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Are there any nonconsumable handwriting programs?


mo2
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There are downloadable programs or things free online that you can print. Is that any better? That's what I do because I hate buying workbooks and then throwing them away at the end, only to buy them again for the next kid. For some reason a download seems better to me, but maybe I'm weird. :)

 

My favourites are the Starfall ABC sheets and Teach Me Joy handwriting programs.

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There are downloadable programs or things free online that you can print. Is that any better? That's what I do because I hate buying workbooks and then throwing them away at the end, only to buy them again for the next kid. For some reason a download seems better to me, but maybe I'm weird. :)

 

My favourites are the Starfall ABC sheets and Teach Me Joy handwriting programs.

 

 

 

You just reminded me that I own Teach Me Joy Cursive... :o

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My dd flew through her handwriting book in about 2 months. That's when I purchased StartWrite. Yes, you have to make the worksheets, but I don't feel like I'm blowing my money on workbooks, though. They have a bunch of fonts available in the program. I use the manuscript for dd and cursive for my ds.

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Remember that children were learning good penmanship long before there was such a thing as consumable. :-) Even I, who went to school in the 50s, never had a workbook for penmanship.

 

You don't even need to print/photocopy/reproduce "worksheets." Blank, lined paper works just as well. You give the child a model, with verbal and visual instructions on how to form the letters and strokes, and he writes on the paper.

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Some people use a black/white board as well. I made papers for my oldest using Startwrite, but I am lazy now and have a composition book and am putting poems and whatnot in them for my daughter to copy. My handwriting is not perfect so it's a bit of a drag for me to try to be tidy (!) but oh well. I had a Getty-Dubai italics workbook that he hadn't used, so she used that and has just used a composition book for the rest. It helps not have papers flying everywhere.

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DD does her copywork on a little dry erase board. I got it at Staples in the school supplies section. One side is all white, and the other side has handwriting lines (the kind with upper and lower solid lines, and a dashed line in the middle). I'm pretty sure it was only $1, too. We use it probably more than anything else in our house.

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I really like this cursive book by Linda Corson: http://www.amazon.co...63141164&sr=1-1

 

Very thorough and step by step--easy to follow!

 

 

This looks nice. I just ordered it!

 

What about using dry erase books? We've got one here and DD7 loves it! Definitely invest in a good set of dry erase markers if you go this route though. I like the "wipe off" brand. They clean up so much nicer than the others, I find.

 

 

Oh, yes, my dry erase boards get a lot of use!

 

Remember that children were learning good penmanship long before there was such a thing as consumable. :-) Even I, who went to school in the 50s, never had a workbook for penmanship.

 

You don't even need to print/photocopy/reproduce "worksheets." Blank, lined paper works just as well. You give the child a model, with verbal and visual instructions on how to form the letters and strokes, and he writes on the paper.

 

 

This is why I don't feel the need for workbooks. I just want a TM or instructor guide to help me teach proper letter formation, as my handwriting is not the best. :)

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Remember that children were learning good penmanship long before there was such a thing as consumable. :-) Even I, who went to school in the 50s, never had a workbook for penmanship.

 

You don't even need to print/photocopy/reproduce "worksheets." Blank, lined paper works just as well. You give the child a model, with verbal and visual instructions on how to form the letters and strokes, and he writes on the paper.

 

 

This. Paper and pencil are sufficient. If you know how to form the letters you can tell someone else how. :001_smile:

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This is why I don't feel the need for workbooks. I just want a TM or instructor guide to help me teach proper letter formation, as my handwriting is not the best. :)
This. Paper and pencil are sufficient. If you know how to form the letters you can tell someone else how. :001_smile:

 

We posted on top of each other. :p I'll add a WRTR vote. I have the 4th edition, which includes manuscript and cursive, but I hear the newer ones have more explicit instruction.

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I can't imagine practicing handwriting on a white board :confused:. It's so slippery. Even a blackboard is difficult.

 

I make sure students are using a good quality mechanical pencil and some paper with a little tooth to it. I do NOT have students write on slick copy paper.

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I can't imagine practicing handwriting on a white board :confused:. It's so slippery. Even a blackboard is difficult.

 

I make sure students are using a good quality mechanical pencil and some paper with a little tooth to it. I do NOT have students write on slick copy paper.

 

I think the "slip" factor is what my kids like. They all seem to want to press down very hard when they first start writing, so mechanical pencils would die a quick death here. With the dry erase I think it's easier for them and their hands don't seem to get tired as quickly. I've never found the surface to be a problem.

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We are just started Phonics road to reading and writing. Her handwriting instruction seems really good. I know a lot of other people have used this program for awhile and can probably give more info on it, but as a brand new user, I like it, and I understand what I am supposed to be doing.

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I have a D'Nealian wall chart and a ream of 1st grade paper (portrait orientation like regular notebook paper). I did have to spend some time retraining myself. I first traced the chart's letters onto K paper and put clear contact paper over it. It works great with dry erase markers. On the 1st grade paper we started out with a few letters at a time, tracing then free-handing. Once the whole alphabet was fairly consistent, we moved onto copywork selections I had previously selected (I used Bible verses). I wrote out the selection skipping lines in between. As she got better at that, I just wrote the selection small across the top and let her refer to the wall chart as needed. I did trade time for money, but time I have. Money, not so much! fwiw. It's possible to do most things without buying programs.

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