly what I am looking for.

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We love the Seymour Simon books too. And Sandra Markle. And the scientist in the field... All of them are nonfiction, but really worthwhile.

 

And I realized, I had a post about chapter book read alouds for nature study. A few of them are better for older middle grades listeners:

http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com/2013/03/24/read-alouds-to-go-with-nature-study/

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Also, about scientists specifically, the Scientist in the Field series is good (a recent discovery for us - I think maybe Alte Veste suggested it?). And we loved the book The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (about an Amazon rainforest scientist - she takes her kids climbing with her!) and Hidden Worlds (about a microscopist).

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We read a lot of Let's Read and Find Out, Seymour Simon and Vicki Cobb (love Vicki Cobb!). I think the difference with the Galileo book was that it was about a person rather than just a concept.

 

Maybe what I'm really looking for are books about scientists.

 

Or a list of picture book biographies.

 

ETA: Thank you for all the suggestions so far! This is really helping me to pinpoint exactly what I am looking for.

 

Ah, I think I know what you're looking for, but quality books of this type on the k-3 level seem to be pretty rare.

 

 

The Librarian who Measured the Earth, The Man Who Made Time Travel, or Born In The Breezes: The Voyages Of Joshua Slocum all by Kathryn Lasky is one I've found. Senefer: A Young Genius in Old Egypt by Beatrice Lumpkin could be good.

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