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What do you do for the summer?


sweetpea3829
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Originally, I had thought we'd school year round. But even I'm pining for long, lazy summer days of relaxation and lounging.

 

We will definitely be doing science over the summer (Apologia Botany).

 

And probably history.

 

For math and language arts, I don't intend to introduce anything new, just review and practice. This is especially important for DD who has LDs, and can't go more than a week without forgetting everything she's been taught.

 

So what do you guys use for "maintenance" for language arts (grammar) and math?

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What do you use during the year? I might go with Math Mammoth Blue because they are topical and not by grade. If Math facts aren't automatic, I would make that a priority. 10 minutes of drill a day can make a great deal of difference later...

 

I might get a simple workbook on grammar, If my child were in a 4th, I might get a 2nd, 3rd and 4th grade workbook on grammar and have them work through all 3. Just to keep everything tight. Especially if you want to keep your work days short, I would aim for about 45minutes of work a day for grammar and math. Then do your science on whatever schedule pleases you...

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DS6 is finishing Singapore 1. DD7 is not really in a math curriculum. No one curriculum meets her needs so I pull from this and that. I just picked up MUS Alpha and maybe I'll work through that with her.

 

I've been doing Spectrum workbooks for review of concepts learned in FLL1. I picked up LLATL for next year. I bought red, but I think we're going to blow right through it.

 

What other language arts workbooks are there besides Spectrum?

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DS6 is finishing Singapore 1. DD7 is not really in a math curriculum. No one curriculum meets her needs so I pull from this and that. I just picked up MUS Alpha and maybe I'll work through that with her.

 

I've been doing Spectrum workbooks for review of concepts learned in FLL1. I picked up LLATL for next year. I bought red, but I think we're going to blow right through it.

 

What other language arts workbooks are there besides Spectrum?

 

Then MathMammoth Topical books might be great for your DD7, and Singapore comes with all its extra supplements. I would look into a couple of those Complete Book of... for the kiddos. They are thicker than the Spectrum books and have their own use. Like I said, I would get a range of Grades, 1-4. or whatever is appropriate for your kids.

 

I would give my DD a few placement tests to try and identify where she is at with skills, and use those results to guide me for picking workbooks for her. OR there are an unlimited supply of math worksheets online.

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MUS has been a major blessing to my LD daughter - I hope that you have the same results. Because of B's issues, that is why we will keep going. We have always taken random breaks in the year, and it just is our natural schedule. The public school kid has really mucked us up flow wise - and my ex has discovered working around school holidays and his schedule isn't so fun.

 

I'm actually making changes in our curriculum right now, so we will start the new stuff as it arrives in the next couple of weeks.

 

Have you looked at the evan-moor stuff? There are some nice daily review types of stuff, and with the teacher filebox membership for $70 you have access to all levels for a year. it is nice to vary based on what we need. DD has some 4-5th grade stuff, and some 1st.

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We're mostly finished what I'd set out to do this year which is perfect with a baby coming. But when we're ready, I've got a ton of resources for sight words and we'll probably read LOF Butterflies and maybe work through volume 2 of the level 1 AAR readers. The only other thing I can see doing is Building Thinking Skills, but only if it works.

 

I find my kids do better with a bit of structure. So if 'doing school' turns out to be easier than 'not doing school', we're doing it :-)

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We do math at least 2-3 times a week. I can't remember the last time we finished our curriculum by the end of the school year, so generally we just carry on with that. Other than that, not much. The kids write things, but nothing formal. We go to the library and generally carry on in a very unschooly manner.

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We take at least six weeks off from formal schooling in the summer, plus usually another six weeks of "light" school work. Summer is the time when Minnesotans come out of their winter hibernation and can actually spend consistent time outdoors. ;-)

 

We haven't done a lot of formal grammar yet so no plans on review for that, but for math I will have the kids do math apps on the iPad and play RightStart math games. I think I will have DD do worksheet fact drills a couple times per week. For spelling the kids will play the Logic of English phonogram app (unless DD "masters" all the phonograms in the app by the time summer hits), and maybe play some review games in spelling city.

 

We'll also be doing informal science lessons and doing history reading correlated with studying Minnesota history...but those are going to seem more like "fun" and less like "school" (I hope anyway!).

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I usually assign a school project that has to be done in the summer. One year it was a nature journal, the next year it was designing and planting a garden from bare ground (flower or veggie) and maintaining it. DD chose a flower garden, and we signed her up for a 6 week floral workshop for kids in conjunction with the project. Last year was her most ambitious. With the help of her father, she designed and built her own full-sized, cedar log bed. Although she learned to "hate" the geometrical math involved in the design she developed (it was even more elaborate until dh advised her to simplify it), she now loves her big bed which she's been sleeping in since September!

 

This year I'm not sure what to do. We were toying with schooling year-round, but I'm also thinking about the summer projects I have to do. So, I'm leaning more towards concentrating on a reading list; doing some math every other day to keep fresh and continue with her hunting and basic survival skills. She started rabbit hunting with dh this winter and just recently got her first rabbit. She's been bitten by the hunting bug and loves it. Along with that comes hunter safety and learning about what to do if you become lost in the woods and what to carry with you at all times.

 

I really think we'll go with that. She'll still be learning, but also doing things she loves. Thanks guys! You just helped me solidify our schooling plans for the summer!

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We just keep going. We take random breaks througout the year, but take more during the summer. I also have the kids play outside in the morning and school in the afternoon instead of in the morning like in fall/winter. Last year we started our new 1st program in July. It doesn't bother me/us to start new things in the summer. This year, we are hoping to finish 1st by the end of May, go camping in early June and then start 2nd mid-June or July 1. :)

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We keep the skill subjects (math, language arts, etc.) running through the summer.

 

The content subjects are the major change. We don't do history or a science curriculum during the summer. Instead, we do unit studies. I let my kids pick the topics. Last year, after much negotiating among siblings, we did the Olympics, birds, and a few other things. We also did Atelier art, which we had never gotten around to during the school year.

 

This summer, we are going to do a high-level geography overview, as well as whatever they want to do.

 

I am also toying with the idea of having each kid lead one week-long unit on the subject of their choice. I would help, obviously, but they would be doing some of the prep & presenting.

 

I am also thinking of working hard on one particular life skill. I'm not sure exactly what yet, but probably either cooking or money management. Those are the things I just don't get to during the regular school year because we do lots of co-ops & activities.

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We take off both June and July. We play outside, make lots of trips to the library to load up on books, visit museums, head to the pool, spend some time at the beach, etc. My kids usually come up with a number of projects on their own, but I don't plan or direct anything. In fact, I withdraw them from all of their activities (dance, gymnastics, sports, music lessons) for the summer. We really enjoy the time off, and I think my children benefit from having a block of time where they can learn in a more relaxed, organic sort of way. When we start to work in August, I always find that they have made leaps forward academically.

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We school year round. My family needs a great deal of consistency and structure to maintain daily life functioning. I'm sure it sounds cruel and strange, but it is what works for us. The kids have improved so much this way (not just academically).

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Other than relaxing and enjoying the outdoors I like for the kids to do math review and daily reading. My dh is going to start Apologia Botany with them in a few weeks and will continue into the summer. Also this summer my ds will be working on his handwriting and spelling a bit.

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School. It is too hot here to enjoy summer. We get a little lazy in the spring :)

 

 

Same here. We take off about 3-4 weeks in June to do absolutely nothing school related, then it gets so hot that the kids don't want to play outside and I don't blame them, so we start school back up. They get more break/play time in the fall when it gets really nice and cool. :)

 

I can't imagine taking the whole summer off with the heat here. My kids would be pestering me for too much screen time, and it would just be bad all around. Do-nothing days are best when the temp is in the 60s or 70s! Then I can chuck them outside all day.

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We take July and August off. The kids have swimming lessons, ball, park days, and other activities. The kids also have a reading program through the library, so they read daily. We do a bit of review on math if the kids start complaining about being bored. One or two lessons usually cures this problem. LOL

 

This summer I would really like to do more nature study stuff...but what I intend to do and what actually happens are two very different things. LOL

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We take off from Memorial Day through 4th of July week. During that time, we do some math review a few times per week, and we continue our Bible studies. Otherwise, that is their time to indulge themselves in whatever they enjoy - laziness, pick-up games of basketball with neighborhood friends, practicing for their baseball tournaments in mid-June, working on their secret fort located somewhere in the woods, fishing and swimming in the creek behind our house, playing video games, etc.

We start a 1/2 time schedule from the week following the 4th of July through the day the PS kids return to school. We only work on "skills" subjects - math, reading, writing, English + Bible - so they have time to continue enjoying their interests. On the day the PS kids return to school, we pick up our full schedule.

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This is our first year hsing, but here is my plan for the summer: math, grammar, writing, piano, logic, geography, and spelling will continue as normal. Literature, history, and science we will be unschooling (meaning I'll leave books and movies lying around that I know the kids would be interested in, but nothing will be required of them).

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This is the first summer that I'm not sure how things are going to work. I'm adding a day of work during the week, so I'm going to need to adjust school around that, as well as housekeeping and exercise. I'm working on scheduling it all right now. The only thing for sure that we are going to be doing will be Memoria Press Insect Study--mostly because summer here is so buggy that finding specimens is only too easy.

I will probably just keep plugging away with whatever comes next, but the bugs sounded like a good idea for the summer.

Normally we would just keep going. It's far too hot here to take off more than a week or so. Some days it is even too hot to go swimming.

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My girls do a summer neighborhood swim team that runs June-July. During this time, we work our day around those practices and meets. Practice for the older kids is 6-8a and 12-1p for the youngers. My 8 year old will do school from 9-11a each day (continue with math and whatever else I feel like we need to continue or begin during the summer). Since my older girls are no longer homeschooling, I'm not sure what I'll have them do academically this summer; I'm considering an online SAT prep class for the rising 10th grader and a writing course for the rising 8th grader.

 

We have a "No feet on the floor from 2-4" rule in the afternoons that used to mean naps for some of us, but will likely translate into quiet reading/playing time for all this year. Those are my favorite hours of the day, all year long. We're all so quietly productive and well-rested for the long summer evenings.

 

August is summer camp (for the middle two girls), Driver's Ed for the big girl and vacation time for all of us. We'll do no school work for the month, before everyone returns Monday following Labor Day.

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We will do science with the whole family together. Then there will be 1 hour of reading a day for the bigger kiddos and some for the younger ones. We will play around with LOF and math facts this summer and one short writing prompt/assignment to keep them up. We didn't do any writing last summer and we saw serious regression. I am hoping that except for the reading the rest of it can be done in an hour. Then they are free to play. We have pretty icky winters here so we take all the warm weather we can manage

Christina

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I usually assign a school project that has to be done in the summer. One year it was a nature journal, the next year it was designing and planting a garden from bare ground (flower or veggie) and maintaining it. DD chose a flower garden, and we signed her up for a 6 week floral workshop for kids in conjunction with the project. Last year was her most ambitious. With the help of her father, she designed and built her own full-sized, cedar log bed. Although she learned to "hate" the geometrical math involved in the design she developed (it was even more elaborate until dh advised her to simplify it), she now loves her big bed which she's been sleeping in since September!

 

This year I'm not sure what to do. We were toying with schooling year-round, but I'm also thinking about the summer projects I have to do. So, I'm leaning more towards concentrating on a reading list; doing some math every other day to keep fresh and continue with her hunting and basic survival skills. She started rabbit hunting with dh this winter and just recently got her first rabbit. She's been bitten by the hunting bug and loves it. Along with that comes hunter safety and learning about what to do if you become lost in the woods and what to carry with you at all times.

 

I really think we'll go with that. She'll still be learning, but also doing things she loves. Thanks guys! You just helped me solidify our schooling plans for the summer!

 

I like the idea of a long term summer project! I'm going t be thinking about this! Thanks!

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So what do you guys use for "maintenance" for language arts (grammar) and math?

 

For Language Arts Grammar, I have used Grammar Workshop free worksheets for the summer.

 

http://www.sadlier-oxford.com/grammar/games.cfm?sp=family&level=Green

 

For math, i have used public schools math summer packets as revision. These are hosted free at many schools' webpages.

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We unschooled LOL. Which means I do nothing and the kids do whatever they want. My DH is a school principal so he is on holidays too. We hang out, go on field trips, sleep in, clean the house. We just finished our summer holidays at the end of Jan and I didn't notice my kids had lost any skills from lack of school work. We still do read alouds but other then that we just play and relax.

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For years, I schooled in the summer 2-3 days a week except for vacations (about 2 weeks) and we took a week off here and there throughout the year for Christmas or a mental break if needed. The past couple summers...between music camps, travel for music gigs, and extra work hours for me to make up for the times we are away...we don't get very much school done in the summer.

 

The boys have summer reading for school and will do SAT and ACT practice/preparation this summer. Dd and I will read a lot which we are able to do on the road, do math now and then to keep her from forgetting too much with a long break, and she writes and crafts all the time but other than that, it will be long, lazy days for kids.

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we school year round and after a few set backs this year and moving cross country we have some gaps to fill. I do school in the afternoons in summer so they can get some outside time before its too hot out. I try to do more fun things and less heavy on book work. My main goals are penmanship with my preK'er, getting my 7 year old reading better, and lots of math with my 11 year old. My 14 year old is looking into a summer work program so I will adjust to fit her schedule.

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We school full time Aug. - end of May. The first week of June includes our VBS in the evening and day camps during the day. (yes camps. Each has chosen a different one this year, yikes!) So they get that week off. For the rest of June we will do:

 

L.A: Summer reading program at the library. They will read for prizes, doing any games or recording required for the summer w/that. That is mostly it. If we take any trips they are required to do a travel journal. They glue in postcards and pamphlets and write about what we do. dd8, whose biggest problem in school that could suffer the worst setback is spelling. We will work in a fun charactery spelling workbook over the summer from dollar tree (think disney princesses or something like that..)

 

 

Math: One dd never finishes her math in the Aug-May time. She will be required to do math on the afternoons that we don't have plans in June, possible into July, depending on where she is and what I want her to finish before starting the new book in Aug. This is typical for her. She would rather take it slowly during the year and work through the summer. DD8 will probably just do math games online for 15 a min.

 

Science/history. We will finish reading SOTW, but will do no bookwork with the last chapters. We may do art projects that we never get to during the school year instead. For science, we will observe nature that we have studied all year: birds, everywhere we go.

 

Besides that bit of work, which really isn't much, we will do amusement parks, zoo, and museums and playdates. We will visit family in July and won't be working that month at all. It is our big holiday month of the year!

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We end up taking off the summer, even though I like the idea of year-round school. The boys do swimming and diving which means we are at the pool all day every day. It’s a nice way to spend the summer though. And my oldest has started to do a couple of camps in August.

 

I have them do a tiny bit of Math, usually something they think is fun. We might play Math games. There are some games that are obviously Math games (Equate, 7ATE9, all the Right Start Games). A great book for math games to review facts is Peggy Kaye’s Games for Math. Or we’ll play “math war†which is like regular card game war but you have to add or subtract two cards together. Or there are games they don’t think of as Math: Monopoly, Blokus, Mastermind, Set.

 

For Language Arts all we do is read. The summers where they were still learning to read I just had us work a tiny bit on phonics every day, even at the pool. Once they can read well we sign up for several library reading programs and I encourage them to read a lot.

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We use a Mon-Fri., six week on, one week off for the school "year", and then for summer work we do Mon-Thurs and only about 2 hrs/day (math and reading mainly) for three weeks with a week off. It still gives us more days than are required but I don't feel so bad when we have unproductive days during the school "year".

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We do school lite over the summer and take weeks off for camps, etc. When they don't have camp, this is what we'll do:

 

M-Th

Continuing with TT7

EM Daily Language Practice

Typing

 

Alternating Days

Sequential Spelling

Finish Aha! Science

 

Fridays

Analogies and Mindbenders

Typing Games

 

 

DD in PS

Typing

Spanish

Spectrum Math workbook for review

 

 

I don't expect but about an hour per day and less on Fridays over the summer. But, it's just enough to keep them thinking.

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Thanks for all of the wonderful ideas, everyone! I'm still kicking around different things. I'm prepping my last round of lesson plans which will hopefully take me to the end of this "school year" and I think over the course of May, we'll slowly peter out until we're just doing review of math and language arts concepts. Except, of course, history and science.

 

Maybe we'll see about unschooling over the summer...see how that works out. For DD, I have always seen her as needing a very structured scheduled day. We took a week off last week and started back up yesterday and I swear, it's like I never taught her a single thing. She just regresses so much. But if we do frequent review, I think she'll be ok. Just not sure how that would work if we were to ditch "school at home" and embrace unschooling.

 

Somebody asked if my oldest were 6. My oldest is 7 and my oldest boy is 6. But the boy works at a rising 1st grade level and would probably be halfway through 2nd grade if I wasn't holding him back a bit. Instead of letting him progress too quickly, I chose to enrich what he was doing at a grade level one year above where he should be. I didn't want him to get too far ahead of his age appropriate grade level just in case I ever have to enroll him in a public school.

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