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Crimson Wife

Stanford Class of 2017 Acceptance Rate: 5.7%, Lowest Ever

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Then please explain to me why CS graduates from my oldest's school (a SMALL, private Christian college not generally ranked in the top anything) get starting salaries in the mid 5 and at least once in the low 6 digits - often with multiple offers to choose from?

 

There's also a HUGE difference between saying Top 50 and Ivy equivalent or bust. The companies you list may only recruit at Top 50, but I bet if you look at actual employees, they will take a talented person from anywhere. Some may not even require a degree for CS - just good experience and ability.

 

I can name kids from my high school who currently work in finance, art, graphic design and various other fields with decent salaries - yet didn't go to Top 50 schools. They don't always stay in the local area either.

 

To anyone looking, if in doubt about where graduates from School X can go - ask where recent graduates have gone. School A is not equal to School B, but if both School A and School B get graduates where you want to be, either can work. Then fit can come into play.

 

It is ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE that you NEED a great tippy top school name for undergrad to get a great job - not for most fields anyway. Investment banking in NYC tends to be the only exception I hear of (and investment banking elsewhere is not as picky). Some professions do prefer top names for grad school, but kids from many schools get into top grad schools - right alongside those students from top name undergrads.

 

Thank you for saying this. Dh's Computer Science degree is from an LAC and it wasn't a top 50 school. He's been actively recruited from ALL of the big players in the field. We do not like West Coast living and so have shunned the offers from Microsoft and "Silicon Valley". He has worked for all of the big consulting companies, IBM, EDS before it was purchased by HP, HP, etc. - now he's working as an executive in a HUGE firm that has decided to bring all of it's IT in house and maintain it's own department - and not once in his employement career has he been discriminated against for his college of choice. He works with two ivy grads who came into the IT world at about the same time he did. They work for him and make a lot less money too.

 

Oh, and dh's under grad degree did not seem off putting to Stanford when he was accepted to grad school there. He declined because well, as I said before, we hated west coast living and couldn't wait to pack the moving truck and go back east.

 

All that said, at any top 100 school, acceptance is like black jack...you may know the game and be good a playing it, but there is an element of luck you can't account for! I'd love to be a fly on the wall in some of these admissions departments.

 

"So Joe, this year we are looking for a student from zip code X who only eats jelly beans and spinach, plays rugby and the zither, volunteered in an orphanage in Zimbabwe, has only one sibling and that person must play the pipe organ and has already published a novel, whose father is a pathologist and whose mother owns a greenhouse, and the student's mother must be willing to landscape the lawn in front of Delta House. Now go...find me such a person."

 

Okay, possibly not that extreme! :D But, with many colleges, it kind of has that feel to it.

 

Sometimes we need to just breathe and admit that to a huge extent, future success has a lot more to do with how well our kids apply themselves, think outside the box, adapt, create, and interview than it does where their degree came from.

 

Faith

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Personally, I think that five or six should be enough.

 

I agree with you, and my kids have all applied to six or less.

 

BUT -- if you are dependent on merit aid, the process really is a lottery. Casting your net wide is wise, as demonstrated by both my kid's experience and the story of the valedictorian rejected by UNC but accepted by Duke with a full-rdie merit scholarship.

 

And accceptance to a school that accepts less than 10% of applicants is a lottery. Does the school have enough trombone players? Is it looking to beef up its drama program? Does it want more students from State X? The top schools have more than enough applicants who are acdemically qualified, so when considering the pool of "qualified aplicants," the school ends up looking at a wide variety of qualities when deciding whom to admit.

 

And in a lottery, the person with more tickets is statistically favored.....

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Here's the flip side of this:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/got-now-please-come-232500824.html;_ylt=AwrNUbFqxWVRhQ4ATw3QtDMD

 

On another group I am on someone posted the idea that by spiraling up on numbers of applications each student submits we get the low acceptance rates, but because students apply to so many schools this is followed up by low enrollment rates. This hit both schools and students, and in my opinion there is only way down and that is for both to back down.

 

Decide in advance how many schools your student will apply to and stick with that. If necessary you could go up one school, but make the student decide.

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Here's the flip side of this:

http://finance.yahoo...WVRhQ4ATw3QtDMD

 

On another group I am on someone posted the idea that by spiraling up on numbers of applications each student submits we get the low acceptance rates, but because students apply to so many schools this is followed up by low enrollment rates. This hit both schools and students, and in my opinion there is only way down and that is for both to back down.

 

Decide in advance how many schools your student will apply to and stick with that. If necessary you could go up one school, but make the student decide.

 

That links to the same article mentioned in post 98 of this thread. ;)

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the idea that many colleges make money off applications is put to rest.

 

 

It worries me that there is a layer of businesses between the applying student and the college - the college board company, whoever owns the systems used by the common app, the various rating systems, advertising agencies, etc. If someone is going to make money from the students applying to a particular college, I would rather it were that particular college. It feels like there is a layer in the middle taking money from both parties (but I might be wrong?). College is expensive enough without adding that layer. I understand why colleges might like to pay someone to do some of the sorting for them by aquiring and distributing test scores, and I understand that the original idea behind the testing was to even up people's chances a bit, but it has become rather a powerful, self-perpetuating entity, especially when put together with other self-perpetuating entity like businesses involved with the common app. Put together with the invasive CSS form, the potential for mining the data is huge. The potential privacy issue is huge. What a lot of trust we all seem to have in "the system".

 

I like that some colleges are test-optional. I like that some colleges use their own application. I like that there is a snail-mail option for the common app. It just so happened that we were able to minimize our participation in this middle layer but part of that was just the sort of colleges that interested my children. Mine took only the PSAT and SAT. They avoided the common app where possible and when they needed it, we downloaded it, filled it in, printed it, and snail-mailed it. It is Kludgy and glitchy but it can be done. We did it because we had too many attachments for my husband's liking. He works with systems of paperwork. It was rather nice not to have to bother with more tests or the whole online application system, though. It felt more straightforward, somehow.

 

I am waiting to see if the system positive-feeback-s itself until it self-destructs or whether the participants will decide not to play the game and seek alternate routes.

 

Nan

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I like that there is a snail-mail option for the common app.

Nan

 

 

Just FYI for those reading this who have children applying to college this coming fall of 2013 -- The Common App is doing away with the option to print out and mail in the forms. It all has to be submitted on-line. Here is a link to a memo describing some of the changes:

 

https://www.commonap...CA4/AppMemo.pdf

 

Brenda

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Just FYI for those reading this who have children applying to college this coming fall of 2013 -- The Common App is doing away with the option to print out and mail in the forms. It all has to be submitted on-line. Here is a link to a memo describing some of the changes:

 

https://www.commonap...CA4/AppMemo.pdf

 

Brenda

 

Grrrrr...

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Just FYI for those reading this who have children applying to college this coming fall of 2013 -- The Common App is doing away with the option to print out and mail in the forms. It all has to be submitted on-line. Here is a link to a memo describing some of the changes:

 

https://www.commonap...CA4/AppMemo.pdf

 

Brenda

 

Nooooooo! Despite three older kids and 14 college apps, I have somehow only been involved in three or four online apps. I was hoping to go the snail-mail route this time too.

 

:scared: :banghead: :scared:

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That links to the same article mentioned in post 98 of this thread. ;)

 

Sorry ! I missed that. Please forgive me.

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Sorry ! I missed that. Please forgive me.

 

 

Eh - nothing to forgive to be honest. I can't count the number of times I've missed things... so I'll admit to considering it "normal" (and if not, don't blow my illusion!!!).

 

I just thought if you wanted to see some of the discussions about it you might want to go back and see a couple of the posts immediately afterward.

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Eh - nothing to forgive to be honest. I can't count the number of times I've missed things... so I'll admit to considering it "normal" (and if not, don't blow my illusion!!!).

 

I just thought if you wanted to see some of the discussions about it you might want to go back and see a couple of the posts immediately afterward.

 

I did go back and look!

 

I feel like someone needs to tell both sides to stand down. BUT I am definitely more cynical about the college side because they have big financial incentives to get more and more people to apply. Students see their whole life down the drain and get scared.

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This has me counting my blessings. Hubby has always been able to relocate anywhere we want (more or less). There are definitely benefits to having a job that is needed, literally, everywhere. (Civil engineering to anyone who is curious - if there's water, wastewater, or environmental stuff and people, someone designs it.)

 

 

That's cool ... and guess what my older son has decided to major in? (he'll start college this fall) -- civil engineering! :D

Definitely a versatile major!

 

But we're not complaining about my husband's narrow physics specialty -- more just stating a fact. He did an extended "post-doc" at a place like CERN; both of our sons were born in Europe. It was incredibly lovely, and we got to learn another language. If it weren't for family here, and the high COL there, we might still be overseas ... :)

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