Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

faiths13

math when parent isnt good at it?

Recommended Posts

Is there a math that would work better when a parent isn't good at it? For 6 grade and up I should add. If my ds needs help with math sometimes its hard for me to help him. It depends on the teachers guide. I'm worried as my ds gets older it will get too hard for me. We can't afford a tutor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use Professor B math. Back in the old days it was scripted; now you can get it on CD. My mathy husband vetted it technically, and I just said exactly what the script said. It worked really well for us, and neither child has my math issues--both are competent, which I think is a big accomplishment based on how really horrible I am at it. We are using Chalkdust with videos for geometry (Prof B doesn't offer geometry). I will also use Chalkdust for Pre-Calc, which my son has to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some programs have more support for teaching such as a script to follow, a video, or a computer teaching piece.

 

Mostly though I think you have to figure out which program speaks to you as a teacher. Just because one parent who "isn't good at math" meshes well with one method doesn't mean you will even if you're also "not good at math." For some parents, it's a chance to relearn math in a new way and with a new attitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this order, starting with most favorite:

 

1. Teaching Textbooks with Aleks

 

2. CLE (completely scripted for the parent.)

 

3. MUS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to do every problem along with my younger son, to get his through high-school math. The older son was actually behind the younger son, so I didn't need to redo every problem with him.

 

Now, any series I seriously adopt, I work along with, or ahead of the most advanced student. Working ahead is even better that working along.

 

Saxon is doable for a math phobic mom. One problem at a time. READ the books. Skip the dvds if you don't have time to read and watch. I think the textbook writer is a better teacher than the dvd makers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I failed prealgebra (and retook it in the summer), failed Algebra I (and retook it in the summer), failed geometry (and retook it the next year), and got a D in Algebra II. So, you might say that I went into this homeschooling math thing a little nervous about my ability to teach *any* math.

 

Among homeschoolers, the inclination seems to be to farm out the subjects we aren't comfortable with. I disagree with this approach when "farm out" means to use a program like TT that is really just a bunch of videos. When the kid has a question and there is no human to answer it, what then?

 

I solved this problem by working ahead of my son. I jump started my understanding by going through ALEKS Algebra I. Then I worked ahead of my son in Jacobs Algebra. I did ALEKS Geometry. And then, even though we ended up using TT Geometry, I watched all the videos with him to ensure that I could answer questions, offer feedback on the problem sets, and actually grade the exams. Then I worked through Lial's Intermediate Algebra ahead of him so that I could teach the material and answer questions. When I farmed out precalculus, it was to Derek Owens, who does the grading and is available for questions.

 

It was a lot of work, but it was worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I agree with EKS in general on this (I'm not a huge fan of farming out), I've come to realize that when a child is gifted in an area that a parent struggles in, it may indeed be time to farm it out. I do study to mastery anything I do not remember, ahead of my eldest, but that doesn't translate well to teaching it to her. She just *gets* math - but she is also dyslexic and can't always teach herself from a scripted explanation in a textbook. My way of doing things (very formulaic) only frustrates her, but so does a conceptual program that explains every. little. thing. Lol.

We're doing (another) prealgebra program while I hunt down the best Algebra 1 for her. Ideally I would use Jacob's or similar, but I'm not sure that our relationship can withstand another year of me teaching her directly, lol (okay, it can, but we need less stress between us). Tabletclass is currently front and center (and is a great choice beyond grade 6 math, like you are looking for) - unfortunately my daughter wants nothing to do with a computer based class, so we'll see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Khan Academy and Maria Miller's videos have been very helpful to me. I'm not bad at math but my schooling did not leave me with a very strong conceptual understanding of why the various algorithms worked. It is embarrassing how much I have learned from using the various Asian-based programs (Singapore, MM, Right Start) and it's all been pre-algebra or below :blushing:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MathUSee if he struggles with math.

 

ChalkDust if he is more advanced.

 

Videos for both are excellent, but ChalkDust covers more ground and is more advanced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Khan Academy and Maria Miller's videos have been very helpful to me. I'm not bad at math but my schooling did not leave me with a very strong conceptual understanding of why the various algorithms worked. It is embarrassing how much I have learned from using the various Asian-based programs (Singapore, MM, Right Start) and it's all been pre-algebra or below :blushing:

 

 

I have never been terrible at math, but I definitely went through school and college with math anxiety, so I've never excelled at it either. I was definitely like a skittish horse about it. I learned a ton from going through Miquon with my kid. No joke. LOL. There were serious "ah so that's all that means" moments. I'm not embarrassed about it.

 

I realized that I hated math because I'm a very conceptual learner and a kinesthetic learner. All my life math was "this is right, this is wrong, this is how you do it, memorize it, pass the test." Doing Miquon with my kid really helped me get comfortable with finding the concepts, the ideas behind it and getting past a right/wrong memorize the procedure mentality.

 

So I would say Miquon could be a good fit for a math-phobic parent. Also SM. My oldest is doing Saxon 5/4 now and I don't find that an issue either.

 

I do read a few lessons ahead and get it straight in my mind that I can explain it to my kid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am terrible with Math. We are using Horizons this year and my 4th grader's Math is already over my head most days. There is a reason for this, but I won't go into all of the details here. Suffice to say that in 3rd grade, I was put into the foster care system and the rest of my life I was in 'survival mode'. Math was the least of my worries. Anyway, thankfully, my husband is a Math wiz so he currently picks up my slack. However, I feel most days that I am shorting DD10 because she herself is also very mathy. So because of this we have decided to go with Teaching Textbooks and Khan Academy for next year. DD10 will be going from Horizons 4 to TT7 next year. We will use Khan Academy to fill in any holes or gaps as we go along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loving the suggestions in this thread. Lots of food for thought for me, for the future.

 

I agree with the PP's who said to learn just ahead of your kids. That's exactly what I'll have to do, and while the challenge is a bit daunting, I know it will be worth it. At that point I'll have to research the programs mentioned here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see that learning ahead could help, but that doesnt help me learn what I dont get, lol

 

 

I collect math books and use them as REFERENCE books, just like encyclopedias. I learned to READ math textbooks. When I get stuck in one book, I read another book. The reason why it's better to work ahead, is to have time to work through the stuck, without having a waiting child sitting next to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am totally picking up what you are throwing down. I keep hearing that it is just an opportunity for me to relearn math. That's nice, but I just want to be realistic about my comfort level and doing the best I can for my child. I don't know guitar either. I have no talent there. Realistically, I am not going to learn one lesson above her to teach her how to play guitar.

 

We started with Math Mammoth, and although I think it is probably a great program, there was just not enough hand-holding for me as a teacher. We just switched to CLE. Much better fit for both of us, at this stage.

 

I have no doubt we will someday end up using Math-U-See or Teaching Textbooks, and most likely, math tutoring. I am fine with that! I am just thankful there are programs out there that will help me, as a math-phobic mother, continue to homeschool. I will not feel guilty about using those resources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will not feel guilty about using those resources.

 

 

And you shouldn't!

 

I didn't have any outside help and couldn't even feed and clothe my kids properly. Our home was 50 degrees and we had no health insurance. There were not going to be any tutors to bail me out, and PS was not an option for my passive-aggressive 2E kid.

 

If you have the resources for your children to learn things that you are not learning too, go for it! For my kids, either I taught it, they taught themselves, or they didn't learn it. Period!

 

Use what have, and use it well, whatever that is!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one should feel guilty about it if they need to or choose to use a program that farms out the teaching... for any subject. I agree that we should be glad those exist.

 

On the other hand, I think it's good to consider whether it's something you can take on and whether it's worth it. The higher up you go in math, the harder that can be, but I think especially with a really foundational subject like math, there can also be a potential payoff. And no matter what you do, I think if we as teachers have a subject that we dislike or that is difficult, it's important for us to think about how can we change those dynamics for our kids and not let our own attitudes or issues affect them. I know the name of John Dewey is rarely invoked in these parts, but one of the things I think he really had right was how much a teacher's attitude toward a subject can rub off on the student. If we come at math nervous and fearful, then our kids will take something away from that. Again, it may be the way to approach it with confidence for some parents is to show how they can do it alongside their children and for others, it may be to guide them to the right resources, like TT, that teach for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I agree that "learn a lesson ahead" is a good concept. But sometimes you have to choose where to put your energy. I am finding that doing high school is demanding enough that I have chosen self-teaching math curricula for my students. However, I did put in the time teaching in the lower grades, and I have a mathy husband to fall back on. The children know to ask him when he gets home from work if they didn't understand something, and he meets with them once a week.

 

I chose to put my time into doing course descriptions, designing WTM-purist Great Books history/literature courses, doing tough literature right along side them, designing worldview courses, helping them with NCFCA debate (the research mom of the club, going to lots of tournaments, and judging lots of debate), and keeping up with grading. I also coordinate their Greek course with their tutor, and get them to that, and get my daughter to her supplemental Latin translation tutor.

 

And that doesn't count all of my other duties outside of homeschooling, in my home, church, and the homeschooling community. Frankly, I don't have any brain cells left to try to work alongside/ahead in math, which I have cried buckets over since first grade all the way through suffering through Algebra II. And we do straightforward Apologia science, with my husband doing the experiments.

 

I've actually chosen to put my energy in my area of strength, humanities, which I care much more about, and design what I think is the best program for my children. I decided to cut my losses in math and science. It's actually fairly unusual to try to be carrying just about a full load in addition to speech and debate, but we already had our four-year plan and had completed one year of it, so I decided to adjust slightly but try to keep close to a full school schedule. Originally, my plan had been to take the higher maths alongside my children, with my husband being the tutor, but now that I'm here, there just aren't any brain cells left over. I had to pick my battles. So, YMMV. Everyone's situation is different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would also like to add that tableclass has been an outstanding choice for my son. When the owner takes the time to call you and explain his program, that is what I call "customer service" at it's best. The teacher is a genius at explaining math so kids understand it. The thing I like the best about it is that the videos are not your usual 8-10 minutes long. Most of his videos on each math concept is at least 20 minutes long and I think that is what sets tabletclass a part from several others out there like Thinkwell which was another program I was interested in getting, however, I liked the longer video instruction. I don't think 10 minutes is enough. To give you a better understanding about it, this is the order in which your child works independently. Watch the 20 minute video. Complete the problems. Check the problems which will show how to get the correct answer. Mr. Zimmerman works on a white board so as he explains, students are able to see what he is doing. He also continues to point out common mistakes along the way. At the end of each section, there is a practice test and final test. So far, it has worked great for my 6th grader. Feel free to ask any questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am really interested in this thread as I look ahead for my boys. We are using MM now and all is going well. I am not strong in Math but work ahead with my boys and so far I feel comfortable. I am starting to look ahead to Pre-Algebra, Algebra, Geo and Calculus and have seen many names bounced around. I was wondering if those with some experience with these could tell me about them? Specifically, things like whether they are strickly textbooks, or CD /DVD teaching included, what courses they cover and if you would consider them good for average, remedial or advanced students?

-Lial's

-Jacob's

-Dolciani

-Forester

-ALEKS

-Derek Owens

-Tabletclass

-Tobey and Slater

-AoPS

-TT

 

Thanks for any help you can provide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I THINK this is it but I can be definitely wrong...so someone correct me if I am wrong!

 

 

 

 

-Lial's-average

-Jacob's-remedial

-Dolciani-average

-Forester-average

These are all textbooks.

Forester has videos or something like that connected to it ---Math Without Borders

ALEKS-remedial, online learning

-Derek Owens-average, videos, distance learning

-Tabletclass-???

-Tobey and Slater-???

-AoPS-Advanced

-TT-remedial

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I THINK this is it but I can be definitely wrong...so someone correct me if I am wrong!

 

 

 

 

-Lial's-average

-Jacob's-remedial

-Dolciani-average

-Forester-average

These are all textbooks.

Forester has videos or something like that connected to it ---Math Without Borders

ALEKS-remedial, online learning

-Derek Owens-average, videos, distance learning

-Tabletclass-???

-Tobey and Slater-???

-AoPS-Advanced

-TT-remedial

 

 

Jacobs is not remedial.

Foerster and Dolciani are definitely suitable for honors classes. They can be used for non-honors classes as well -- they are just good, solid all-round textbooks.

Math without Borders is video lessons that a guy named David Chandler made around the Algebra texts. I haven't seen them but I have heard good things about them.

ALEKS is more of a supplement, the teaching is definitely inferior but it's great for practice.

AOPS is not just advanced, but for math-mad kids who can't get enough. There are plenty of others which are also perfectly suitable for kids headed for STEM careers. AOPS is really best suited to the kind of kid whose mother frequently says 'What am I going to DO with this kid who's flying through math and begging for more?!'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Khan Academy and Maria Miller's videos have been very helpful to me. I'm not bad at math but my schooling did not leave me with a very strong conceptual understanding of why the various algorithms worked. It is embarrassing how much I have learned from using the various Asian-based programs (Singapore, MM, Right Start) and it's all been pre-algebra or below :blushing:

 

This. I am marching along fine thusfar....through the end of sixth grade. Singapore has retaught me math in a conceptual way. My goal for pre-algebra on is to look high and low for math programs which are a good match for my kids and myself. Next year I will have two students in pre-algebra. One will be using a Dolciani text, and one will likely be doing AoPS (or SM level 6, whichever I settle on). They have different needs. I am comfortable with language arts through the end of high school, but I expect my kids to pass me in math at some point. At that point, I will gratefully outsource to the community college (which has high school math courses) or utilize another outsourcing option. I do not plan to attempt to master the advanced math I did not master the first time around in order to teach my kids. I am very much at peace with this decision. :) ETA: If I look at a math program, and I don't like it, I don't use it. It needs to make sense to me in order to make the cut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I collect math books and use them as REFERENCE books, just like encyclopedias. I learned to READ math textbooks. When I get stuck in one book, I read another book. The reason why it's better to work ahead, is to have time to work through the stuck, without having a waiting child sitting next to you.

 

I'd like to know what your favorites are, Hunter. For 6th grade and up! We're in 5th CLE right now and while CLE is getting the job done, sometimes I could just use an alternative way....with pics! So, any recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is BJU or Abeka Math very scripted? We are using Horizons currently and the kids LOVE it. But I am not strong in math at all. One of my kids is a math natural, even taught himself Multiplication in 1st grade before it was ever taught as a concept. I have started looking into what to use for 5th, 6th, etc that I can teach correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are loving the levels of Saxon from 5/4 and up. Ds does well reading the teaching in the text, doing the problems on his own, and (this is what really won me over) he self-corrects using the solutions manual. It requires nothing from me and has been awesome for ds. The solutions manual has been awesome for us, since it means that not only does it give the answer but also how to get the answer. The teaching in the text is incremental and you gotta be ok with getting little pieces of the puzzle at a time, and all the review is just what my ds needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is BJU or Abeka Math very scripted? We are using Horizons currently and the kids LOVE it. But I am not strong in math at all. One of my kids is a math natural, even taught himself Multiplication in 1st grade before it was ever taught as a concept. I have started looking into what to use for 5th, 6th, etc that I can teach correctly.

BJU is scripted. I don't know about Abeka. CLE teaches to the student and bypasses a lot of scripting where you can get bogged down with, also helpful for non mathy people. Like...um.......me! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...