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I need some ideas to help my son learn his multiplication facts


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There are skip-counting paper toys available for you to print out for him. I love these: http://www.thetoymaker.com/Otter/Ottercarousel/1Browniemath/Brownieforest.html

 

My kids have memorized their tables up to 15x15 by learning a bunch of annoying but effective songs. We do them through CC but I'm sure there are other smart people who have written blog posts about what songs they use.

 

We write out the numbers in a row and the boys like to run a hot wheel along as they skip-count. You could do something like that but also say (x times 3 is Y) or whatever.

 

Google reveals lots of printable games for times tables practice.

 

We've put a marble in an empty egg carton with numbers written in each spot and whichever number it lands on has to be multiplied by the number you're practicing.

 

Hope that helps.

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When my boys were younger I found that memorizing *anything* was easier when they were involved in a physical activity. I read some books on learning theory that explained why it was so effective...and we found it an excellent way to learn multiplication tables, prepositions, poetry, etc. The trampoline was a favorite place but it necessitated me being there to move things along.

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simple game we enjoyed - buy 2 10-sided dice (we found them in a comic book shop). Each person takes a turn rolling the 2 dice and stating the problem "2 time 7 equals 14". if they get it wrong, just help them, its not a quiz. Whoever gets the highest 'score' that round wins a tally mark. totally simple, my boys loved it, just keeps reviewing the facts . ..

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I would never force a child to do this method, but my son wanted to do it and it seemed to work. He just started writing them each day.

1x1=1

1x2=2

1x3=3, etc.

 

He decided to write the tables for 1 through 6 one day and 7 through 12 another day. Every time he wrote them, it got faster and easier. After a couple of times, he dropped off the easier ones and just focused on the bigger ones. It really didn't take long.

Simple but effective if your kid likes to write. :-)

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I think flash cards are fun. That's how I learned...back in the day. :) A friend made math sheets on an excel spreadsheet that I thought was pretty cool. If your familiar with skip counting, you just create a chart and have them fill in the blanks for each number. She made them color coded which was a nice visual. You can also time them for fun.

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Equipment: 2 pieces of paper, a stack of pennies

 

Write 1 - 12 on each piece of paper.

 

Take turns rolling a 12-sided die (found in comic book stores or online). You may also use 2 6-sided dice and omit 1 in your list.

 

Example:

We are learning 3s.

 

I roll an 11, so I [count up or announce] that 3x11 = 33. I put a penny on my 11.

 

dd rolls a 9, so she [counts up or announces] that 3x9 = 27. She puts a penny on her 9.

 

I roll a 4. so I [count up or announce] that 3x4 = 12. I put a penny on my 4.

 

Whoever covers their numbers first wins.

 

----------------------------

 

For nines:

Open up your ten fingers and look at the palms of your hands.

 

Let's do 3x9.

 

With your palms open, count to your third finger (middle finger on left hand). Put that third finger down, but keep the remaining 9 fingers up.

 

Notice that there are 2 fingers to the left of the down finger, and 7 fingers to the right of the down finger.

 

So: 2 and 7.

3 x 9 = 27.

 

:hurray:

 

Let's do another. Open your palms again so all 10 fingers are up.

 

7 x 9

 

Put down your 7th finger (ring finger on right hand).

 

Notice that you have 6 fingers to the left of the down finger and 3 fingers to the right of the down finger.

 

So, 6 and 3.

7x9=63

 

****This only works for 9s!!!!*****

 

------------------------------------------------

I have made several columns on a sheet of paper for dd to write the 3s, 4s, and 6s skipcounted again and again and again. She will do 1-2 columns each day. It is similar to Math-U-See's system. I've used it with other children.

 

I'm not sure how much this is working for my own dd. She may just need to get a little older.

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Times Tales! After the lengthy, painful process of learning addition and subtraction, I used Times Tales with dd for multiplication. So much easier! Worth every penny.

 

 

:iagree: We just started Times Tales and love it!!!

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I would never force a child to do this method, but my son wanted to do it and it seemed to work. He just started writing them each day.

1x1=1

1x2=2

1x3=3, etc.

 

He decided to write the tables for 1 through 6 one day and 7 through 12 another day. Every time he wrote them, it got faster and easier. After a couple of times, he dropped off the easier ones and just focused on the bigger ones. It really didn't take long.

Simple but effective if your kid likes to write. :-)

 

I know (in real life, lol) a veteran homeschool mom of 5 graduated kids who recommends this method. She said that she tried everything, but this was the one that REALLY worked. You just have to make sure they aren't writing them in columns to get through faster. ;)

 

My MIL, another veteran homeschooler of 3 graduates, teaches my kids one day a week while I work. I had been struggling to get my daughter to memorize the facts. She went over one day with a list of facts to work on and came home KNOWING ALL OF THEM. It was like a miracle. I asked her what Grammy did with her that she learned them so well and she said, "I don't want to tell you, cause then you'll make me do it!" Eventually (like weeks later) I coaxed it out of her, with the promise that I wouldn't do it much as long as she kept learning with Grammy. I found that Grammy just works on them orally, asking her random facts (of those she's working on) in fairly rapid succession, over and over. Such a small thing, and so effective!

 

I think a lot of it has to do with a child's learning style (auditory/visual/kinesthetic). Good luck finding that magical way that works for your son! :D

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This: http://www.multiplication.com/products/books/memorize-minutes-times-tables

 

You tell a story with the characters, you color a picture,

 

You play games (we loved hangman)

They have flash cards you can use.

He has a method where you put the WHOLE times table on the board (so it looks daunting)

Then erase 1/2 (because 2x3 is the same as 3x2)

Then erase the 1 (cause you know them)

And whoa--- there isn't that much to do.

 

The stories are fun and the coloring helps to cement them in your memory,

The stories can be used for division (since you know the answer and one character, you can find the other character)

 

One example:

4x4=16

 

There was a queen that went through a revolving door and was having so much fun she kept doing it over and over until she got sick

So: door x door= sick queen

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