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Running shoes. I'm not supposed to take up jogging, too bad Ortho doc because it works. But, I need new shoes. Help!


FaithManor
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I injured my ankle very, very badly in college - tore every single ligament, two tendons, dislocated bones in my foot to go with the not broken but horridly abused ankle, etc. As the doc who did my care put it, "You are lucky you learned to walk so well again. Normally, you'd be using a cane for the rest of your life."

 

So, I'm not supposed to be doing any impact exercise. The problem is walking and exercise bike doesn't get the job done for me for weight loss and sheering the excess baggage off my hips. Jogging works. I'm doing fast walking on the treadmill at the gym and a week ago I started adding one minute burst of jogging three times in each work out. I don't have the stamina for much more than that yet, but already, for the first time in a decade +, the scale is starting to move and my pants are beginning to loosen a little. I am wearing an ankle brace for support and so far, the ankle is enduring it well.

 

However, my shoes are walking shoes...New Balance from JCPenny. I'm not certain that's enough support for jogging and I know nothing about running shoes.

 

I need a shoe that I can purchase in a wide - as in WIDE across the toes - I have a nasty bunion on my right foot...currently, even though my shoes have been fine for walking, I am sporting a blister on the top of that bunion from yesterday's workout. I'll bandage it up for today's workout, but ultimately, I think that I need a better shoe.

 

If you run, what do you suggest? I could go to the city (Detroit) next week to shop.

 

Faith

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I love Saucony, but dh likes Asics. DH has tried to convice me that the Asics are better, but when I try them on, I'm uncomfortable walking in them. I think it has to do with the way we walk/run. (Neither of us, though, are serious runners.) Really, if you can, try to find a running store whose employees can watch how you walk and run and can make recommendations based on your pronation. That way, your foot and ankle would have the necessary support. The wrong pair of shoes could cause you further damage.

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I suggest you listen to your doctor.

 

Buy yourself a new bathing suit and start swimming.

 

 

I live in the sticks. There isn't anywhere to swim. There is ONE indoor pool in a three county radius, belongs to the high school, and due to budget cuts, they no longer have open swim. It may be closing all together.

 

Swimming works for me. I did A LOT of swimming in college, but I'd have a two hour commute every time I wanted to do laps if I decided to adopt that form of exercise. At $3.85 a gallon for gas and $5.00 for open swim, I'd be going through a huge pile of cash.

 

Thanks for the suggestion though. If I lived near the city, you can bet that is exactly what I would be doing.

 

Faith

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I think the reason the jogging works is that it gets your heart rate up more, you are "sprinting", which triggers major metabolism shifts. Can you TRY doing "sprints" on the bike before deciding to switch to jogging? In other words, bike at your normal speed for several minutes then as fast/hard as you can for 1 minute, then recover for 4 minutes, etc. You should be able to modify any exercise to High Intensity Interval training, which is what you were doing on the treadmill. Give it a try and see what you think.

 

I'd hate to see you reinjure your ankle and not even be able to walk or bike, you know?

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New Balance is wide across the toe box, and yes the shoes you have from Penny's won't cut it. Get thee to a running store and try shoes on. You most likey want a stability shoe and maybe even some Superfeet to help with the ankle (but I don't know about that). If you could fit in Asics I would say get the Kayano, they have the most cushion, but Asics have a tighter toe box. NB's is the best for the toes box, but the ankle has a bit less support (not as tight back there). You could also try Saucony's. They have the tighter ankle, and larger toe box, but I found them tight against the instep. You have to try on the shoes. You do best to go to a store that has a treadmill so you can jog in them.

 

Be careful. It's so easy to hurt the ankle. If you are not doing them, do eccentric heel drops.

 

I will say this, docs tend to be overly cautious. If you take it easy, and don't try to progress too quickly you may be fine.

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I suggest you go to an athletic shoe store that has someone on staff who knows how to fit your foot with the proper shoe. Everyone's foot is different, and what might be perfect for one person might not be the best choice for another.

 

One of my daughters enjoys running but was having severe problems with her feet and ankles. We learned a lot about running shoes that year! the different styles, what to look for with different kinds of feet, etc. She finally found one pair that at least helped with distant walking. However, after meeting with several specialists, she was finally told, "Look, your feet just aren't meant to run." She bikes a lot now and swims too, and still loves to walk everywhere. But running -- no.

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I can't suggest what type of shoe but if you have super wide feet I would look at men's shoes instead of women's. I have super wide feet as well and my fave shoes are from the men's side of the store (and they last a lot longer, too).

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New Balance is wide across the toe box, and yes the shoes you have from Penny's won't cut it. Get thee to a running store and try shoes on. You most likey want a stability shoe and maybe even some Superfeet to help with the ankle (but I don't know about that). If you could fit in Asics I would say get the Kayano, they have the most cushion, but Asics have a tighter toe box. NB's is the best for the toes box, but the ankle has a bit less support (not as tight back there). You could also try Saucony's. They have the tighter ankle, and larger toe box, but I found them tight against the instep. You have to try on the shoes. You do best to go to a store that has a treadmill so you can jog in them.

 

Be careful. It's so easy to hurt the ankle. If you are not doing them, do eccentric heel drops.

 

I will say this, docs tend to be overly cautious. If you take it easy, and don't try to progress too quickly you may be fine.

 

Thanks!!!!

 

I will check into everything you mentioned, but I am leaning maybe towards the New Balance because of that toe box. For ankle support, I'm running with an ankle brace that provides as much support or even more than what basketball and track coaches provide when they tape ankles. To be honest, I've received better advice from the sports medicine trainer dude at the gym than I did from the physical therapist or the doc that treated me. He actually thinks that with the brace, the right shoe, stretching before hand, and running ONLY on the treadmill so that have a controlled surface, vs. outdoors, I should be fine. The only thing he won't let me do for a very long time is increase the incline.

 

I have treated that ankle like a baby for years to the detriment of any kind of reasonable exercise plan. I'm tired of it. I've got a dad with heart disease, a mom with type II diabetes, and a couple of cancers that run in the family. I have decided that I'm taking charge over my health and the ankle cannot be the only consideration. Despite the general soreness I have because I've also been working out with weights like a zealot :D , I feel so much better in just the five weeks that I've had a gym membership, that I have no desire to plateau so early because of a previous injury.

 

I am pretty certain that my current NB walking shoes are just not cutting it across the board. By mile three on the exercise bike at only a level 2 difficulty, my feet get tingly and start going to sleep or worse, cramping. I've read that this is a sign that your shoes are too tight for that particular activity so I told dh I'm pulling some money out for shoes. He's fine with that. I just hope it won't be more than $125.00.

 

Faith

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I injured my ankle very, very badly in college - tore every single ligament, two tendons, dislocated bones in my foot to go with the not broken but horridly abused ankle, etc. As the doc who did my care put it, "You are lucky you learned to walk so well again. Normally, you'd be using a cane for the rest of your life."

 

So, I'm not supposed to be doing any impact exercise.

 

My suggestion is that you heed your doctor's advice.

 

If your doctor said, "You are lucky you learned to walk so well again. Normally, you'd be using a cane for the rest of your life," I honestly think you are making a huge mistake by deciding to start running, just because it's the easiest way for you to lose weight. It could also be the easiest way for you to wind up in a wheelchair.

 

I'm sorry to sound so harsh, but I wouldn't even think of trying to recommend a shoe for you, based on the medical info you provided.

 

I hope you can find a safer alternative -- have you asked your doctor for suggestions?

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Mizuno is what I wear. Big toe box. Small heel. Arch further forward than some of the other shoes I've tried. Almost perfect for me.

I've been through Brooks, Aesics, Newbalance, Nike. I've tried Sacony.

Bottom line: It takes time to find the right shoe for some people. I second going to a running store for a fitting, and be sure that they have a good return policy. Most stores are great about having you return when a shoe isn't working and try another pair of another brand. Just be sure to ask. Also pick up a few pairs of really cushy socks when you are there. The right running socks make a great deal of difference when it comes to blistering.

 

Keep everything very slow as you start to jog. I suggest that you monitor any pain response very carefully. Take a day of or more between your runs. If you can bike (and I get that ankles hurt when biking too!) that would be a low impact thing you might could do on a day off. I would never run on any day that you have to take something for pain. If I feel that I need something for pain that's a clear sign that I shouldn't run that day.

 

Edit: About that injury. It's going to change your natural gait. In fact, it's changed the whole way you use that leg. I had a hip injury some time ago, ended up putting on a lot of weight and just recently I've run off almost fifty pounds. BUT what I didn't think of at the time (and I was being careful with my run intervals and intensity) was that the old issue with the hip actually changed the dynamics of my stride. That's set me up for some foot and ankle stuff now, and I'm fighting plantar fasciitis in one foot. I swear, that's because my stride is off in the one leg!

I'm thinking about looking into having my gait examined to see what I need to work on to protect myself from futher injury. My hip is the way it is, and it won't get better. But maybe I need to have one type of shoe on one foot and a different one on the other! I don't know. But I'm planning on asking about getting my stride looked at to see if there is anything I can do to help myself avoid injury when running.

 

So just a careful comment about old injury setting you up for new ones. A bad ankle might be stabile enough with good shoeing, but you might wind up hurting something else.

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Have you considered an elliptical or something like the treadclimber?

 

If you could alternate speedwalking (walk REALLY fast), an elliptical trainer of some sort, and maybe biking, your ankle would probably do okay. I would avoid doing the same thing daily.

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I will say this, docs tend to be overly cautious. If you take it easy, and don't try to progress too quickly you may be fine.

 

But the thing is, we don't know if that's the case here, and she may not be fine.

 

Based on what Faith told us about her injury and her doctor's orders, it worries me that people are recommending shoes, instead of recommending a call to the doctor to get his OK before starting a new high-impact exercise program.

 

I'm sorry to sound so negative -- I just don't want to see her get hurt or maybe do permanent damage to her ankle.

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I use to run until a few years ago. The thing is 25 years of it did damage to my ankles. I now do High Intensity Low Impact Aerobic dvd. They give me the same burn as running.

 

I have a shock absorbing mat that I work out on in addiction to keeping things low impact. I don't follow a program. I pick and choose workout from all different programs.

 

My current workouts are from

http://shop.cathe.com/low_impact_exercise_dvds_s/89.htm

 

http://www.beachbody.com/product/fitness_programs/turbofire.do I've followed the program when I first went from running to dvds. I now have figured out how to not run but still get the cardio/calorie burn I need.

 

I'm 43 so I get wanting to keep doing the same thing thats worked for you but it will cause severe arthritis possible future joint replacements if you don't baby those joints.

 

I still get swelling even with low impact but no pain. Good Luck finding something that works for you.

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But the thing is, we don't know if that's the case here, and she may not be fine.

 

Based on what Faith told us about her injury and her doctor's orders, it worries me that people are recommending shoes, instead of recommending a call to the doctor to get his OK before starting a new high-impact exercise program.

 

I'm sorry to sound so negative -- I just don't want to see her get hurt or maybe do permanent damage to her ankle.

 

 

No, I don't think you sound too negative. It's good to be cautious. But doctors are not really necessarily trained to get you back to a sport, just back on your feet and not reinjured. There are docs who specialize in that, as well as PT's. There is also a speciality whose job it is to help you do your sport, helping you through the injury (can't think what they are called right now).

 

Since her injury was so long ago she has some chance. Pain will be the best indicator. Do not push through pain. Pain is your friend. It tells you when to stop.

 

An eliptical might be a good alternative, but Faith already has a treadmill. It expensive to go buy new equipment. If the foot starts to hurt, though, I would try an eliptical, or something like kettlebell. Or, if she can find one, the best bang for your buck calorie burning wise would be the old Nordic Tracks that imitated the cross country skiing.

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My suggestion is that you heed your doctor's advice.

 

I hope you can find a safer alternative -- have you asked your doctor for suggestions?

 

The injury was 25 years ago. The ortho was 65 at the time. I think he's passed away. Since then, it's healed well enough that I was completely discharged from care. The GP doesn't even think about it anymore. So, I have not had any recent advice...easily, none since say 2000 anyway which was the last time a doctor even wanted to discuss it. The chiropractor expresses more interest than the medical docs do.

 

So, the advice that I have been getting recently is coming from a guy with a degree in sport medicine who works out at the gym. He's far more knowledgeable than the physical therapist I had back in 1988. Of course, I'm sure there has been a lot of improvements in physical therapy since then, I just don't qualify for any further care, at least from an insurance perspective and the GP doesn't think I need a referral. If I got into trouble, I did meet an ortho down at Beaumont Hospital when I was helping a friend that was injured and I thought he was fantastic, so I'd consider paying out of pocket for a word from him if needed. However, I'm really happy with this sports medicine trainer. He has a lot of experience and his knowledge of soft tissue injuries such as mine, seems far more extensive than the doc or the chiro.

 

As for GP or endo suggestions on weight loss other than to be constantly berated for being over weight as if continuing to kick my self-esteem in the ribs will be a wonderful motivator? I find them completely incompetant when it comes to knowledge of health issues that aren't cured with a prescription pad or surgery. Cut, burn, medicate...that's pretty much all the docs in our area know. The dangers of living in the sticks and having restrictive insurance. I've already gone round for round in a battle of wills on behalf of my dad - maybe when I get dad squared a way (and that is going to be a very long time), I'll consider getting into it for myself. Spycar and Bethany as well as others are helping me become a better patient advocate for him! Let's see, what was it that the endo whom I fired two years ago said to me? OH ya, "Try not eating a dozen doughnuts per day." :mad: Nice, at that time I was virtually grain free and almost vegetarian with a diet that never exceeded 1200 calories per day. But, if you are overweight, you are a bad person...totally character flawed according to that chump. First visit was also the last visit! Current endo is working on the bad thyroid from a medicine perspective but has nothing else to say on any other issue. He is at least, personable and not condescending.

 

I'll stop running if I get into trouble. However, I'm determined to give this a shot and I am following the advice of the trainer to.the.letter. I feel so much better. Well, okay NOT my sides. My sides are very sore today. They have this weight machine there where you can do crunches with weights...not certain how to describe it. Anyway, it was time to increase the weight last night and YOWZA!!!! My side muscles are barking like junk yard dogs today. Hopefully, when I go workout tonight, it will loosen up a bit during the stretching part of the routine.

 

Thanks,

Faith

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Strength training is the "new" cardio. Everything I'm reading these days in fitness mags (like Oxygen) and fitness books (like this one) all agree that strength training give more bang for your buck including cardio for the heart and lungs.

 

If you can't swim then check out other forms of exercise. I can't swim.....as in I'm not a good swimmer. Anyway, do not poo-poo yoga for example. Yoga can really get your heart pumping! A lot of people think yoga is wimpy. It is not. It can be a great cardio workout.

 

You can also focus more on upper body moves for cardio. Jillian Michaels has stated that doing punches (while standing in a lunge or squat if wanted) is great for lower body injuries.

 

Rebounder. You can get awesome cardio on a rebounder with minimal stress on your body/joints. Instead of running shoes get thyself a nice rebounder and some great tunes.

 

There are so many choices. It does not have to be jogging.

 

Oh, I just remembered. According to that book above (can't recommend it enough) there is no difference in calories burned between fast walking and jogging. No difference.

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The injury was 25 years ago. … I have not had any recent advice …

I would tend to ignore 25 year old advice, also.

So, the advice that I have been getting recently is coming from a guy with a degree in sport medicine who works out at the gym. He's far more knowledgeable than the physical therapist I had back in 1988. … I'm really happy with this sports medicine trainer. He has a lot of experience and his knowledge of soft tissue injuries such as mine, seems far more extensive than the doc or the chiro.

Sounds like you have a great resource in your trainer!

As for GP or endo suggestions on weight loss other than to be constantly berated for being over weight as if continuing to kick my self-esteem in the ribs will be a wonderful motivator? I find them completely incompetant when it comes to knowledge of health issues that aren't cured with a prescription pad or surgery. … Let's see, what was it that the endo whom I fired two years ago said to me? OH ya, "Try not eating a dozen doughnuts per day." :mad: Nice, at that time I was virtually grain free and almost vegetarian with a diet that never exceeded 1200 calories per day. But, if you are overweight, you are a bad person...totally character flawed according to that chump. … :grouphug:

I'm so sorry he said that to you.

I'll stop running if I get into trouble. However, I'm determined to give this a shot and I am following the advice of the trainer to.the.letter. …

Faith, Keep up the good work. Your dedication is motivating me! (sorry about the formatting - I don't think my keyboard is working correctly)

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Go online to www.roadrunnersports.com. Call up a rep, don't use the on-line shoe finder. They will help you find a shoe. Many brands come in wide. Also, consider seeing some kind of physical therapist that specializes in functional movement.

 

Perhaps this link will give you some tips in finding a doctor to help you get running again. http://www.functionalmovement.com

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I get it about not wanting to baby the ankle to the detriment of the rest of your body. I have a dd who has those type of problems too.

I would suggest that you see another ortho dr. they might give you a go ahead for your exercise.

Your ankle sounds like it might be much better than that dr. thought it would be. I agree that carrying around exess weight wouldnt be great for your ankle either.

I love the feeling of strength that I get when exercising. That must be why I stop and start so much!

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I am not going to dive into the should you/shouldn't you question. I will tell you that I was very prone to painful shin splints when jumping or running. Then I started wearing Keen sneakers and Solomon sneakers. My NB ones were, sorry to say, cr@p when it came supporting my ankle and arch. The Solomons are so cushy and supportive they are like a luxury vacation for my feet. They are around $125 or so.

 

I will say that it is possible to get bursts of intensity with intervals on other gym equipment than a treadmill (the new stair step climbers come to mind) or by riding an actual bike, finding the short hills. I think it is the intervals of intensity that is helping you the most, not specifically running. Also, if it is old advice, then see your doctor for new advice. That is always advisable before starting a new exercise program.

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I don't know enough to get into the medical end of things, but wanted to add that my whole family loves New Balance for wide feet.

 

If you get a pair you like, keep track of what last the shoe model uses -- then, when models change, you can keep using the same past. Info is on website.

 

Also NB is great about returns - they pay return postage. Fast growing ds went through several sizes of his favorite sneaker before we got the right size -- NB kept paying for shipping. I was a loyal NB customer before, but now I am super loyal! Oh, I should add that their regular shipping is very fast.

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if there is a GOOD running store (not a chain!) staffed by actual competitive runners, I would start there for shoes. (the way to tell is the ad will be aimed at real runners). it is less about the brand, and more about the fit and support. (though quality matters.) If you have an REI, they might be helpful. (rei here is staffed by very serious outdoor enthusiasts.) you want to try running in the shoe too - even if it is just up and down an aisle. take your brace with you, and make sure the shoe is compatible with the brace. (I assume it's a good and very supportive one. - there are some cheap braces out there that don't do much.)

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I agree with Catwoman & Unsinkable re: this sounding unwise.

 

However, if you insist on jogging, aren't there stores which put you on a treadmill & analyze your gait to find the best shoe? I've never done it but I know I've heard of that. That sounds like the best way to fit a running shoe to me.

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I suggest you go to an athletic shoe store that has someone on staff who knows how to fit your foot with the proper shoe. Everyone's foot is different, and what might be perfect for one person might not be the best choice for another.

 

:iagree: that's why it is less about brand, and everything about fit and support. even if you need to add more supportive insoles.

To be honest, I've received better advice from the sports medicine trainer dude at the gym than I did from the physical therapist or the doc that treated me. He actually thinks that with the brace, the right shoe, stretching before hand, and running ONLY on the treadmill so that have a controlled surface, vs. outdoors, I should be fine. The only thing he won't let me do for a very long time is increase the incline.

sports medicine have much more training in this area (how your body performs/responds to intense physical activity) than an ortho. I would also get a 2nd opinion from someone not associated with the gym.

 

Bottom line: It takes time to find the right shoe for some people. I second going to a running store for a fitting, and be sure that they have a good return policy. Most stores are great about having you return when a shoe isn't working and try another pair of another brand. Just be sure to ask. Also pick up a few pairs of really cushy socks when you are there. The right running socks make a great deal of difference when it comes to blistering.

 

good comment on the socks. my dd's world class competitor x-cntry coach told them NOT to wear cotton socks. you want something that is completely breathable, and will wick moisture away from your feet. (cotton will hold onto every drop of perspiration.)

I did meet an ortho down at Beaumont Hospital when I was helping a friend that was injured and I thought he was fantastic, so I'd consider paying out of pocket for a word from him if needed. However, I'm really happy with this sports medicine trainer. He has a lot of experience and his knowledge of soft tissue injuries such as mine, seems far more extensive than the doc.

it might be worth talking to the ortho about your ankle - as a 2nd opinion. if the sports med guy is associated with the gym, it could color his opinions. generally sports medicine is very worth what they say in regards to sports as they have far more training in this area.

As for GP or endo suggestions on weight loss other than to be constantly berated for being over weight as if continuing to kick my self-esteem in the ribs will be a wonderful motivator? I find them completely incompetant when it comes to knowledge of health issues that aren't cured with a prescription pad or surgery. Cut, burn, medicate...that's pretty much all the docs in our area know.

 

very few doctors, even in the city associated with our major medical school, know much about how to do anything that doesn't involve medical intervention. that's what medical schools teach.

My dd, a runner, came home with a book, ten years thinner, that goes against much of the prevailing attitudes about weight loss. she loves it (she was looking for a fitness program - though she has never been overweight). my son got it from the library and it was a motivator to him and loves it, and dh read it, and was impressed with it enough he actually broke down and bought a copy of the book.

I've never been a weigh myself kinda gal - it's about how my clothes fit. fat has 3x the volume of muscle so you can have two people who weigh the same - and are *very* different sizes. (I've a friend who has always been thin, started working as a trainer and gained ten pounds while dropping a dress size.) incidently - as you build muscle, you'll burn more calories 24/7 because muscle needs more calories.

Strength training is the "new" cardio. Everything I'm reading these days in fitness mags (like Oxygen) and fitness books (like this one) all agree that strength training give more bang for your buck including cardio for the heart and lungs.

 

If you can't swim then check out other forms of exercise. I can't swim.....as in I'm not a good swimmer. Anyway, do not poo-poo yoga for example. Yoga can really get your heart pumping! A lot of people think yoga is wimpy. It is not. It can be a great cardio workout.

 

people who think yoga is for wimps have never done a real yoga workout. :tongue_smilie: I do a 50 minute practice 4x per week. I'm building muscle and getting thinner. (my clothes are fitting better. dh has noticed. ;) ) Plus it's been great for my spine. I still see my chiro 1x per month - as the chiro supports the yoga flexibility and spinal position, but eventually I expect to not need to see him at all. (my balance is better, and my cortisol levels have dropped, I have more energy . . . I can breathe so much better . . .) here's a list of 77 unexpected health benefits of doing yoga.

 

I'm adding in pilates 1x - 2x per week until I'm really up to speed on it, then I'll probably switch off. It is another underestimated one, that builds lots of muscle. (I read a forward written by a female OBGyn who said she could *always* tell which of her patients did pilates, and which didn't - even if they worked out regularly. it was all based on the condition of their abdominal muscles.) pilates was developed for injured dancers.

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I admire your desire to jog. As for shoes, I LOVE my Asics. Best running/walking shoes I've ever worn. But, really, what matters is how your foot fits in the shoe. I second and third the recommendation to go to a running store.

 

I also will second the addition of yoga to your workout routine. If I were you, I'd ask some experienced yoga teachers about specific poses to help strengthen your ankle. Like the poster above, I've gone to chiropractors for years because of my back. I wish I'd started doing yoga classes all those years ago because I can tell a HUGE difference in my back and neck since beginning serious yoga practice last year. I might not have needed the chiro if I'd been doing yoga.

 

Take it slow, build strength, lose weight and keep on running.

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I'm echoing the advice to find a good running store with knowledgeable staffers who are willing to let you try on and run in a zillion pairs of shoes. The excellent running store in my town has a treadmill in the store so you can run or fast walk or whatever in the shoes you're interested in.

 

I also agree with the advice to keep a log of the shoes you buy and how they work out for you.

 

Good Luck!!!

 

\Anne

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sports medicine have much more training in this area (how your body performs/responds to intense physical activity) than an ortho. I would also get a 2nd opinion from someone not associated with the gym.

 

....

 

it might be worth talking to the ortho about your ankle - as a 2nd opinion. if the sports med guy is associated with the gym, it could color his opinions. generally sports medicine is very worth what they say in regards to sports as they have far more training in this area.

 

I definitely think she should see a doctor about the ankle, rather than rely on some guy at the gym, who -- for all we know -- earned his associate's or bachelor's degree in sports medicine by graduating at the bottom of his class at a bottom-of-the-barrel college. Just because he has a degree doesn't mean he has a clue. If this guy has his doctorate in sports medicine, I would be more inclined to trust his opinion, but even then, he has no real knowledge of the extent of Faith's original injury, nor details on the surgery that was performed to correct the problems, so he's not in a position to give her valid medical advice -- and medical advice is exactly what I think she needs, considering the way she described her injury in her OP. Realistically, she probably needs, at the very least, to have her ankle X-rayed, to see what condition it's in right now.

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Strength training is the "new" cardio. Everything I'm reading these days in fitness mags (like Oxygen) and fitness books (like this one) all agree that strength training give more bang for your buck including cardio for the heart and lungs.

 

If you can't swim then check out other forms of exercise. I can't swim.....as in I'm not a good swimmer. Anyway, do not poo-poo yoga for example. Yoga can really get your heart pumping! A lot of people think yoga is wimpy. It is not. It can be a great cardio workout.

 

You can also focus more on upper body moves for cardio. Jillian Michaels has stated that doing punches (while standing in a lunge or squat if wanted) is great for lower body injuries.

 

Rebounder. You can get awesome cardio on a rebounder with minimal stress on your body/joints. Instead of running shoes get thyself a nice rebounder and some great tunes.

 

There are so many choices. It does not have to be jogging.

 

Oh, I just remembered. According to that book above (can't recommend it enough) there is no difference in calories burned between fast walking and jogging. No difference.

You convinced me .... I just bought the book in 1 click. It's currently waiting for me on my Kindle. I wonder how much $ I would not have spent over the years if I had never found the WTM forums.

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I definitely think she should see a doctor about the ankle, rather than rely on some guy at the gym, who -- for all we know -- earned his associate's or bachelor's degree in sports medicine by graduating at the bottom of his class at a bottom-of-the-barrel college. Just because he has a degree doesn't mean he has a clue. If this guy has his doctorate in sports medicine, I would be more inclined to trust his opinion, but even then, he has no real knowledge of the extent of Faith's original injury, nor details on the surgery that was performed to correct the problems, so he's not in a position to give her valid medical advice -- and medical advice is exactly what I think she needs, considering the way she described her injury in her OP. Realistically, she probably needs, at the very least, to have her ankle X-rayed, to see what condition it's in right now.

 

Yeah, not to beat a dead horse, but yeah.

 

Even just "rolling" an ankle leaves you more vulnerable to injury and what Faith described, YOOWZA!

 

arithmetic, what about a rowing machine?

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Strength training is the "new" cardio. Everything I'm reading these days in fitness mags (like Oxygen) and fitness books (like this one) all agree that strength training give more bang for your buck including cardio for the heart and lungs.

 

If you can't swim then check out other forms of exercise. I can't swim.....as in I'm not a good swimmer. Anyway, do not poo-poo yoga for example. Yoga can really get your heart pumping! A lot of people think yoga is wimpy. It is not. It can be a great cardio workout.

 

You can also focus more on upper body moves for cardio. Jillian Michaels has stated that doing punches (while standing in a lunge or squat if wanted) is great for lower body injuries.

 

Rebounder. You can get awesome cardio on a rebounder with minimal stress on your body/joints. Instead of running shoes get thyself a nice rebounder and some great tunes.

 

There are so many choices. It does not have to be jogging.

 

Oh, I just remembered. According to that book above (can't recommend it enough) there is no difference in calories burned between fast walking and jogging. No difference.

 

You convinced me .... I just bought the book in 1 click. It's currently waiting for me on my Kindle. I wonder how much $ I would not have spent over the years if I had never found the WTM forums.

 

I just got that book from the library yesterday! how bizarre, how bizarre ( name that song!)

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Isn't "How Bizarre" the name of the song? Or maybe it's something else, but I remember it was an OMC song.

 

At least I think I remember. :blush:

 

I should be blushing... It was a pretty lame name that song when I actually named the song! But you are correct...and it was OMC

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I have wide feet near the toes, but narrow near the heel, and Brooks work wonders for me, especially lacing them up with a "runner's tie" to avoid rubbing on the heels. I have also had good luck with adding "SuperFeet" inserts in the shoes. A good running store can help you get a good fit and the right shoe for your needs.

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Faith,

I broke my ankle in 2 places, tore tendons, bruised for almost a year. My Dad, a sports nut, said it was a bad sprain and so I had to heal without any medical treatment. At 37, I finally had X-rays done to confirm what I knew. The ortho said running for me would impact my body as if I was double my weight. I had OT, but my flexibility made it impossible for them to do much. They gave me the special ortho inserts.

 

I would say be careful.

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As a person who had 4 different surgical recommendations from 4 different well regarded neuro-surgeons....I would say that doctors don't always know the right answer. They give you their best guess, from the information they have. That being said, I would consult a current doctor who specializes in sports medicine for an evaluation. Sports medicine doctors are focused on the athlete and getting a person back to activity more than most other doctors.

 

What other posters have said is true, this injury may have changed your gait and you likely compensate for the injury some how. But this is not a new injury for you. Your body has adjusted and you have strengthened other mucles. The key will be how those muscles align your bones now. I would try to find a running store that measures your gait not just your foot. You will want to have it measured not just in the beginning of a run but after a while into it to make your it doesn't change too much when you get fatigued. I personally have a foot drop issue when I get fatigued from a nerve issue in my back. I stumble really easy and need to make sure I don't push my self to hard if it is late in the day (I stand at work all day, so I can be a bit fatigued before I work out). My pt helped me get back into proper alignment, not just what felt good to me.

 

I have a pair of Brooks Adrenaline GTS12 that have a larger toe box. I prefer a high arch that is more towards the front of the shoe. I have narrow foot, and like a larger toe box with a lot of stablity. These are good for my needs.

 

Good luck finding what you need, and I wish you well with your ankle.

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As a child, the ortho wanted to break my feet to correct them. My mom got a secon opinion and decided no to. That dr. Said I would be ok but never be a runner. Well I am a runner. I run about 12 miles a week so nothing too crazy. I see a podiatrist and he recommended the Brooks Adreneline shoe for me. I have a bunion and it has a wide to box. This is a good shoe for me. Continue taking it very slowly, increasing very little every week. If you start to have pain stop and rest it a few days and try again. I would recommend seeing a podiatrist to help with shoes.

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what about a rowing machine?

 

 

You can burn a lot of calories rowing, I would give that a try first. It is as intense as running without the stress on your ankle. I like the machines where you race other "boats" on the screen, it makes working out a lot more fun.

 

Also, strangely enough, rollerblading with a rigid upper part might also be good. It is not as intense as running, but better than fast walking and might be better on the ankle, I would consult a doctor befor trying this, though.

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I'm actually thinking about getting a rowing machine for myself. My mother swore by one for exercise when her feet were really bothering her as the one machine that didn't hurt her plantar fasciitis when it was really bad. That way I've got a good cardio workout for days like today when it's really wet, miserable and my foot hurts. And it would work my upper body which gets neglected.

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Just be careful. You've got a lot of stress in your life right now, and it sounds like you are exercising to deal with it. And that's great! But I'm worried that you might be overdoing it. Not sure working out to the same degree as your stress level is going to be the best thing for your body. Just be careful. I don't have any advice on shoes. My instinct would be to see another doctor, but with a 25 yr old injury, what's you're doing sounds reasonable to me, as long as you aren't having pain. But it's the amount of working out you're doing and your stress level is what worries me. Take care of yourself, too. :grouphug: Exercise is one good way, but moderation is important too.

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Just be careful. You've got a lot of stress in your life right now, and it sounds like you are exercising to deal with it. And that's great! But I'm worried that you might be overdoing it. Not sure working out to the same degree as your stress level is going to be the best thing for your body. Just be careful. I don't have any advice on shoes. My instinct would be to see another doctor, but with a 25 yr old injury, what's you're doing sounds reasonable to me, as long as you aren't having pain. But it's the amount of working out you're doing and your stress level is what worries me. Take care of yourself, too. :grouphug: Exercise is one good way, but moderation is important too.

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