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I tutored a student in Seton's chemistry course, and the text compared a chemical reaction to the transubstantiation of the bread and wine at mass. 

 

I wish I were kidding. 

 

that makes no sense - not even from a religious prospective.  I thought a central tennet of transubstantiation was that the substence was transformed, but the accidents (meaning everything physically observable) were not.  I'm not religious, but I think if I was I'd object to that on the grounds that it's comparing something sacred, holy, and miraculous to a mechanical process that's mundane and completely quantifiable.  I don't think we (the collective we that is humanity) do ourselves any favors on either the science or theology fronts by insisting that they must convolve on all topics.

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I tutored a student in Seton's chemistry course, and the text compared a chemical reaction to the transubstantiation of the bread and wine at mass. 

 

I wish I were kidding. 

 

I just wanted to say that I "liked" your post because of your contribution to the chem conversation and not because I agree with using transubstantiation as an example of a chemical reaction. :)

 

That's just...  Not good.

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Did anyone take the WTMA Chemistry course this year? Looking for some feedback on the course. This course looked so amazing to us and I was happy about the text, Conceptual Chemistry, but after reviewing the syllabus I got a little concerned about the "primary sources:"

 

Primary Sources: (Can be purchased, checked out from library, or read online)

Boyle, Robert. The Sceptical Chymist (1661)

Lavoisier, Antoine. Elements of Chemistry (1790) (Any English translation)

 
My dd loves science but will not be a science major and for a non-honors or AP course this reading material seems very advanced (and dare I say a bit long- the second source is 640 pages long according to Amazon).  I have not read the material so I might be completely off on my observation. So, I am looking for any input. Can anyone share any info with me about the course? About the Primary Sources? Please feel free to PM if you do not want to post publicly. Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

 

Edited by counselinggirl
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I'm considering 

General Chemistry: The Essential Concepts by Raymond Chang

for Chem next year.

 

The OP includes a link to a sequence used by an honors chem class (http://www.doctortan...istry/units.htm) that seems reasonable.

I notice that it doesn't move through the book very linearly, though.  Has anyone tried this?  Was there an issue w/ lack of continuity or chapters/problems referencing concepts from earlier in the book that hadn't been studied in the outline yet?

 

Finally - anyone have a reference to testing materials?  We've been using the publisher-provided chapter/unit exams for ML Bio and it's been great - I like not having to make stuff up and DC feel confident they are getting a bio class that's 'as hard as' their PS peers.

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I'm considering 

General Chemistry: The Essential Concepts by Raymond Chang

for Chem next year.

 

The OP includes a link to a sequence used by an honors chem class (http://www.doctortan...istry/units.htm) that seems reasonable.

I notice that it doesn't move through the book very linearly, though.  Has anyone tried this?  Was there an issue w/ lack of continuity or chapters/problems referencing concepts from earlier in the book that hadn't been studied in the outline yet?

 

Finally - anyone have a reference to testing materials?  We've been using the publisher-provided chapter/unit exams for ML Bio and it's been great - I like not having to make stuff up and DC feel confident they are getting a bio class that's 'as hard as' their PS peers.

 

It's the OP. :)  In looking at his order of topics and referencing the text chapters and sections (I've got the book sitting next to me), I think his progression is fine.  He covers kinetics before equilibrium and he does equilibrium before acids/bases and redox.  If a curriculum had the order of any of those reversed, that would be worrisome.

 

The Doctor Tang website does include practice tests and practice exams that include answer keys so that might be somewhere to start for testing materials.  You could also see if you could purchase an instructor's solutions manual for the text and then use the odd numbered problems from the text for your tests.  The text itself doesn't have the solutions for the odd-numbered problems but the instructor's manual should.  The student could then use the even-numbered problems for practice and you can use the odd-numbered ones for your tests.

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It's the OP. :)  In looking at his order of topics and referencing the text chapters and sections (I've got the book sitting next to me), I think his progression is fine.  He covers kinetics before equilibrium and he does equilibrium before acids/bases and redox.  If a curriculum had the order of any of those reversed, that would be worrisome.

 

Thanks!

 

I'm curious why that's preferable to just doing the text in sequence?

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Probably just personal preference on Doctor Tang's part.  Chapters 4, 12, and 13, for example, all deal with the chemistry of solutions so he chose to combine parts from each of those chapters into his second unit rather than have solution chemistry touched on separately 3 different times in the course.  Either way would work - it's just preference on the teacher's part. :)  There are certain chemistry topics that really shouldn't be taught "out of order" (like the ones I mentioned above) but there are other topics that could be taught in a variety of orders with no repercussions.

 

If I was teaching out of the Chang text, I'd probably use Doctor Tang's order - although I might switch around his Unit 2 and Unit 3 order.  My personal preference is to teach quantum theory and bonding before I start in on most everything else but his order works just fine, too. :)

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Thanks!

 

I'm curious why that's preferable to just doing the text in sequence?

 

I've looked at a billion syllabi for chemistry, and I swear no one on earth ever does the book in order. 

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I've looked at a billion syllabi for chemistry, and I swear no one on earth ever does the book in order. 

 

I think it was Regentrude and I who had this conversation once.  At the beginning level, chemistry is an odd subject.  It doesn't really follow a nice, neat linear progression of topics like physics tends to.  In order to understand what we think of as the basics of chemistry (atomic structure), it's actually helpful to have prior knowledge of, paradoxically, a branch of chemistry that's usually considered not-so-basic - quantum theory. :)  It tends to go this way with many of the topics that are considered introductory topics - those introductory topics are actually easier and better explained with prior knowledge of topics that are usually not introductory.  Because of that, the order that intro chem topics are taught can be played around with quite a bit without causing too many problems - again, intro chem doesn't have that nice linear progression of topics that physics does.  Chem is for weirdos, I've decided. ;) :P

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that makes no sense - not even from a religious prospective.  I thought a central tennet of transubstantiation was that the substence was transformed, but the accidents (meaning everything physically observable) were not.  I'm not religious, but I think if I was I'd object to that on the grounds that it's comparing something sacred, holy, and miraculous to a mechanical process that's mundane and completely quantifiable.  I don't think we (the collective we that is humanity) do ourselves any favors on either the science or theology fronts by insisting that they must convolve on all topics.

 

What I don't understand is that Seton uses an ABeka chemistry text for their course. So I wonder how it would even come up. Maybe in the course plans?

 

(Old post but I'm curious.)

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A couple of questions:  Who is this Dr. Tang person who created the wonderfully detailed lesson plan?  

 

Has anyone looked at the Suchoki Conceptual Chemistry text used by the WTMA class?  It gets mixed reviews on Amazon.  

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I am going to use the Novare Chemistry for Accelerated Students next year. I know there has been interest but not many users on the forum, so I will try to thoroughly review it as we go along. I just got the package.

 

I will start a new thread and put the link in here.

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A couple of questions:  Who is this Dr. Tang person who created the wonderfully detailed lesson plan?  

 

Has anyone looked at the Suchoki Conceptual Chemistry text used by the WTMA class?  It gets mixed reviews on Amazon.  

 

:)  I believe Dr. Tang is a high school chemistry teacher (who isn't technically a Dr. - it says at the bottom of his webpage that he has a B.Sc. and a B.Ed.) who has taught in both Alberta and California. :)  If anyone knows him personally, I'd love to hear about it.  I think he needs to know he has an entire following of homeschool moms. :D

 

I have Suchocki's book in front of me.  Was there anything in particular that you'd like to know?  I've not taught out of it but I could probably answer particular questions.

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:)  I believe Dr. Tang is a high school chemistry teacher (who isn't technically a Dr. - it says at the bottom of his webpage that he has a B.Sc. and a B.Ed.) who has taught in both Alberta and California. :)  If anyone knows him personally, I'd love to hear about it.  I think he needs to know he has an entire following of homeschool moms. :D

 

I have Suchocki's book in front of me.  Was there anything in particular that you'd like to know?  I've not taught out of it but I could probably answer particular questions.

 

(I feel like I always need to hear someone's back story, lol.)

 

I went ahead and ordered a used copy of Suchocki, so I'm good after all.  

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Any thoughts on the newest ed of Chang Chem (the 11th, published in 2012) vs the 5th ed (published in 2007) that's listed on dr. Tang's course outline (http://www.doctortang.com/Honour%20Chemistry/units.htm)...or just thoughts on the newest edition, generically?

 

Just realized there are TWO chemistry texts by Chang - 'General Chemistry:Essential Concepts' and 'Chemistry'.  The former is what I'm looking at (Honors Chem, not AP).

 

That said, there's a 7th ed of General Chem from 2013.

(http://www.amazon.com/General-Chemistry-Essential-McGraw-Hill-Engineering/dp/B00E6T3DSM/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1464898165&sr=1-6&keywords=chang+essential+concepts+chemistry+7th+edition and

http://www.amazon.com/Workbook-Solutions-accompany-General-Chemistry/dp/0077623312/ref=pd_cp_14_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=07QHRH26306QHH9C3ZP6)

 

thoughts on the delta between the 7th ed and the earlier versions ('drtang' outline is based on the 5th ed)

 

 

Edited by AEC

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Any thoughts on the newest ed of Chang Chem (the 11th, published in 2012) vs the 5th ed (published in 2007) that's listed on dr. Tang's course outline (http://www.doctortang.com/Honour%20Chemistry/units.htm)...or just thoughts on the newest edition, generically?

 

Dd used either the 10th or 11th edition for PAH AP Chem.  No complaints, good textbook, but we can't compare to older editions.  

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We are looking at ChemAdvantage and the Scholars Online courses for AP Chemistry and have no experience with the PA Homeschoolers or Scholars Online programming. I see a thread here where there are very good reviews for ChemAdvantage, but could not find feedback for the Scholars online program and are interested in how they compare. We are looking for a rigorous AP Chem course online with student/teacher interaction. We currently use AOPS for math- completed Algebra A,B & Intro Geometry, have liked their teachers, rigor, format of classes, assignments and feedback. We used Thinkwell for math in the past and the learning format of videos did not provided for interaction/adequate engagement. They would breeze through, complete all the work-do very well and not delve deep nor be challenged.

    We are hoping there are those who can provide feedback on the Scholars Online AP Chem course and if any can point out how this course compares with the ChemAdvantage AP course, teacher, rigor, learning experience, feedback, online format & assignments to help with our decision. Thank you, Butterflyhome


 

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Connie, Thank you for this thread.  Have you looked at the following chemistry texts, Kotz and for labs Thompson? How would they do for an honors  or AP level course? And can you provide feedback on how they compare to Chang's text. Thank you. Alisa

 

Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity - Hybrid/Soft Cover (Edition: 9)

James C. Kotz, Paul M. Treichel, John R. Townsend, David A. Treichel

ISBN: 128546253X .

 This paperback version of the text is a hybrid version, with some parts online.

            Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments (Edition: 1)

Robert Bruce Thompson

ISBN: 0596514921 .

            Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity - Hardcover (Edition: 9)

John C. Kotz, Paul M. GTreichel, John Townsend, David Treichel

ISBN: 1133949649 .

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Has anyone used the CK-12 textbook?  I read mixed reviews on it and was wondering what kind of experiences people had had with it.  

 

I am researching CK-12 for chemistry now.  The "second edition "textbook linked in the OP is not found with a search at the CK-12 site, though the link for the textbook and teacher's edition still work.  The link for the labs does not work. 

 

Instead, at this chemistry page, they have 3 textbooks available on the FlexBook Textbooks tab, CK-12 Chemistry Basic, CK-12 Chemistry Intermediate, and CK-12 Chemistry Concepts Intermediate, as well as a text titled From Vitamins to Baked Goods:  Real Applications of Organic Chemistry.

 

Only the CK-12 Chemistry Intermediate has a teacher's edition, quizzes and tests, and workbook available.  Someone has added answers to the in-text questions/problems for CK-12 Chemistry Basic, however, on the Resources tab.

 

The books are all written with some of the same authors, so the content follows a similar sequence.  Just 30 min. of browsing makes me think there is considerable difference between the 3 texts.  That's as far as I've progressed so far... 

 

There is also CBSE Chemistry 12, which is still in progress and asking for contributors.  ?  I don't know what CBSE is. 

 

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*From "HodgesSchool":

Just ran across these demonstration labs from MIT that are well produced, showy, and also quite seriously academic:

(And if you haven't seen the Chem Lab Boot Camp that I've mentioned before, you might enjoy it, too.  It is much more narrative than scientific, but I found it both inspiring and reassuring.  http://ocw.mit.edu/h...-lab-boot-camp/ )

 

 

The MIT Opencourseware links above no longer work.

 

 

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There is also CBSE Chemistry 12, which is still in progress and asking for contributors. ? I don't know what CBSE is.

CBSE is Central Board of School Education.It's one of the popular(and fairly rigorous) Boards of Education in India.

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sadly, it seems Tang's website is down.  Any other suggestions for resources for Chang's General Chem?

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We are doing MOOCs for chemistry this year.  We started with an easy, 4-week long course at Open2Study called Chemistry:  Building Blocks of the World.  This course would be appropriate for a student in middle school, methinks, or, as in our case, a high school student who didn't have the benefit of a lot of science in earlier years.  It is an enjoyable overview that focuses on the basics without getting bogged down in detail or math problems. 

 

Then we moved on to Coursera's Introduction to Chemistry:  Reactions and Ratios.  We are 3-4 weeks into this 7-week long course, and it's getting tough.  It is interesting and well-done, with an enthusiastic Assistant Professor from Duke University, Dorian Canelas.  The in-lecture interactive questions help us practice what we are learning as we go, and the quizzes at the end of each week's unit seem to be a good assessment of the material covered.  One unit per week is too much for us at this point, so we are re-enrolling in another session to give ourselves more time to cover.  This seems like a comprehensive chemistry course for high school.   

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Chemistry has not gone well so far this year.

We're using Chang's General Chem.  DS & DD both are finding it insufficient to learn from and there isn't enough time for me to act as full-time teacher.  The solutions manual isn't sufficient if they didn't understand the concepts from the book.  There's a "Learnsmart" app available from the publisher, but that hasn't been much help either (and, it's super frustrating...it seems to not record what they've done sometimes, leading to frustration when you come back the next day to find that you haven't made any progress).

 

SO - I think we need a class.

 

Thoughts on Thinkwell?  There's some recently posted commentary by EndOfOrdinary suggesting it was too easy and conceptual.  OTOH, it's described by the OP and others in this thread as being AP-level.   Not sure how to reconcile those.  Anyone share experience actually using it?

 

The "Dr Tang" website is back - and there are some great looking videos of him explaining the content...but it's at an AP level and I think that's really too much at this point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EndOfOrdinary

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Hi all. :)  I wanted to apologize for not keeping on top of the pinned threads as well as I had meant to.  I know some folks were asking questions here and I didn't get around to answering them - my apologies.

 

I also see that there are a number of broken links - my apologies there, too.  I don't know how much time I'll have to go back and fix things in the original posts but I'm glad that people are pointing them out - it's certainly helpful for others.

 

I've also been seriously pondering the idea of developing some homeschool high school chemistry courses and/or an integrated "Science for Everyday Life" type of course.  I'm envisioning something along the lines of Derek Owens-type course delivery with video lectures.  I think I might start a new thread for this subject to see what sorts of things people would be looking for in those types of courses.

 

Thanks again to all the folks who continue to contribute to these threads! :)

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Dicentra,

 

We would definitely be interested. My son needs asynchronous due to his heavy travel schedule with extracurricular activities. Derek Owens-type videos,  and with fill-in notes like he offers, would be a winner for us! We look forward to hearing more!

 

Thank you! :hurray:

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Hi all. :)  I wanted to apologize for not keeping on top of the pinned threads as well as I had meant to.  I know some folks were asking questions here and I didn't get around to answering them - my apologies.

 

I also see that there are a number of broken links - my apologies there, too.  I don't know how much time I'll have to go back and fix things in the original posts but I'm glad that people are pointing them out - it's certainly helpful for others.

 

I've also been seriously pondering the idea of developing some homeschool high school chemistry courses and/or an integrated "Science for Everyday Life" type of course.  I'm envisioning something along the lines of Derek Owens-type course delivery with video lectures.  I think I might start a new thread for this subject to see what sorts of things people would be looking for in those types of courses.

 

Thanks again to all the folks who continue to contribute to these threads! :)

 

Since my son absolutely loves the Derek Owens courses, I think it would be a big hit here!  The video, fill-in notes, practice problem set up is a great set-up for him. It's just the right amount of instruction and support.  So, if you did something like it, I would be a fan.

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I haven't seen this mentioned on the boards yet - Dr Jay Wile (wrote the original Apologia science series), is now teaching an online Honors Chemistry course for the first time in the 2017-2018 school year.  He is also offering biology and physics courses.

 

Dr Jay Wile online highschool science classes

 

The chemistry text is his newish chemistry book Discovering Design with Chemistry

 

 

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Useful topic. When I was at university, I had one semester of chemistry. Since I had an engineering specialty, chemistry was like a general course, more time was given to other courses. Therefore, at the end of the semester, I accumulated laboratory work and decided to study with a tutor. At https://assignment.essayshark.com/chemistry-help.html I found a tutor who helped me prepare for the exam and gave me many useful links and articles on organic chemistry.

Edited by brainstormy

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I've also been seriously pondering the idea of developing some homeschool high school chemistry courses and/or an integrated "Science for Everyday Life" type of course.  I'm envisioning something along the lines of Derek Owens-type course delivery with video lectures.  I think I might start a new thread for this subject to see what sorts of things people would be looking for in those types of courses.

 

 

 

Is this something you are still considering?  What time frame?

 

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Is this something you are still considering?  What time frame?

 

 

Hi Tammi,

 

I'm working on it! :)  My start-up date is tentatively Fall 2018.  I just had major surgery 2 weeks ago so I've been down and out for a bit but I'm starting to feel more human now :D so I'll be back at course development soon. :)

 

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Hi Tammi,

 

I'm working on it! :)  My start-up date is tentatively Fall 2018.  I just had major surgery 2 weeks ago so I've been down and out for a bit but I'm starting to feel more human now :D so I'll be back at course development soon. :)

 

 

Well, darn, that will be too late for our use. However, I'm excited to see you are still developing it. It will be a great addition to have that type of platform. My own son won't be able to use it, but I plan to teach science workshops for bio and chem labs so I'll still be following and looking forward to it!

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Hi Tammi,

 

I'm working on it! :)  My start-up date is tentatively Fall 2018.  I just had major surgery 2 weeks ago so I've been down and out for a bit but I'm starting to feel more human now :D so I'll be back at course development soon. :)

 

 

If you have a list of people that you're keeping updated on the progress could you please put me on it? If not, could you send a link to the new thread that you talked about starting concerning it???

 

Thanks!

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I didn't see my chemistry program listed, so I'm chiming in. ;-)

Forgive me if I missed it!

 

chem-banner.jpg

 

http://www.guesthollow.com/homeschool/science/chemistry_highschool/chemistry_home.html

 

Gourmet Lab: The Scientific Principles Behind Your Favorite Foods

jenn&charles, have you seen this book before? I bought it and had hoped to put together something that looks like what you've managed to compile and never could/did do it. Thanks for sharing the link!

 

 

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If you have a list of people that you're keeping updated on the progress could you please put me on it? If not, could you send a link to the new thread that you talked about starting concerning it???

 

Thanks!

 

I haven't started keeping a list yet but here's the link to the other thread:

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/636364-thinking-again-about-developing-an-online-high-school-chem-course-for-homeschoolers/

 

Hope that helps!

 

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Gourmet Lab: The Scientific Principles Behind Your Favorite Foods

jenn&charles, have you seen this book before? I bought it and had hoped to put together something that looks like what you've managed to compile and never could/did do it. Thanks for sharing the link!

 

 

Oooh, no, I haven't seen that....checking it out now. Thank you so much for the recommendation!

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Oooh, no, I haven't seen that....checking it out now. Thank you so much for the recommendation!

 

You're welcome. I've also recently come across Novare science which I like because the philosophy is to focus more on depth rather than breadth. It can be a bit dry, but I'd love to be able to use their textbook content and throw in kitchen labs. I'm just not quite sure how to do that.

 

I've not used their chemistry yet, but have been happy with their physical science, earth science and physics texts.

 

Like I said, I like the less is more philosophy, but I'd like to be able to apply the concepts to the kitchen.

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Well... :)  Here it is - my website for my new online homeschool high school chemistry venture:

 

http://www.clovervalleychemistry.com/

 

Everyone is welcome to take a look around and then contact me with any questions or comments you may have.  I've tried to include as much info as I could without making things overwhelming - hopefully. :)  I've added entries for the courses in each of the appropriate posts at the beginning of this thread.

 

If anyone sees any spelling or grammar errors or finds mistakes or broken links, I'd be much obliged if you'd let me know.  I've looked at the website for so long I'm not sure I'm seeing what's actually there anymore. :D

 

I'm VERY excited to start these courses next fall!  Teaching chemistry is my passion and I'm so happy that I get to share that passion with the homeschooling community. :)

 

(And yes - the name is very similar to our own Morning Glory's Clover Creek Physics. :)  The area I live in has long been informally known as "Clover Valley" and I've always thought I'd like to incorporate that into the name of any business I started.  Before I started to settle on anything, I asked Morning Glory if she was ok with the names being so similar and she was so kind and said she thought it was a great name. :)  I figure that folks who are looking for online physics or chem for homeschoolers will just think "It's Clover... something" :) and Morning Glory and I can redirect to the other person's website if need be. :) )

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Copied from one of the OPs original posts in this thread:

 

Name: Fascinating Chemistry
Publisher: Fascinating Education
Where to buy:
http://fascinatinged...bership_signup/
Level: Basic Reg Chem
Type: Online provider
Additional Materials: N/A
Teacher Resources: N/A
Lesson Plans: N/A
Secular/Christian: Secular
Program includes labs: No
Lab kit available: No
Math background needed: Basic Algebra

 

 

 

I wanted to share with you all that this program has really helped my dyslexic, Aspie daughter. She has struggled, and I mean struggled with algebra and chemistry. Not too long after I started her on this curriculum, dh and I also agreed to give her a break from algebra and move to a different math so as not to get discouraged. Yes, Basic Algebra is really helpful with chemistry but don't let not having mastered it keep your student from trying this program. 

 

I will tell you that on every single test she scores right around 50% or so. I'm pretty sure that's because she doesn't pay 100% attention during each video lesson. Plus, the test is a read the question multiple choice test and that can be difficult for the dyslexic. But I know she is absolutely comprehending the material because when I have her go back and correct the questions she missed, she always gets them right. I give her half credit for each correction she gets right, which usually brings her up to a passing grade. So I don't tell you all this to discourage anyone but to show you that some kids might need a little extra help. But this is the farthest she's come in a chemistry curriculum and she's almost done!  :hurray: 

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(X-posted on my threads about my online courses)

 

Update :)

 

Things are moving right along and I'm on track for a Fall 2018 launch.  I've had quite a few people use the contact form on my website to ask questions or to make a request to be placed on my registration reminder email list.  Thank you so much for your interest!  I wanted to keep people informed about some updates that I've made:

 

1.  I took into account the suggestions that people gave for the schedule for the year and made a few changes.  You can find the updated (but still tentative) schedule here on the Registration and Pricing page.

 

2.  The opening of registration was set for March 1, 2018 at 12:01am Central Standard Time but I decided to change it to March 1, 2018 at 12:01am EASTERN Standard Time.  I realized that my original time would be one o'clock in the morning for those on the east coast and I thought that was kind of mean of me. :)  Midnight on the east coast is slightly better - I suppose. :D

 

3.  I've now completed the video lectures for the first chapter of each of the courses on offer.  I've uploaded them all to ScreenCast and I've placed links to the video playlists on each of the course pages on my website.  Everyone is welcome to head on over and take a look.  I think it will be especially helpful for those who are still undecided as to whether to go with Regular Chemistry or Honors Chemistry.  You'll be able to get an idea from the video lectures for Chapter 1 from each course what the difference in pacing and depth for each course would be.  They should also be helpful to show to your students to see if they like my teaching style before you register. :)

 

As always, I welcome feedback and/or any questions anyone has.  I'm getting very excited about registration and building up content for the fall! :)

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I have been teaching chemistry this year in a co-op which only meets every other week. I chose Dr. Jay Wile's newest chemistry book, Discovering Design with Chemistry. I wanted to give a review for those considering it. I didn't see it listed in the chemistry courses at the beginning of the thread. 

 

http://www.bereanbuilders.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=ECC_

 

I chose this text for a few reasons. I used his previous book when I was teaching a class to my daughter and some other students. I had not studied chemistry since high school, and I found that text to be very easy to understand. It was the only chemistry she took in high school, and she went on to have a 97 average in her Chemistry for Nursing course in college. I knew that the experiments would be easy to implement without a lot of very expensive equipment, and I knew that it was written to the student. Most of my students are self-teaching, so I needed something student friendly. 

 

This edition has proven to hold the same qualities I found helpful in his previous book. It is very easy to understand, and the examples are very helpful in understanding concepts and how to do problems.

 

The experiments have gone very well, and I feel the students are learning great things about precision, measurement, and calculations in a lab setting. The students come in with few questions, despite working on their own throughout the chapters. I set up an Edmodo site so that they could ask questions from home, and few have needed to utilize it. I only have one student who has struggled a bit, but she is actually just taking Algebra 1 right now. Somehow her mother didn't realize that Algebra 1 is a requirement. 

 

When you purchase the book (try to purchase the 2nd printing because the 1st printing had quite a few errors), you are given access to resources on the website. There are links to numerous videos over concepts as well as additional practice problems and solutions for each chapter. 

 

It's been a great year for our group, and I know this text has helped make it so. 

 

Edited by mom31257
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I have been teaching chemistry this year in a co-op which only meets every other week. I chose Dr. Jay Wile's newest chemistry book, Discovering Design with Chemistry. I wanted to give a review for those considering it. I didn't see it listed in the chemistry courses at the beginning of the thread. 

 

http://www.bereanbuilders.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=ECC_

 

I chose this text for a few reasons. I used his previous book when I was teaching a class to my daughter and some other students. I had not studied chemistry since high school, and I found that text to be very easy to understand. It was the only chemistry she took in high school, and she went on to have a 97 average in her Chemistry for Nursing course in college. I knew that the experiments would be easy to implement without a lot of very expensive equipment, and I knew that it was written to the student. Most of my students are self-teaching, so I needed something student friendly. 

 

This edition has proven to hold the same qualities I found helpful in his previous book. It is very easy to understand, and the examples are very helpful in understanding concepts and how to do problems.

 

The experiments have gone very well, and I feel the students are learning great things about precision, measurement, and calculations in a lab setting. The students come in with few questions, despite working on their own throughout the chapters. I set up an Edmodo site so that they could ask questions from home, and few have needed to utilize it. I only have one student who has struggled a bit, but she is actually just taking Algebra 1 right now. Somehow her mother didn't realize that Algebra 1 is a requirement. 

 

When you purchase the book (try to purchase the 2nd printing because the 1st printing had quite a few errors), you are given access to resources on the website. There are links to numerous videos over concepts as well as additional practice problems and solutions for each chapter. 

 

It's been a great year for our group, and I know this text has helped make it so. 

Thanks for the review. I am looking into getting a copy in the not too distant future. Good to know that it is worth it to get the 2nd edition.  ; )

 

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