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Have we discussed this yet? Changes to NC Homeschool law.


MinivanMom
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Basically, the political environment in NC is one that no-one would have predicted a few years ago - a relatively homeschool-friendly governor and legislature. So some of the politically active homeschoolers decided it would be a good time to try to get the homeschool law modified to say something along the lines of parents will direct the education of their children. The current law requires the parents to provide the instruction with the exception that you can have a 2-family homeschool. Because of this restriction, classes offered for homeschoolers in NC typically meet only one day per week. The proposed modification would expand our options for outside classes and supplementation.

 

ETA: Here is a quote from my local homeschool group:

 

Bills were filed yesterday (3/5) in both the NC House and Senate which would expand the legal definition of homeschooling in NC, from specifying that parents/guardians "provide the instruction" to parents/guardians "determine scope & sequence.. provide academic instruction and determine additional sources of academic instruction."

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I'm following it.

 

Here's the State Senate Bill w/proposed changes.

Here's the State House Bill w/proposed changes.

 

Basically, the new law would give homeschool parents the freedom to decide which classes to teach themselves and which classes to outsource. Currently, the law reads that classes must be taught by parents.

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The negative chatter is about bringing the homeschool law to the attention of the lawmakers in the first place. We don't have much regulation here and many worry that it will come under greater scrutiny, which might lead to increased regulation.

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The negative chatter is about bringing the homeschool law to the attention of the lawmakers in the first place. We don't have much regulation here and many worry that it will come under greater scrutiny, which might lead to increased regulation.

 

Yes, that's exactly right and well stated. Many thought that it's worked fine to now and we really do have freedoms other states don't have so leave it alone. Why send up a red flag that may actually backfire on us. To one of the pp's - classes here in Charlotte are usually 2 or 3 days when outsourced at a homeschool friendly academy, etc. There are other classes that meet once a week though. Didn't it have something to do with sports or am I getting this confused with something else? When will a decision be made?
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Yes, that's exactly right and well stated. Many thought that it's worked fine to now and we really do have freedoms other states don't have so leave it alone. Why send up a red flag that may actually backfire on us. To one of the pp's - classes here in Charlotte are usually 2 or 3 days when outsourced at a homeschool friendly academy, etc. There are other classes that meet once a week though. Didn't it have something to do with sports or am I getting this confused with something else? When will a decision be made?

 

 

Right now people who have their NC homeschooled high schoolers dual enrolled in community college or are otherwise outsourcing core classes like math and science are technically doing so illegally. Currently, the law states that parents must be the ones providing the instruction of core classes. Most of the parents of high schoolers I know (including me) think this is a good change.

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Yes, that's exactly right and well stated. Many thought that it's worked fine to now and we really do have freedoms other states don't have so leave it alone. Why send up a red flag that may actually backfire on us. To one of the pp's - classes here in Charlotte are usually 2 or 3 days when outsourced at a homeschool friendly academy, etc. There are other classes that meet once a week though. Didn't it have something to do with sports or am I getting this confused with something else? When will a decision be made?

 

I think the legislature will be discussing the bills on Tuesday. AFAIK, this proposed change has nothing to do with sports. There is nothing about sports in the proposed revisions.

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There is another proposed bill floating around to allow homeschoolers in NC to participate n public school sports programs. I'm fuzzy on the actual wording and its status.

 

Here is State House the bill on sports. I haven't read it, our family isn't interested in high school sports. There is not a similar bill in the State Senate at this time.

 

Here is a State House bill on a tax credit for homeschoolers. Like the sports bill, there isn't a similar bill in the State Senate at this time.

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Right now people who have their NC homeschooled high schoolers dual enrolled in community college or are otherwise outsourcing core classes like math and science are technically doing so illegally. Currently, the law states that parents must be the ones providing the instruction of core classes. Most of the parents of high schoolers I know (including me) think this is a good change.

 

True, but this is where it gets dicey - interpretation of the law. I spoke with Rod when he was in charge about 5 years ago during the time I was starting a co-op. The law is very ambiguous as to the definition of teaching. For example, I teach my dd everything, but she could go to co-op and still take core classes as long as I was providing the greater percentage of instruction. It seemed so odd b/c how on earth can one define down to the minute how much time is spent on any subject? My sn dd has adhd and can not sit through a subject at home. She'll do math problems (and maybe get most of it done), but get up pat the cat and/or dog and go back to math OR a completely different subject. It would be nice to have the NC h's law a little more defined, but I do like the freedoms we have here. I wouldn't want someone to dictate curricula, etc....otherwise how does that differ from p.s.
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I've been following this with great interest as there is a chance we will be relocated to the Charlotte area and I'd like to know whether it would be better for us to live in SC or NC. Also, I desire for homeschool freedoms to be preserved everywhere. It does appear to me that HSLDA supports this new legislation. I know that I want someone else to lead on high school science labs, so I like the idea of the new proposed law. It seems like SC is moving toward tighter homeschool regulation, but NC has legislators that are supportive towards homeschoolers. I also like another NC proposed bill in which a $2500 tax credit per child per year is offered. I see that HSLDA supports this bill also, which surprised me a bit as I thought that once the government starts giving money to homeschoolers, then they will start demanding more from homeschoolers.

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Right now people who have their NC homeschooled high schoolers dual enrolled in community college or are otherwise outsourcing core classes like math and science are technically doing so illegally. Currently, the law states that parents must be the ones providing the instruction of core classes. Most of the parents of high schoolers I know (including me) think this is a good change.

 

 

This was my understanding of the proposed change to the law after reading it, but I didn't know if I was missing something. I understand the fear of additional scrutiny leading to additional regulation, but a lot of the chatter I'm hearing is specifically anti-NCHE. There seems to be a feel that the (protestant) christian community is acting unilaterally without the input of the entire homeschooling community. I didn't even realize that NCHE was a (protestant) christian organization until I started reading the emails going around our homeschool group. I feel like there must be some history and bad blood that I'm missing here based on how suspicious many secular homeschoolers are about NCHE's motives. On the surface, I think the changes look like a good thing.

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This was my understanding of the proposed change to the law after reading it, but I didn't know if I was missing something. I understand the fear of additional scrutiny leading to additional regulation, but a lot of the chatter I'm hearing is specifically anti-NCHE. There seems to be a feel that the (protestant) christian community is acting unilaterally without the input of the entire homeschooling community. I didn't even realize that NCHE was a (protestant) christian organization until I started reading the emails going around our homeschool group. I feel like there must be some history and bad blood that I'm missing here based on how suspicious many secular homeschoolers are about NCHE's motives. On the surface, I think the changes look like a good thing.

 

 

It bothers secular homeschoolers that certain groups (like HSLDA and NCHE) purport to represent the wants and desires of *all* homeschoolers, especially when they sometimes advocate on issues that have nothing to do with homeschooling.

 

Ed to make sense, lol

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This was my understanding of the proposed change to the law after reading it, but I didn't know if I was missing something. I understand the fear of additional scrutiny leading to additional regulation, but a lot of the chatter I'm hearing is specifically anti-NCHE. There seems to be a feel that the (protestant) christian community is acting unilaterally without the input of the entire homeschooling community. I didn't even realize that NCHE was a (protestant) christian organization until I started reading the emails going around our homeschool group. I feel like there must be some history and bad blood that I'm missing here based on how suspicious many secular homeschoolers are about NCHE's motives. On the surface, I think the changes look like a good thing.

 

 

I don't know if it's even possible to get input from the entire homeschool community, much less any sort of agreement.

 

Is there even a secular statewide group? All I've heard of is NCHE, and frankly, I'm not impressed. Its leaders try to hard to show how well homeschoolers are complying with the current law, to the extent of recommending over-compliance.

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This was my understanding of the proposed change to the law after reading it, but I didn't know if I was missing something. I understand the fear of additional scrutiny leading to additional regulation, but a lot of the chatter I'm hearing is specifically anti-NCHE. There seems to be a feel that the (protestant) christian community is acting unilaterally without the input of the entire homeschooling community. I didn't even realize that NCHE was a (protestant) christian organization until I started reading the emails going around our homeschool group. I feel like there must be some history and bad blood that I'm missing here based on how suspicious many secular homeschoolers are about NCHE's motives. On the surface, I think the changes look like a good thing.

 

I've actually been seeing a lot of anti-NCHE chatter amongst Christian homeschoolers who are not members. They also are complaining that NCHE acted secretly, without input of the entire homeschooling community. To be honest, I really don't think NCHE leaders were acting secretly. I don't even live in NC, I am not an NCHE member, and I still knew that they were thinking about requesting the changes (before the official proposals were made). I am a member of a NC-based group that keeps its members well-informed about the status of the proposition. We do not have any members on the NCHE board. I wonder if communication is really where the problem lies, rather than intentional exclusion.

 

FWIW, I think now is the time to make changes. The "under the radar" co-op & dual enrollment classes could be challenged any minute, and the current wording of the law is not favorable to homeschoolers. Yes, I know that right now homeschoolers can get by with doing what they want--but it's because their activities are being ignored, not because it's legal. That situation could change on a dime. I would think that more favorable wording would be a positive change, and there is no better time than the present, considering the current make-up of the legislature. We hope to move to NC in the near future, but the current NC homeschooling law is not one of the things that draws us in that direction. (We're in TN under Option 3 with a whole lot of educational freedom.)

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I just heard that the House Education Committee met today and passed HB230 without any changes or amendments. I would be curious to see the transcript of the meeting, but I don't know if that is something they post online. I think the next step would be the full House vote. Does anyone know whether they could still change or amend the bill at this point?

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I've actually been seeing a lot of anti-NCHE chatter amongst Christian homeschoolers who are not members. They also are complaining that NCHE acted secretly, without input of the entire homeschooling community. To be honest, I really don't think NCHE leaders were acting secretly. I don't even live in NC, I am not an NCHE member, and I still knew that they were thinking about requesting the changes (before the official proposals were made). I am a member of a NC-based group that keeps its members well-informed about the status of the proposition. We do not have any members on the NCHE board. I wonder if communication is really where the problem lies, rather than intentional exclusion.

 

FWIW, I think now is the time to make changes. The "under the radar" co-op & dual enrollment classes could be challenged any minute, and the current wording of the law is not favorable to homeschoolers. Yes, I know that right now homeschoolers can get by with doing what they want--but it's because their activities are being ignored, not because it's legal. That situation could change on a dime. I would think that more favorable wording would be a positive change, and there is no better time than the present, considering the current make-up of the legislature. We hope to move to NC in the near future, but the current NC homeschooling law is not one of the things that draws us in that direction. (We're in TN under Option 3 with a whole lot of educational freedom.)

:iagree:

 

I remember seeing NCHE requested meetings in every region in the state before proceeding looking for input. They've been pretty transparent through the whole process.

I say this as someone who isn't a huge fan of their state conference because it's more like a worldview conference than a homeschool convention. I don't think they mean any ill will though. This change was partially in response to a change in the leader of the NCDNPE who interpreted the law a little more narrowly? (I could have this backwards) than the previous director. The idea being that while we have a friendly legislative environment for homeschoolers - including the Governor - that now would be the time to have a bill with clear language. I support it as I think what is allowed needs to be clearly spelled out. My oldest has a tutor to remediate his dyslexia. It's not an option for me to teach him this at home. So I want it spelled out that I'm still legally homeschooling by outsourcing this.

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