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Landlord wants to sell the house--how do we handle some issues? Please help.


Harriet Vane
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Our lease is up at the end of March, and our landlord has decided to sell the house. She has been wonderful in many ways. She's very friendly, and has had things repaired promptly. She also has been very kind to my son, allowing him to garden fairly extensively and giving him tips. (The garden was/is very dear to her, and in our lease the yard work is specifically NOT our responsibility. However, when ds asked, she willingly "gave" him several patches to work with and has been really sweet when she is here answering his questions and showing him things.)

 

We'd like our full damage deposit back, and we'd also like to continue to preserve our good relationship with her.

 

The house is on the market (one week now). We agreed to accommodate showings, and I have agreed to every showing that has been requested (many, every day this week), including those with less than 24hrs notice. I decluttered BIG TIME for this (I know what it takes to sell a house). We don't leave for showings (way too disruptive to my teen's study schedule) but we have tried hard to accommodate in every other way. We have kept the house perfectly clean for showings. Even though we don't leave, my kids and I just go in the office and work quietly--it hasn't been a problem as far as I can tell. ???

 

Here are my questions:

 

--The house is set up with a formal living room in the front and another living room in the back. The one in the back has a beautiful stone wall with a fireplace and a gorgeous, rustic mantel. When we first moved in, we made both rooms into living rooms with couches--two white loveseats in the front with a baby grand piano, and a blue couch in the back with the TV cabinet. HOWEVER, that year for Christmas we decided to buy a ping-pong table. We crammed the blue couch and the TV cabinet in the front living room with the white couches and piano and TV cabinet. It looks cramped, but we were renting and it worked for us. The back living room with the fireplace now has a long row of bookshelves against one wall, and the ping pong table dominates the center of the room. I also have an exercise ball and weights and two foam rollers back in the corner. I have to keep the exercise stuff out somewhere because I use it several times a week. The realtor and the landlord both hate the ping pong table in that pretty room, and apparently several other realtors have given negative feedback on it. Obviously they cannot force us to move it, but they have asked more than once if we would mind moving it--it's obviously bothering the landlord a lot. Dh and ds are both emotional about this and do not want it put in the garage--they play on it nearly every day. The other problem is that there will be no room for the car in the garage, and the weather is still cold and wet, with snow predicted for next week. None of us want to put the stuff in the garage, but we also want the landlord to be happy. I am of two minds--we are moving by the end of March--should we just do this for her? Or not?

 

--When we moved in, the carpets reeked of dog. The landlord and I split the cost for carpet cleaning, and the cleaner did note on the invoice numerous pet stains in the carpet. Over time, those stains have reappeared. I am afraid the landlord will try to charge us for this but we will obviously point out the cleaner's comments on the bill. She is worried about the stains visible for showing the house. I was planning to try to clean the worst of them when we move (end of March), but the house is showing NOW, and the landlord is worried because she really wants to sell the house (and I am sympathetic to that). There are stains in every room on the first floor. It will take time for those spots to dry if cleaned, and we have no choice but to continue living here, schooling full-time, and packing. Landlord has offered to come over with her steamer. I am concerned that we will make the wet spots dirtier by being here. I would also rather clean the house once--when we move--rather than tackling stains now and then redoing when we move so I can get my full deposit back. Any advice?

 

--Along the lines of the ping pong table, should I put my blue couch in the garage? It will make the room much less crowded. However, moving it will not be simple. I cannot help because of neck/back issues, so we would have to ask my bil to come help. The only way to get the couch out is by taking off the door and doing some VERY delicate, elaborate maneuvering--it was HARD to get in. And once the couch is in the garage, the car cannot go in there. The landlord suggested putting it in the fireplace room in place of the ping-pong table. This can be done more easily because there is a patio door that is much wider. But that goes back to wondering whether or not to move the ping pong table--in addition to garage issues, we would still have to get someone big and strong to help with that process.

 

--And another living room question. There is a fancy wooden valance-thingey over the windows in the living room and dining room. Landlord wants to hang gorgeous, formal burgundy drapes with a gold stripey (burgungy and green skinny stripes on gold field) cloth valance (attaches to the wooden valance, which reaches from the window to the ceiling). I don't care if the drapes are up, but they look hideous with the blue couch. Any thoughts?

 

Please help and advise. Thanks!!

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Guest inoubliable

It sounds like your landlord is a lovely person and it doesn't sound like she's asking much. It's only your "problem" for another six weeks, right? I'd go ahead and accommodate her as best I could. Could your DH and DS not play the ping pong table when it's in the garage?

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Re the ping pong table--I did realize after posting that I may be able to move a big, black box in the room to clear a spot to put the folded-up ping pong table. (It's a large, black vinyl box in which we store blankets and use as a bench). That may be a good compromise.

 

Dh is under a lot of pressure at work in this season, and he really doesn't want to move the ping pong table. He loves playing ping pong with the kids after work. Dh is the most laid-back man on the planet, and doesn't usually fuss about anything. It's uncharacteristic of him to insist on something like this, so if he needs to be able to play ping pong with the kids, then I want to make that happen for him. The problem is that I also understand the landlord's concerns and want to make her happy too.

 

The other issue is parking our car outside. Dh doesn't see this as a big deal, but I DREAD scraping it when there is bad weather. I can probably get over it, though, if need be.

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If landlord wants to hang drapes that clash with your couch, make sure the realtor knows you are not to blame.

 

I'll go way out on a limb with this suggestion. . . The landlord is antsy about some of your furnishings. She should pay for a storage facility if she is the person wanting something gone. I admit that I never have been in your situation; however, I do think it a fair viewpoint.

 

P.S. What I'm working through is a perspective that even though the landlord wants to sell her house, the house is not lived in by her, nor is it furnished by her. You manage your own belongings, and it sounds as if you already are trying very hard to assist the selling process.

 

It is unreasonable to think that you would park your car outside if you live in a snow area.

 

You have arrangements in place for your next dwelling -- [is that correct?] -- and will be moving soon. I do not see asking your family to perform heroics. If the realtors don't like something, tell them politely that you don't like it either, but there is nowhere else for the item(s) AND you soon will be living elsewhere.

 

It is a truth universally acknowledged that realtors are wholly irrational when it comes to demanding a selling family to strip a house nearly bare yet continue to live in it. The house WILL sell.

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I'd do my best to help her sell the house. You're going to move out. I'd move the ping pong table. Not like it's going to be forever.

 

 

When it comes down to it, you're probably right.

 

Part of me wants all these prospective buyers to grow up and look around the stupid table.

 

Part of me wants to please my darling dh, who doesn't ask for much.

 

Part of me is sympathetic to my landlord, who has been a blessing to us.

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I'll voice the unpopular opinion. You're paying rent to use the house and since your family uses the ping pong table on a regular basis, I wouldn't move it unless you want to. The same with the other things- if she wants to compensate you or offer other considerations, then maybe. But you're letting them show it frequently- and with short notice.

 

If the house will sell quickly with the ping pong table moved and the carpet cleaned, then she won't have to wait long after you move out to have the house sold. If the market in the area is such that it'll take months to sell the house, there's no rush to make those changes now while she has paying tenants. What's a few more weeks if the market generally takes months?

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I'd tell her that if she waives 50% of your rent for the rest of the time you are there and guarantees your full deposit back (barring major destruction/damage), you'll move out the ping pong table and the couch and whatever other junk she or the realtor wants (within reason). You'll also tidy/clean/vacate for showings so long as you are given 24 hrs notice, and you'll also TRY to vacate for last minute showings. You'll also move out on time and clean up decently when you do.

 

If she puts the terms in writing (above), then I'd be glad to do what she's asking.

 

You have already done A LOT for her, and MUCH more than most renters would do.

 

If I were in the landlord's shoes, I'd be delighted to agree to the above terms. In fact, if I were in a hurry to sell, I'd do more, probably completely free rent and a bonus for moving out on time.

 

Her nightmare is you being messy, not cooperating with showings, and not moving out on time, making her evict you. You are being great, IMHO. It's HER house to sell, not YOURS. (And, I am a landlord, so I am see it from both sides.)

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Instead of accommodating her, I'd make moves that will help you move. I'd start looking for a place to move to and if you find something ahead of schedule, move early.

 

I'd consider storing stuff in one of those pods that can be delivered to your new location to facilitate the move and lighten the load.

 

And honestly all the stuff dilemmas are much less worse than staying for showings. I understand why you don't leave, but as a buyer to me that is a total killer; they are unable to talk about the house while they are in it. That's why I suggest getting out quicker.

 

The converse of all you have posted, is that your landlord could have waited to put the house on the market until you had moved out. I appreciate that there is high traffic, but the truth is that prime season doesn't really start until after March. Putting the house on now might sell it earlier for her, but it could also cause the house to be stale when the market really gets going in Spring.

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Instead of accommodating her, I'd make moves that will help you move. I'd start looking for a place to move to and if you find something ahead of schedule, move early.

 

I'd consider storing stuff in one of those pods that can be delivered to your new location to facilitate the move and lighten the load.

 

And honestly all the stuff dilemmas are much less worse than staying for showings. I understand why you don't leave, but as a buyer to me that is a total killer; they are unable to talk about the house while they are in it. That's why I suggest getting out quicker.

 

The converse of all you have posted, is that your landlord could have waited to put the house on the market until you had moved out. I appreciate that there is high traffic, but the truth is that prime season doesn't really start until after March. Putting the house on now might sell it earlier for her, but it could also cause the house to be stale when the market really gets going in Spring.

 

 

I just cannot move early. We do have the next place planned, and can go there whenever. However, I teach four very demanding outside classes (three are high school honors level, and one is junior high and not as difficult), two on Monday and two on Friday. For three of those, I have no one on whom I can call to sub--it's all on me. The end of our lease coincides with a two-week break from those classes. In addition to my part-time work teaching, I am also assisting dh with some job-related administrative projects. I cannot imagine packing any quicker than I am now, and I cannot imagine trying to deal with the moving chaos while also teaching these classes/working.

 

Also moving early requires me to rent the pod early ($$). (We are planning to store quite a bit of stuff as the next, hopefully temporary, place is much smaller than this house.) We were thinking of having professional movers both move us into the next home AND pack the pod for us (because they are stronger and better at packing a container than we are). If I get the pod early, I have to pack it myself (not a good idea because of back issues) or beg friends to help or hire movers twice.

 

I do not think the landlord would agree to give us a break on the rent, as I know she is upside-down on the house as is, and my rent does not cover what the house costs her.

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Just throwing this out there, since I don't know the how close your new location is or whether you're already allowed to move things there, or will have to start paying to be there as well once things are there. Could you move the ping pong table to the new location and potentially the two or three other items that may be bothering her? If it's close enough, your dh and kids could unwind at the new place and then return home.

 

It sounds horrifically stressful. :grouphug: and best wishes.

 

Erica in OR

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I'd let her bring the steam cleaner over. I use mine all the time and it dries very quickly. If I steam in the morning, it's easily dry by afternoon. Sometimes I just steam lean before bed. I'd treat the stains with spot shot, then steam everything. It costs nothing if she owns the machine.

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I sorta feel like if she wants the house to show without all your stuff in it, she should have waited until you moved out to put it on the market.

 

You are paying to live there. I think you should get to live there without major inconveniences.

 

I would probably let her steam clean and hang curtains. I would not move a ping pong table out that is played with daily. I would not be willing to spend money to store items so the house will show better.

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Thanks for all the input.

 

I want to emphasize that the landlord is not being pushy (or not purposely, and not much anyway). She's worried about owning a property she cannot afford to own. She lost quite a bit on it the last time it was on the market for many months, vacant, trying to sell. She never wanted to be a landlord but was forced into it by the economy and her house not selling. I have really appreciated how sweet she's been to us, and how responsive to repair needs or my son's desire to garden.

 

I know that I have the right to refuse any of what I posted. However, as I mentioned, I would like to maintain our positive relationship, and make sure I get my deposit back in full. And if it is in my power to help her, I would like to do so. Just pondering how much we can give versus what is too much.

 

Right now I think we'll try the following:

 

--We'll move the black box so that the ping pong table can be stowed against the wall when not in use. It's easy to fold it and move it.

 

--If she wants to steam the carpet, so be it. I will mention the concern about getting the carpet dirtier if it's wet and see how she wants to handle it.

 

--If she wants to hang the drapes, so be it. I will ask her to consider how it looks with the blue couch, and she can make whatever decision she wants. It doesn't bother me to have the drapes up. She prides herself on her decorator's sense, so I can ask the question and let her be happy with whatever decision she wishes to make.

 

--For now, I want to keep the car in the garage. Next week's snow might be the last bad weather--after that it may not be as big a deal. This one I will just have to wait on and see how it goes.

 

Thanks again for the input. I welcome any further thoughts.

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I'd tell her that if she waives 50% of your rent for the rest of the time you are there and guarantees your full deposit back (barring major destruction/damage), you'll move out the ping pong table and the couch and whatever other junk she or the realtor wants (within reason). You'll also tidy/clean/vacate for showings so long as you are given 24 hrs notice, and you'll also TRY to vacate for last minute showings. You'll also move out on time and clean up decently when you do.

 

If she puts the terms in writing (above), then I'd be glad to do what she's asking.

 

You have already done A LOT for her, and MUCH more than most renters would do.

 

If I were in the landlord's shoes, I'd be delighted to agree to the above terms. In fact, if I were in a hurry to sell, I'd do more, probably completely free rent and a bonus for moving out on time.

 

Her nightmare is you being messy, not cooperating with showings, and not moving out on time, making her evict you. You are being great, IMHO. It's HER house to sell, not YOURS. (And, I am a landlord, so I am see it from both sides.)

 

 

I think this is unreasonable to ask the landlord to cut the rent by 50%? Won't happen in this universe.

 

Landlords aren't in the business of subsidizing tenants. She's asked that a pool table be moved, and that is not unreasonable when the tenant knows the landlord is selling. To demand a deposit back prior to move out is unreasonable as well. It sounds as if the tenant in place will get the deposit from this nice landlord anyway, if they didn't do any damage (which it sounds as if they did not). But never, ever is it given in advance of moveout. Anything could happen and its the only money there is for repairs.

 

It's a rare tenant whom I would leave in place to show a house. But the ones I do, I compensate well, but it's on my terms depending on the cooperation of the tenant, not extracted from me like this. In fact, the tenant gets more for great efforts and if the house sells (or rents) quickly. If a tenant reacted this way, i'd just get them out ASAP and then sell.

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Thanks for all the input.

 

I want to emphasize that the landlord is not being pushy (or not purposely, and not much anyway). She's worried about owning a property she cannot afford to own. She lost quite a bit on it the last time it was on the market for many months, vacant, trying to sell. She never wanted to be a landlord but was forced into it by the economy and her house not selling. I have really appreciated how sweet she's been to us, and how responsive to repair needs or my son's desire to garden.

 

I know that I have the right to refuse any of what I posted. However, as I mentioned, I would like to maintain our positive relationship, and make sure I get my deposit back in full. And if it is in my power to help her, I would like to do so. Just pondering how much we can give versus what is too much.

 

Right now I think we'll try the following:

 

--We'll move the black box so that the ping pong table can be stowed against the wall when not in use. It's easy to fold it and move it.

 

--If she wants to steam the carpet, so be it. I will mention the concern about getting the carpet dirtier if it's wet and see how she wants to handle it.

 

--If she wants to hang the drapes, so be it. I will ask her to consider how it looks with the blue couch, and she can make whatever decision she wants. It doesn't bother me to have the drapes up. She prides herself on her decorator's sense, so I can ask the question and let her be happy with whatever decision she wishes to make.

 

--For now, I want to keep the car in the garage. Next week's snow might be the last bad weather--after that it may not be as big a deal. This one I will just have to wait on and see how it goes.

 

Thanks again for the input. I welcome any further thoughts.

 

 

You sound eminently reasonable. I'm sure it will all go well. Steam cleaned carpets are dry in almost no time, if they are done properly, with a truck-mounted steam cleaning unit (not little hand units).

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I think this is unreasonable to ask the landlord to cut the rent by 50%? Won't happen in this universe.

 

Landlords aren't in the business of subsidizing tenants. She's asked that a pool table be moved, and that is not unreasonable when the tenant knows the landlord is selling. To demand a deposit back prior to move out is unreasonable as well. It sounds as if the tenant in place will get the deposit from this nice landlord anyway, if they didn't do any damage (which it sounds as if they did not). But never, ever is it given in advance of moveout. Anything could happen and its the only money there is for repairs.

 

It's a rare tenant whom I would leave in place to show a house. But the ones I do, I compensate well, but it's on my terms depending on the cooperation of the tenant, not extracted from me like this. In fact, the tenant gets more for great efforts and if the house sells (or rents) quickly. If a tenant reacted this way, i'd just get them out ASAP and then sell.

 

Oh, well, that's fine. It's all BUSINESS, so whatever both parties agree to is fine. I'd not suggest being mean or petty, and frankly, I think it's a fair offer from both sides, which is why I suggested it.

 

We lose about 3 months rent every time we change tenants, and we've never even had a problem with tenants. That's just no-rent time to move in/move out, fix unreported problems, cost to make repairs and repaint, or whatever else needs done we didn't know about.

 

We're not in the landlord business to make money, it's just a happenstance that we happen to own a residence we don't want to sell (and can only rent to people who we very much trust b/c it is located adjacent to our primary commercial business), so we may as well make a *little* more money than leaving it empty, so I can imagine that I am probably more generous to our tenants than someone who really does it as a living would be. No doubt, I'd be broke if being a landlord were our primary income! ;)

 

But, nonetheless, I am a landlord, and I'd never expect a tenant to move things or change their lives to accommodate my desire to sell the house. I don't think that's reasonable. If I were asking them to do anything, I'd be compensating them. They've only got weeks left in their lease, so cutting the rent by half isn't much $$. In the landlord's shoes, I'd be thrilled to have any option to get what I want. I'd be nervous about the tenant's getting out at all, let alone asking them to go to such great lengths to sell MY house.

 

I do know of enough horror stories from landlords completely screwed over by tenants that if *I* were about to sell a property and needed otherwise good tenants to get out, *I* would be overly generous to get them to cooperate and *I* would be glad to receive an offer like the one I outlined, as *I* see it as a win-win.

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'StephanieZ' :

Oh, well, that's fine. It's all BUSINESS, so whatever both parties agree to is fine. I'd not suggest being mean or petty, and frankly, I think it's a fair offer from both sides, which is why I suggested it.

 

We lose about 3 months rent every time we change tenants, and we've never even had a problem with tenants. That's just no-rent time to move in/move out, fix unreported problems, cost to make repairs and repaint, or whatever else needs done we didn't know about.

 

Oh yes. I know. I wonder if we will ever make money!

 

 

We're not in the landlord business to make money, it's just a happenstance that we happen to own a residence we don't want to sell (and can only rent to people who we very much trust b/c it is located adjacent to our primary commercial business), so we may as well make a *little* more money than leaving it empty, so I can imagine that I am probably more generous to our tenants than someone who really does it as a living would be. No doubt, I'd be broke if being a landlord were our primary income! ;)

 

Right. We subsidize the business. It doesn't subsidize us. Our tenants have no idea that they get stuff way before I do. All of them have nicer appliances and even bathrooms!

 

 

But, nonetheless, I am a landlord, and I'd never expect a tenant to move things or change their lives to accommodate my desire to sell the house. I don't think that's reasonable. If I were asking them to do anything, I'd be compensating them. They've only got weeks left in their lease, so cutting the rent by half isn't much $$. In the landlord's shoes, I'd be thrilled to have any option to get what I want. I'd be nervous about the tenant's getting out at all, let alone asking them to go to such great lengths to sell MY house.

 

But it is just a pool table. I'd ask them to move that, but I'd give them some money too. I just compensate good helpful attitudes more. My last move out made an extra $300 as well as his full deposit back. Those people were great and extremely helpful, and never asked for much at all.

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I sorta feel like if she wants the house to show without all your stuff in it, she should have waited until you moved out to put it on the market.

 

You are paying to live there. I think you should get to live there without major inconveniences.

 

I would probably let her steam clean and hang curtains. I would not move a ping pong table out that is played with daily. I would not be willing to spend money to store items so the house will show better.

 

 

 

I agree with this. If the landlord wants to spend the money to rent you a storage space or Pod for a few items (NOT the ping pong table!) to make the house look bigger - she may. Otherwise - make a small posterboard of a dining room table and set it on the ping ping table during viewings - or throw a cheap tablecloth over the ping pong table with a note "you will want a dining room table here - current residents play ping pong ;-) "

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We have never gotten a deposit back when leasing from and individual and always have when leasing an apartment and no we haven't left the places in bad shape. I wouldn't count on getting the deposit back no matter what you do especially if your landlord is having financial problems anyway.

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Re the ping pong table--I did realize after posting that I may be able to move a big, black box in the room to clear a spot to put the folded-up ping pong table. (It's a large, black vinyl box in which we store blankets and use as a bench). That may be a good compromise.

 

Dh is under a lot of pressure at work in this season, and he really doesn't want to move the ping pong table. He loves playing ping pong with the kids after work. Dh is the most laid-back man on the planet, and doesn't usually fuss about anything. It's uncharacteristic of him to insist on something like this, so if he needs to be able to play ping pong with the kids, then I want to make that happen for him. The problem is that I also understand the landlord's concerns and want to make her happy too.

 

The other issue is parking our car outside. Dh doesn't see this as a big deal, but I DREAD scraping it when there is bad weather. I can probably get over it, though, if need be.

 

 

I would dread the car issue the most. I don't know where you live or how much snow you get, but one way around that if it's not tons of snow is to go out and start the car ahead of time with the defrost on full blast. I've done that in the past when I didn't have a garage. Not a total solution, but no scraping was necessary.

 

ETA: Really, it seems like it would have been wiser for her to wait until you move out if she wants the house to show a certain way. It sounds like your moving date is only weeks away. I have to wonder why she has to inconvenience you so much when she could just wait a short amount of time before selling?

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With the deposit, just make sure you document whatever you can. We spent almost a year in a rental during a move, and we quickly realized our LL was a snake. We started being very careful to document everything. Photos of condition of house when we moved in, etc. and I made sure to do the same as we moved out. I took a LOT of photos. When the time came to get out deposit back, he also conveniently missed the time period in my state, kept stalling, but no explanation at all. In my state, a deposit not returned within a certain period of time allows you to push for 2x the deposit in small claims court. I didn't want to go that route, but it took threatening that to get him to refund our deposit. My advice is to always, always know the landlord/tenant laws in your state before you need them if you have any doubt. She may be a great LL and respectable individual, but if she's under the gun financially, I'd be careful to document whatever you can now. Any chance you have photos or correspondence with her about the stains that were there from the previous occupant? Just be sure you document whatever you can, and dig up any old photos or correspondence about existing issues just in case.

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I would let her steam clean. I wouldn't move my things around. You may be a renter but right now it is your home and you should be able to utilize the space in a way that works for your family.

 

You shouldn't have to move something you use daily into the garage (ping pong table), you shouldn't have to move your couch and you shouldn't have to park outside. Those are things you might be willing to suck up if it were your house you were selling and you would be getting a return for doing them but not as a renter.

 

If you are feeling generous it wouldn't hurt to offer to move things around in exchange for a decrease in your rent for the last 6 weeks (to account for the inconvenience) but I certainly wouldn't feel obligated to do so.

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I would not go out of my way to move anything. She has not given you any compensation except more requests. You are renters, not owners, and I have looked at plenty of rented houses with the renters present. There is no guarantee she will give you everything back, so I would not do anything extra for her. She still has a lease to honor. She cannot ask you to rearrange your life to suit hers. If she wants to show the house her way, she needs to wait for you to move out.

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Asking to move a ping pong table that is used daily by a family would be about equal to asking you to remove your TV. It's family entertainmen, so same thing.

 

Just tell her "Sorry we can't do more. There just is no place to move the ping pong table. It's too cold out to put it in the garage and play, and besides there isn't enough room in the garage for both and my car which is parked there. (Putting out the expectation that yes, you do and will park in the garage). "

 

I'm sure when the realator orginally talked with here, the last thing she was thinking was homeschool family = home all day, not leaving for showings (which I certainly wouldn't in the middle of school/work) and having entertainment outside a giant electric box. And sadly, if you had a tv the size of a folded up ping pong table against the wall, no one would question that at all.

 

I'm thinking you are moving end of March, but could be wrong. Truthfully if she isn't getting anywhere she should pull it at the end of Feb. Wait for you to move out and re-list. Then it will have a fresh MLS number. If it stays on the market now till after you move out, everyone knows how long it's been on the market and will wonder why it's been on that long. Pull and start again so the MLS is new and it will look like it just went on the market.

 

 

Oh and we have always gotten our deposit back on our houses.

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I'm baffled though. Do people buy a house because they like how the furniture in it is arranged? People really have no imagination beyond that? Geesh

 

We bought a rental and the renters WERE a deterrent.

 

Their stuff prevented us from seeing everything we wanted to see. And its not really kosher to move someone else's stuff.

 

When they left, we did find some long scratches/holes that had been hidden before.

 

And it was uncomfortable to walk through the house/look with the renters there.

 

I think we would never have had a chance at this house if he hadn't had the renters there. Someone else would have snatched it up.

 

ETA: there were large screen TVs in every bedroom of the house, plus the living room. The TV in the bedrooms were attached to the wall with a a TV-holding device. They took the devices and the TV, and left the holes (I guess I was naieve to expect other renters would fix the holes they put in the wall. Luckily my 5 year old son can do that and he fixed them, and enjoyed being helpful). They also took the ceiling fan/light. Which was very surprising to use as it left the room without light. We'd already planned on replacing it since the fan was not working. But still... to just yank it out of the wall?!

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We bought a rental and the renters WERE a deterrent.

 

...I guess I was naieve to expect other renters would fix the holes they put in the wall. Luckily my 5 year old son can do that and he fixed them, and enjoyed being helpful). They also took the ceiling fan/light. Which was very surprising to use as it left the room without light. We'd already planned on replacing it since the fan was not working. But still... to just yank it out of the wall?!

 

 

These things weren't the renters fault. They were the seller's fault. The seller should have corrected everything before you closed on the house - it's his problem to collect the damages from HIS renter.

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We are landlords and I would NEVER ask a tenant to move stuff or prepare for showings while the renters have a legal right to be in the house. It's not the tenant's job to have the house up to snuff for that. And daily showings??? That's insane.

 

If the garage is part of the lease and the landlord doesn't want you to use it as a garage, then she owes you compensation for that, and only if you agree to it.

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These things weren't the renters fault. They were the seller's fault. The seller should have corrected everything before you closed on the house - it's his problem to collect the damages from HIS renter.

 

I have NEVER left a rental and not fixed the holes (from hanging pictures, etc) on the way out.

 

In this case, the seller was overseas. Yes he should have figured out a way to make sure the house was left presentable. But he didn't and we didn't want to scuttle the deal over it.

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I have NEVER left a rental and not fixed the holes (from hanging pictures, etc) on the way out.

 

In this case, the seller was overseas. Yes he should have figured out a way to make sure the house was left presentable. But he didn't and we didn't want to scuttle the deal over it.

 

FWIW, I never would either. I was an apartment building manager for a year, and know all too well how some tenants choose to leave things. I have always vowed to never be like that.

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I have been in this position (renting a condo, mom died, daughters want to sell). The listing noted that renters were in the condo, I had no transportation at the time and the neighborhood was not walkable, they never asked me to leave. I couldn't have. It is up to the owners to have an agent who knows how to list it. You have gone beyond what is needed. No way I could have done 1 hour notice showings with a small baby.

As far as moving things around, are you planning to keep the blue sofa? If not think about selling some stuff now to make your move easier. If she wants to pay for movers and a storage unit, that is another story all together. If the agent asks again, something along the lines of "Well with my health problems we will be hiring movers to move us out, so moving stuff right now is not do able for us. If you have another solution, feel free to suggest it to the owner". Then the agent might suggest to the owner unlisting till after you guys are out.

And based on experience if your owner is under water, I wouldn't hold my breath about getting a deposit back. At least take pictures on move out date, maybe have a friend be there with you to document condition on move out. She may not HAVE the money to give back to you.

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