Jump to content

Menu

Allergy testing frustration


Miss Peregrine
 Share

Recommended Posts

My daughter, 10, was tested today and the highest reactions were to pine and cedar. We live in a freakin' forest! What on earth are we supposed to do? :glare:

 

She was the only one, out of five, who was born here. I breastfed her for over 2 and a half years, as opposed to a year or less for the others and she is the one allergic to everything!

 

Thank you for letting me vent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know, when i did all my testing, both at the allergist and a mail-away sensitivity test, i realized that, yeah, the 'inhaled' allergies . . . who cares? i can tell when i'm having trouble breathing, why do i need ot know the name of what is blooming today? the only things you can control are pets and foods. fwiw, taking my allergy foods out of my diet helped damp down my inhaled allergy reactions. well, they interact. i cant eat garlic in high allergy season, or i have trouble breathing. but in the middle of the winter, i can eat garlic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know, when i did all my testing, both at the allergist and a mail-away sensitivity test, i realized that, yeah, the 'inhaled' allergies . . . who cares? i can tell when i'm having trouble breathing, why do i need ot know the name of what is blooming today? the only things you can control are pets and foods. fwiw, taking my allergy foods out of my diet helped damp down my inhaled allergy reactions. well, they interact. i cant eat garlic in high allergy season, or i have trouble breathing. but in the middle of the winter, i can eat garlic.

 

 

Interesting. She is allergic to dogs and had a slight reaction to cat. We have both.

 

I thought for sure that she would react to dairy. She didn't, but when I eliminated it for 2 weeks in January her red eyes went away and she did not complain of headaches. They came back when we added it back in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know, when i did all my testing, both at the allergist and a mail-away sensitivity test, i realized that, yeah, the 'inhaled' allergies . . . who cares? i can tell when i'm having trouble breathing, why do i need ot know the name of what is blooming today? the only things you can control are pets and foods. fwiw, taking my allergy foods out of my diet helped damp down my inhaled allergy reactions. well, they interact. i cant eat garlic in high allergy season, or i have trouble breathing. but in the middle of the winter, i can eat garlic.

 

 

This is interesting - thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Interesting. She is allergic to dogs and had a slight reaction to cat. We have both.

 

I thought for sure that she would react to dairy. She didn't, but when I eliminated it for 2 weeks in January her red eyes went away and she did not complain of headaches. They came back when we added it back in.

 

 

So, what happened next - did you leave the dairy in or take it back out? We are on the fence about doing trials for avoiding dairy and wheat for my asthma boy. He skin-tested negative more than three times for both of them, and we are contemplating the controversial IgG blood test (with a nutritionist) before deciding on a trial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, what happened next - did you leave the dairy in or take it back out? We are on the fence about doing trials for avoiding dairy and wheat for my asthma boy. He skin-tested negative more than three times for both of them, and we are contemplating the controversial IgG blood test (with a nutritionist) before deciding on a trial.

 

 

 

I was waiting for the testing today. DD said she is not eliminating it again because it didn't show up. She loves dairy. I want to try again just to see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought for sure that she would react to dairy. She didn't, but when I eliminated it for 2 weeks in January her red eyes went away and she did not complain of headaches. They came back when we added it back in.

 

 

I have read that dairy allergies don't always show up in allergy testing. Maybe it's lactose intolerance and not an allergy? Maybe that's why it doesn't show up?

 

We went through allergy testing with my younger dd. She was clearly an allergic person, and it seemed to be seasonal, but not a dang thing showed up as a seasonal allergy. I know for a fact that she's lactose intolerant, although I'm not sure that was tested. She reacted slightly to grass, wool, and cotton linters (sp?), none of which would explain her tiredness and why she got respiratory infections every year in the spring. :glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my teen son reacted negatively to both wheat allergy and celiac, but his stomach problems went away when we took him off of gluten, so he's off gluten. but me, i reacted to 90% of the foods the allergist tested me for. so i spent 3 years slowly testing all the foods to see what I actually reacted to and what was false positives . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I was waiting for the testing today. DD said she is not eliminating it again because it didn't show up. She loves dairy. I want to try again just to see.

 

I have a few questions about your dairy-free trial, if you don't mind: do you track asthma in any extra-special way during the trial, like with a daily check with the peak flow meter? do you eliminate butter in baked goods? How soon did you see improvement?

 

Thanks :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

So, what happened next - did you leave the dairy in or take it back out? We are on the fence about doing trials for avoiding dairy and wheat for my asthma boy. He skin-tested negative more than three times for both of them, and we are contemplating the controversial IgG blood test (with a nutritionist) before deciding on a trial.

 

Blood test is controversial? I didn't know that. We got our results yesterday and it's not looking good. Unless I put him in front of the air purifier for the rest of his life, I just don't know.

Ours also came back negative on dairy, so we decided not to proceed with elimination diet. I am revamping his room though to deal with his dust mite allergy and hoping the poor kid finally manages to inhale through his nose. So, I am commiserating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter, 10, was tested today and the highest reactions were to pine and cedar. We live in a freakin' forest! What on earth are we supposed to do? :glare:

 

She was the only one, out of five, who was born here. I breastfed her for over 2 and a half years, as opposed to a year or less for the others and she is the one allergic to everything!

 

Thank you for letting me vent.

 

We're new to this too. My daughter developed seasonal allergies at 13 and asthma by 15. She's allergic to 3 kinds of grass, or two of the three kinds . . . Same thing. Grass blooms, she's either sneezing or taking allergy meds. If it was something that troubled her all year, I'd insider shots, but she just has a few rough weeks in the spring and fall. The allergy testing was like something out of an alien abduction movie. Not fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have a few questions about your dairy-free trial, if you don't mind: do you track asthma in any extra-special way during the trial, like with a daily check with the peak flow meter? do you eliminate butter in baked goods? How soon did you see improvement?

 

Thanks :)

 

 

She doesn't have asthma. Her symptoms are migraines, red-rimmed itchy eyes, dark circle, snoring, stomachaches( that looks misspelled)

 

I did not let her have any dairy at all. We don't really eat baked goods. It was about a week in before I saw a difference. We lasted another week and then it fell apart. (Finger and thumb in the shape of an "L" on my forehead.)

 

The next week it was back to headaches and red eyes. *sigh*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blood test is controversial? I didn't know that.

 

No worries - there's a normal blood test for IgE (the RAST test, I think?). That is not controversial, at least not very. We haven't done bloodwork with the allergist yet, though we may decide to do that too.

 

I'm not talking about that one. The test I'm talking about is for IgG. It is unproven, controversial, etc., and allergists don't typically order it. Our nutritionist is ordering it. I can't decide whether to just do the trial, if the results might not be accurate anyway, KWIM? On the other hand, avoiding dairy and wheat is a little tricky for someone who has milk and crackers for lunch every day (at school), and I haven't quite decided what to give him in his lunch, er, what he might eat. I've been practicing baking with protein powder and GF flours, LOL, in preparation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've had negative results on blood tests and then an anaphylactic reaction. Man, was that test ever wrong!

I've found elimination diet to be most helpful in figuring it out.

3-4 weeks if being free of the allergens was when we saw huge improvements. It took a few weeks.

Worth it! But so much work!

Hope you figure it out! It's so hard! {hugs}

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She doesn't have asthma. Her symptoms are migraines, red-rimmed itchy eyes, dark circle, snoring, stomachaches( that looks misspelled)

 

I did not let her have any dairy at all. We don't really eat baked goods. It was about a week in before I saw a difference. We lasted another week and then it fell apart. (Finger and thumb in the shape of an "L" on my forehead.)

 

The next week it was back to headaches and red eyes. *sigh*

 

Thanks. Remind her about the dairy next time she has a migraine? :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

I thought for sure that she would react to dairy. She didn't, but when I eliminated it for 2 weeks in January her red eyes went away and she did not complain of headaches. They came back when we added it back in.

 

Perhaps you know this already, so forgive me. I don't mean to insult, but, do you know their are different types of allergy. The kind they did today was probably the kind that looks for an IgE reaction. That's the kind that gives you hives, anaphylaxis , wheezing, sneezing, sniffles, etc. But, there is also an IgG reaction that can occur with food proteins that takes a different type of test to detect.

 

It is quite possible that your daughter IS allergic to dairy. Our allergist says "a positive is a positive, but a negative means nothing!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Perhaps you know this already, so forgive me. I don't mean to insult, but, do you know their are different types of allergy. The kind they did today was probably the kind that looks for an IgE reaction. That's the kind that gives you hives, anaphylaxis , wheezing, sneezing, sniffles, etc. But, there is also an IgG reaction that can occur with food proteins that takes a different type of test to detect.

 

It is quite possible that your daughter IS allergic to dairy. Our allergist says "a positive is a positive, but a negative means nothing!"

 

*sigh* so, did you find the IgG helpful? I was just in the middle of talking myself out of it in this thread...

 

I'm on the fence about it. We actually had ds's blood drawn (a challenge in and of itself) but then there was a problem with the sample (not enough). I don't know if I want to go through the trouble. I guess we should, but if we do, we need to do it prior to starting a dairy-free trial. I really want to get to the bottom of this... waiting is frustrating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Perhaps you know this already, so forgive me. I don't mean to insult, but, do you know their are different types of allergy. The kind they did today was probably the kind that looks for an IgE reaction. That's the kind that gives you hives, anaphylaxis , wheezing, sneezing, sniffles, etc. But, there is also an IgG reaction that can occur with food proteins that takes a different type of test to detect.

 

It is quite possible that your daughter IS allergic to dairy. Our allergist says "a positive is a positive, but a negative means nothing!"

 

 

 

Not insulting at all. Like I said, I have 5 kids and we have never dealt with any of this before. I did not know about the different kinds of tests. That makes sense, though, given the symptoms that she has. Most of them are not related to the IgE test. Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I was waiting for the testing today. DD said she is not eliminating it again because it didn't show up. She loves dairy. I want to try again just to see.

 

The classic allergist line is, "Reactions trump results." If she got better on no dairy, then she may be sensitive to dairy in some way. My oldest tested negative on the skin test but positive on a scope biopsy (dairy allergy as allergic esophagitis instead of the classic allergy). Are you keeping the cat and dog? Ds also tested positive to dogs and severely allergic to cats, and we have the Family Cat. After a couple of months to adjust to the idea we are looking for a retirement home for him among our friends.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

The classic allergist line is, "Reactions trump results." If she got better on no dairy, then she may be sensitive to dairy in some way. My oldest tested negative on the skin test but positive on a scope biopsy (dairy allergy as allergic esophagitis instead of the classic allergy). Are you keeping the cat and dog? Ds also tested positive to dogs and severely allergic to cats, and we have the Family Cat. After a couple of months to adjust to the idea we are looking for a retirement home for him among our friends.

We are keeping the cat. The dog was a higher reaction. We have two dogs and are already looking for a home for one of them for an unrelated reason. We haven't decided on the other.

The cat allergy was the low end of reactions and all five kids would be devastated. I am sorry you have to find a new home for yours. It has to be a hard decision.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Negatives mean, almost always, no IgE mediated allergy. Positives (for foods) can be false positives 50 percent of the time. You confirm with actual reactions when consuming the foods. Actual reactions also trump negative food test results but those are much less common than false positives.

 

I do not think well done studies support the accuracy of IgG testing. This doesn't mean there aren't non-Ige mediated reactions or food intolerances. But I don't think IgG tests can, at this point, accurately identify them. It's much better to do an elimination diet or rotation diet and track by symptom changes if you suspect non-Ige mediated issues imo.

 

Lowering the "allergy bucket" by controlling environmentals as much as possible, treating asthma, treating eczema, and avoiding food allergens can help manage some allergies-particularly if they are already low level in a person. At least that's the take of some top allergists. In my experience I wouldn't expect it to help more severe already existing allergies.

 

Positive allergy tests for environmentals are much more accurate than food positives. That said, for outdoor allergies, what are you going to do about them? Unless you're doing allergy shots identifying particular outdoors just doesn't make sense to me. My son has IgE food allergies and lots of indoor and outdoor allergies too. For the outdoors we just do allergy meds, showers after being outside during allergy seasons, and HEPA filters. On really bad pollen days he stays inside because it's just miserable the next day for him and will often induce an asthma flair to top it all off. You might think about local honey (though this would be potential help for coming seasons, not this season) or allergy shots perhaps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could try sheep milk yoghurt and sheep milk cheese. Cheeses are available at most health food stores and Trader Joe's, sheep milk yoghurt I have only seen at Whole Foods. I react to cow milk but not goat or sheep milk. Sheep cheese is much yummier than goat cheese to me. For milk substitutes, I like rice milk with cereal and oat milk in a gravy or baked/cooked food. The only cooking that rice milk is helpful for is a lighter/sweeter dessert, usually oat milk is better for cooking. (I make a "shake" out of rice milk, vanilla, and frozen chopped bananas.) Oat milk is also better than rice milk in coffee or hot cocoa.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Positive allergy tests for environmentals are much more accurate than food positives. That said, for outdoor allergies, what are you going to do about them? Unless you're doing allergy shots identifying particular outdoors just doesn't make sense to me. My son has IgE food allergies and lots of indoor and outdoor allergies too. For the outdoors we just do allergy meds, showers after being outside during allergy seasons, and HEPA filters. On really bad pollen days he stays inside because it's just miserable the next day for him and will often induce an asthma flair to top it all off. You might think about local honey (though this would be potential help for coming seasons, not this season) or allergy shots perhaps.

 

The reason I took her in was because I wanted her dairy allergy confirmed. That didn't happen. I had no idea specific trees would be identified.

We do have a place that sells local honey. I might try that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...