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5LittleMonkeys

Could you help me work out a plan for using Spielvogel's Western Civilization (5th edition)?

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I really want to use this for dd15 starting next year (10th) and space it out over two years. Here are the things I need help figuring out:

  • How would I label these two years on a transcript? Would 1/2 the book be worth 1 credit or should the whole book only be counted as 1 credit?
  • I want to use Excellence in Literature for English but am not sure if it would be best to use the British Lit and World Lit as written or should I switch the selections up and tie them chronologically to the Spielvogel's.
  • Since the Spielvogel's text has no end of chapter questions like a typical high school text would have would it be sufficient to use the focus questions at the beginning of each chapter as written response questions?
  • What else would I add to this to make it credit worthy...documentaries, some map work...?

She has already read the first chapter to make sure that she would like it; she said she did and was looking forward to working through it. Of coarse she would prefer just to read through it at her own pace without all the added elements. :p

 

Any recommendations or suggestions would be great! Thanks. :)

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Okay, I just found this site. It is for the 7th edition but so far looks as if it lines up with my 5th edition.

 

Edited: found the 5th edition link too!

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They make an (excellent!) workbook to go with Spielvogel that even includes essay prompts that I use in conjunction with the text. I made a course description that does half a book of Spielvogel per year (about 7-8) chapters because it takes my children about a month per chapter. Then I map literature to each chapter and use Invitation to the Classics, WTM, WEM, and Jeff Baldwin guides (www.thegreatbooks.com) for discussion. We use the 6th edition of Spielvogel, the one that covers the four-year history cycle in two books, using half a book per year.

 

If you want to see a course description, you can PM me.

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We used Volume 1 (to 1715) of a 2-volume set of the 5th edition of Western Civilization. My ds did Ch. 1-6 as a spine for a semester-long course in 9th grade which we just called Ancient History. We often used the Focus questions for written response questions, and that seemed to work well. I supplemented with other reading such as historical fiction (The Cat of Bubastes), a book about pharoahs, a book (Sonlight book actually) on Archimedes, etc, and I also had ds study some non-western history using the Dorling Kindersley History of the World. I think he did some map work also. The only other thing I had him do was write a 4-page paper on a topic of his choice (he chose Archimedes.) I gave 1/2 credit for the semester.

 

The following year ds read a fair amount of the rest of Volume 1--though not all by any means, but he also did Omnibus II (not all the books--just a selected subset, which was still plenty of work) so that was our main source of discussions and written assignments and we didn't use the Focus Questions at all. This amounted to a full-year, 1-credit course we called Medieval History.

 

Anyway, extrapolating from my experience, I think half of Western Civ supplemented with a few extra books (unless the reading demands in Excellence in Lit make it impractical or cover what you'd want to add anyway), the focus questions, some map work and a couple of papers would constitute 1 credit (1 full year's work.) Adding documentaries when you can is a good idea too. My ds was a late bloomer in writing, so one paper for a semester in 9th grade was sufficient challenge for him; you would have to gauge the number & length of papers based on your dd's readiness and ability, and also balance it against the writing demands in Exc in Lit.

 

As far as labelling for the transcript goes, for each year you can create a course title that basically reflects what time periods you covered (something like Ancient through Renaissance History for the first year and Early Modern to 20th Century History for the second.) Or you could call the first year something like World History I, and the following year World History II. You could even put the time-span in years in your title, e.g. (3000 BC to 1715 AD). Those are just a few ideas.

 

Hope this helps!

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Yes, it is fine to do it as a two year course, one credit each year, listed by chronological period.

 

One supplement you might want to consider are the free Annenberg lectures - 52 half an hour lectures. http://www.learner.org/resources/series58.html Not too much time investment and might be good notetaking practice.

 

While the majority of the time I don't like workbooks, we found the Spielvogel workbook a worthwhile purchase. You don't have to do everything in there, but it can be a time saver to have it.

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http://www.amazon.com/Study-Spielvogels-Western-Civilization-Volume/dp/0495030902/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_y "Prepared by James T. Baker of Western Kentucky University, the Study Guide includes chapter outlines and summaries, a glossary of key terms for each chapter, analysis of primary source documents, and questions that include matching, multiple choice, fill-in-the blank, chronology, critical thought, and map exercise questions."

 

It looks like they call it a study guide. I'm sure I didn't pay more than $10 for it so we must have been using an older edition or a used book.

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We used this when we did Omnibus. I thought the 5th edition was plenty (and cheaper...) recent.

I will say that I enjoyed doing chronological literature alongside it. If your college of choice requires World LIt and Eng Lit as courses, you can always reorganize your booklist (I included a booklist with the transcript b/c we were doing mostly Great Books) accordingly.

 

Also, I did not like it for 20th cent history as it seemed lighter, but LOVED it for up thru Early Mods.

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Yes, it is fine to do it as a two year course, one credit each year, listed by chronological period.

 

One supplement you might want to consider are the free Annenberg lectures - 52 half an hour lectures. http://www.learner.org/resources/series58.html Not too much time investment and might be good notetaking practice.

 

While the majority of the time I don't like workbooks, we found the Spielvogel workbook a worthwhile purchase. You don't have to do everything in there, but it can be a time saver to have it.

 

 

Barbara, That link is broken, but when I go to the homepage there is a list of lecture titles. Is the one you're talking about called The Western Tradition?

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Thanks to all who replied! I'm really looking forward to this...I'm hoping to work through at least some of it with her. I'm pleased that this is going to be more fleshed out and "meatier" than I thought I'd be able to make it. The workbook and lectures are a great addition for her...both elements she likes.:)

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Hi Aime,

Sorry the link didn't work right. Yes, the Western Tradition. There is an index with a list of the lecture titles. The lecturer isn't everyone's cup of tea, but we enjoy his lecture style (and he's fun to impersonate too). I'm sure the Teaching Company would also have great options, but I tossed out the Western Tradition idea because it is free and the lectures are short so it may be enough to add a little bit of interest without adding too much work.

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Hi Aime,

Sorry the link didn't work right. Yes, the Western Tradition. There is an index with a list of the lecture titles. The lecturer isn't everyone's cup of tea, but we enjoy his lecture style (and he's fun to impersonate too). I'm sure the Teaching Company would also have great options, but I tossed out the Western Tradition idea because it is free and the lectures are short so it may be enough to add a little bit of interest without adding too much work.

 

Thank you! Free is my favorite kind of lecture. :)

 

I have drooled over many of the TC lectures and actually have one in mind (can't remember the title offhand) to purchase if there are funds left over after I get all the other dc's programs purchased.

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I used the questions at the front of the book as a short essay exam for each chapter. Here are my lesson plans if they help you any--

 

http://shadesofwhite.typepad.com/shades_of_white/2007/07/world-history-1.html

 

I had the workbook that went with my text, but it was fill in the blank type of stuff, and I really wanted my kids to do short essay exams for history. It is still somewhere on my shelf, most unused. I do think it helped them a lot when they went to college and had to write those short essays out in class with a limited amount of time to finish it.

 

With my last child, we did a few chapters of Spielvogel his 8th grade year. We took one question at a time and work together to make a good answer. I'd write and answer and then he would write an answer. We'd compare them and discuss them and he'd try again...slowly, all year long, we worked through the process of writing a short essay that made sense. By the time 9th grade came, this (mildly) dyslexic child was writing decent essays....and he went on to test out of his freshman English class in college, FWIW.

 

Anyway, if my lesson plans help at all, you can use them.

 

:-)

 

Jean

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Thank you for the plans Jean. :)

 

I liked reading that you worked with your son on the essay answers this way. I do a lot of this type of hand holding with my second oldest when it comes to giving written responses to questions. Sometimes I wonder if it will pay off...I'm glad to hear that it did for you and your ds.

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I'm late in the game here, but hope that some of you are still lurking. I'm looking at Notgrass, BJU or Speilvogel for a 10th grade world history course. Planning high school courses is a completely new thing for me. I'm wondering if Spielvogel is too much to cover in a year. Do you have a specific version of Spielvogel that you would recommend? I'd also like to tie in literature without totally overwhelming my dd. She is a very capable student who loves to read, but has only homeschooled one year using an online charter school. This next year will definitely be a learning curve for both of us. Which would you choose and why? Any suggestions would be helpful. Thank you!

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I'm planning 10th grade too.

I just got the text and workbook in over the weekend.

6th edition. Both were less than $10 used on Amazon.

I'm planning on covering one chapter per month and lining up one literature selection per month.

I don't have the plan made yet.

I'm glad others are doing the same book. I'll need your support. :)

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Okay, I just found this site. It is for the 7th edition but so far looks as if it lines up with my 5th edition.

 

Edited: found the 5th edition link too!

 

 

 

How did you find the link? It looks like I have to pay to access the site.

Is there a link for the 6th edition?

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How did you find the link? It looks like I have to pay to access the site.

Is there a link for the 6th edition?

 

 

Here's a link to all the 6th edition books they support. Click your book title, click the tab for "free materials" and then the button "access now". No login or signup is required.

 

We're using WC: A Brief History, 2nd edition at a pace of 1 chapter per week this year. The kids read the chapter, take outline-style notes, then take the chapter quiz from the online site.

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Here's a link to all the 6th edition books they support. Click your book title, click the tab for "free materials" and then the button "access now". No login or signup is required.

 

We're using WC: A Brief History, 2nd edition at a pace of 1 chapter per week this year. The kids read the chapter, take outline-style notes, then take the chapter quiz from the online site.

 

I do not see anything that says "free materials".

 

 

never mind.

i found it.

thanks!

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Just posting so I can find later

 

You can always choose the "follow topic" button at the top right of the first page (you can then select to follow anon or not) and then access the content by hovering over your name at top right and choosing "content I follow".

 

Then you will get a notification when new content is added to the page-you need to adjust your settings to decide if you want that sent as a email or just here on the board.

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Just curious if anyone who is using, or who has used, Spielvogel and coordinated literature to go with it, would like to share some of the lit they chose?

 

I just ordered from Amazon and am planning on doing some literature research once I have the history text in hand.

 

Thanks so much.

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Previous threads that might be helpful

 

Which Spielvogel text?

 

How Textbookish is Spielvogel

 

What is the difference between Spielvogels (post 19 has additional links on other history threads)

 

Spielvogel question: which one to use

 

Lori D, RE: World History using Spielvogel

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Thought I'd update for anyone coming across this looking for info.

 

  • Here is the workbook she's using.
  • Here is the lecture series mentioned up thread. This has been her favorite part of this study so far. 
  • Here is a link to a lecture series that we used parts of for The Epic of Gilgamesh and The Odyssey.
  • We've been using Shmoop for most of the background info, discussion and essay questions for her literature.
  • This is the list of literature for the year.

Epic of Gilgamesh

The Odyssey

Oedipus Rex

Aeneid

Beowulf

Canterbury Tales

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Divine Comedy:Inferno

King Lear

Much Ado About Nothing

Midsummer's Night Dream

 

 

 

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