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Getting "kicked out" of a virtual school.


Guest ccdr
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We have been in a k12 virtual school for 3 years. This year we will "opt out" of state tests. This will most likely result in us being removed from the school. I am curious if anyone had experience with being kicked out of a k12 virtual school. Mostly, I am wondering how quickly they shut you out of the online school. I don' t mind getting removed from the school before next year, but want to finish this school year.

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We have been in a k12 virtual school for 3 years. This year we will "opt out" of state tests. This will most likely result in us being removed from the school. I am curious if anyone had experience with being kicked out of a k12 virtual school. Mostly, I am wondering how quickly they shut you out of the online school. I don' t mind getting removed from the school before next year, but want to finish this school year.

 

Curious, why are you opting out? I'm sure they will let you finish the year unless you signed an agreement that says otherwise.

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Our state requires K12 virtual school students to complete mandatory state assessments. In our state, (if we live in the same state, it's where the principal sends out a weekly letter with trivia questions) ) it's pretty immediate. The computer, books, and all materials have to be returned within a week or they bill you directly.

 

If you haven't signed up for a test date yet, your K12 teacher will start calling and requiring you to sign up for one. You could always not show and try to finish out in the meantime.

 

We did the assessments, but chose not to re-enroll eldest the next year as one year of test prep overkill was more than enough for us. I thought we were signing up to take tests---one day out of the year where we had to show up, not a big deal, right?...We didn't realize the K12 process involved two months of twice weekly hour-long mandatory test prep sessions, daily computer drilltime, and completing a test prep booklet and flashcards work. Uh, no thanks.

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Ugh, the testing prep was a big reason we didn't stick with K12 as well. I didn't mind having to go and take the test but I don't want to have to spend a certain amount of time each week on the Study Island website to prove that we're preparing for it. When we stopped it was about 2 weeks later that we could no longer access the OLS.

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I thought legally parents had the right to opt their children out of taking standardized tests? See here for information.

 

Now if too many parents exercise their legal right to opt-out, the school can lose its charter, which is why most virtual schools lean heavily on parents to participate in testing. I do have my kids take the stupid STAR test for that reason. But if I had a child for whom testing was more problematic than just being a nuisance waste of time, then I would absolutely exercise my right to opt-out (this may be an issue in the future with my autistic child).

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Wow, thanks for all these quick replies! Sounds like I can probably get done, then. I think we will focus more on online material to get as much done just in case.

Why opt out? My last 1st grader's reading test was not able to be scored because he left it blank because he was thirsty and the teacher wouldn't let him get water. She even told me she told him to "slobber up." This was after driving over an hour one way. 2 days of testing for him. 4 for his older brother. The tests themselves are wrong anyway, in my opinion. Especially the Iowa test for K-2. It is just awful!

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If a state has a separate legal category for homeschooled children distinct from privately and publicly schooled children, then the NCLB opt-out provision would not apply. NCLB only applies to students who are legally considered public school students (regardless of whether they are in a classroom-based public school, a virtual charter, or a district independent study program). States are free to set their own testing requirements for homeschoolers not enrolled in a public school.

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I suppose I could just do it. Whatta they gonna do? But I'm not that much of a rebel. *sigh*

 

While there are homeschoolers who are "underground" and don't comply with their state's regulations, I would not personally feel comfortable doing so. What if some busybody made a bogus CPS complaint, but it emerged during the investigation that my kids were not in compliance with the compulsory education law? Just not worth the risk IMHO...

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