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Bree

? about SPD dd

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So my dd is 6 and has SPD and some attention issues. She can listen better I have noticed when she is by herself. So thinking about school for her next year I was wondering if combining her with her big brother would ever work or I should keep her separate from him. She is strong in math and reading but we tend to have a harder time with the other subjects. She is only going to be in 1st grade next year so I know what is important is her 3R's...guess I am just looking for advice since she is so different from my older ds :) THanks.

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I'd definately not put them together. I would focus on building her attention span. It will be important as you go on. I'd also add in as many sensory things as you both can handle to help her integrate them as much as possible. As you move through the year you will have a better idea of what subjects you might be able to include both children in. We've had limited success with inclution of Science, History projects and Literature (readers theater type stuff).

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Hi Amy, since Nita already gave you the letdown on the combining issue, I'll just toss out my empathy. Btdt. Just enjoy it is all I can say. Kids seem kind of (insert your word) when you start comparing them to someone else or who you want them to be, but they're actually ok when just considered by themselves. So I wouldn't yearn for what *isn't* or hope to combine just because someone else does with their horde of littles. You're doing things the right way keeping them separate and keeping each child functional. She's going to need structure and predictability, and it's hard to get that structure if things are changing or she's waiting or she's rushed or... Just looking at their materials, you can see a big gap. I just wouldn't at all expect them to blend.

 

My one bit of hindsight, for what it's worth, is that my dd remembers everything from that age that we DID. When in doubt, defer to something she can DO. (do with her hands, crafts, activities, manipulate, experiments, etc.) Btw, not that you asked, but I don't think SWB's grammar and WWE stuff would have been at all good for my dd. Dictation was good, but WWE is very distinctly linked to working memory (unless you unlink it). Your dd is likely to have working memory issues. When you say things are a hard plow aside from reading and math, well there might be reasons for that. I don't think WWE is worth it in that sense (heresy!). I think something that works on working memory is good, and dictation is good, but they don't have to be connected with SN kids. And SWB's grammar, well that came out after my dd was past that stage. FLL1/2 was fine (we did that), but I would only use it to memorize the defs. After that I'd go more hands-on, something with spiral, something with super short sessions where they can touch and interact with it. In the earliest level of Shurley you actually cut out pictures of different word types (verbs, nouns, etc.). You can make labels for the parts of speech and label sentences. Shurley has nice, short lessons with only 3 words a day to parse. We did them orally and then diagrammed *1* on a whiteboard. We labeled them sometimes with movable labels on our whiteboard. Shake it up. Touch the grammar and interact with it. What's popular is not necessarily going to be good for these kids.

 

Well good luck to you. I haven't decided if it gets easier or harder, lol. I thought it was hard then, then there was a lull, and now frankly it sort of leaves you racking your brain. :)

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Hi Amy, since Nita already gave you the letdown on the combining issue, I'll just toss out my empathy. Btdt. Just enjoy it is all I can say. Kids seem kind of (insert your word) when you start comparing them to someone else or who you want them to be, but they're actually ok when just considered by themselves. So I wouldn't yearn for what *isn't* or hope to combine just because someone else does with their horde of littles. You're doing things the right way keeping them separate and keeping each child functional. She's going to need structure and predictability, and it's hard to get that structure if things are changing or she's waiting or she's rushed or... Just looking at their materials, you can see a big gap. I just wouldn't at all expect them to blend.

 

My one bit of hindsight, for what it's worth, is that my dd remembers everything from that age that we DID. When in doubt, defer to something she can DO. (do with her hands, crafts, activities, manipulate, experiments, etc.) Btw, not that you asked, but I don't think SWB's grammar and WWE stuff would have been at all good for my dd. Dictation was good, but WWE is very distinctly linked to working memory (unless you unlink it). Your dd is likely to have working memory issues. When you say things are a hard plow aside from reading and math, well there might be reasons for that. I don't think WWE is worth it in that sense (heresy!). I think something that works on working memory is good, and dictation is good, but they don't have to be connected with SN kids. And SWB's grammar, well that came out after my dd was past that stage. FLL1/2 was fine (we did that), but I would only use it to memorize the defs. After that I'd go more hands-on, something with spiral, something with super short sessions where they can touch and interact with it. In the earliest level of Shurley you actually cut out pictures of different word types (verbs, nouns, etc.). You can make labels for the parts of speech and label sentences. Shurley has nice, short lessons with only 3 words a day to parse. We did them orally and then diagrammed *1* on a whiteboard. We labeled them sometimes with movable labels on our whiteboard. Shake it up. Touch the grammar and interact with it. What's popular is not necessarily going to be good for these kids.

 

Well good luck to you. I haven't decided if it gets easier or harder, lol. I thought it was hard then, then there was a lull, and now frankly it sort of leaves you racking your brain. :)

 

OhE, what level of Shurley are you talking about here?

 

I have a sensory girl, too, in this age range who also has writing issues and we've recently found great success with using plastic letters to do ETC, so the Shurley description sounds really nice.

 

OP, my dd has a good attention/focus when she's alone but she can get terribly frustrated when my other kids are around her. We have a pretty big age gap so working with them together isn't really practical but even if they were closer in age, I'd probably have to separate them to be able to work efficiently. I think efficiently is the key word. It's tempting to put them together to save time and extra work but it could create enough trouble that it doesn't really help on a regular basis.

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Tiramisu--All the levels of Shurley 2 through 6 are pretty similar in format and that's pretty much how we worked with all of them, busting out the whiteboard to diagram or make it real, using the optional practice workbook, etc. Worked well for us. Bought AG at the convention this week, so we'll see how that goes. THAT is efficient, lol. I told Erin, I kept looking at it every year, trying to figure out why I would bother if I was just going to have to teach it. Now I think she's ready to do it for herself. So hopefully we can get through it and then go into the reinforcement books. Dd is pretty excited about them, since she likes the themes.

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