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Cooking on one of those funny glass-topped stoves--help me


Harriet Vane
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My in-laws, with whom I cherish a great relationship, have one of those glass-topped stove tops. When you turn on a burner, it glows red.

 

The other night I was cooking pasta, and my in-laws were sooooooo distressed at the pot boiling over. The lid was on, and the water boiled over. I took the lid off immediately (I was standing right there) and turned down the heat and considered it taken care of. It all happened in a matter of seconds--I doubt it was boiling over for as long as a minute. My in-laws, however, were kind of frantic about it. After it happened they were tsking and watching the cooking with an eagle eye and giving all kinds of helpful hints. We didn't argue about it--I just apologized and kept on cooking. Later, when dinner was all done I wiped the stove with a cloth and it looked the same as always.

 

I must admit, though, that I am baffled. It didn't seem like a big deal to me, but they were really unhappy about this. Of course I don't want my cooking to boil over. I am a good cook (if I do say so myself), and boiling-over pots are not a usual event in my kitchen.

 

Is there something special about glass-topped stoves that makes this particularly heinous?

 

While I am at it, let me also ask about another occasion. The stove was hot. I knew it was hot. I gave it a few quick swipes with a wet cloth so that some drips would not harden (maybe it was a dry cloth? I don't remember), and my mil nearly had a heart attack. She scolded me about the risk of the rag catching on fire. She kept bringing it up, too. The thing is, it's not a gas stove. There is no open flame. I have a hard time believing that a rag would catch on fire from swiping it quickly over the red burner circle. Or would it?

 

I do cook at their house at times, and want to know if I need to take better care of the stove top, or should I be patient and soothing when they over-react to stove issues??

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I just got rid of mine---hated it!! I now have an older one with the coils-- not as good as gas but much better than the glass ones.

Everything boils over. Other than the mess, I don't know of an issue with the glass getting food on it. The only thing you cannot do is put the hot lid on the glass, it will crack. -- Something about the suction of the steamy top with the glass.

 

Lara

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Well I came from a gas stove to a ceramic top (not my choice!) and I have wiped it many times with a rag, damp or dry.

I find, as long as I wipe any spills off right away nothing happens but things can burn on just like any other stove.

I am not the first user of our stove and things have burnt into it permanently but I would expect this from any cooktop.

 

Perhaps your in-laws are just super careful or worried about this stove.

I think you did the right thing in wiping it up and since you saw no difference afterwards you could not have harmed anything.

There is a special cleanser for ceramic tops, maybe your mother-in-law would rather use it instead of just a rag?

 

Either way, sounds to me like they are super worried about this cooktop, possibly because it's different from coils or gas?

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I really like our smooth top stove! Sure, boil-overs happen (just like w my old coil stove----which I hated cleaning) but we just wipe it up right when it happens. Once a week I use the cleanser for the surface to get any splatters or whatever.

 

I do know that if you have a sugary boil-over, like when making candy or jam, the hot mixture will pit the surface. Perhaps your inlaws heard that but now believe any boil-over will do the same???

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I have had them in two houses, including our current one. Your in laws a being a mite picky. I boiled over food last night. The cleaner they recommend for them is nice to have, although I use. Soft scrub with bleach sometimes.

 

I prefer gas to cook with, but glass top electric is my preference over other electric.

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I've had three over the past 12 years (three different houses). It was scary at first, but they are no big deal to keep clean at all. It took me a while to get comfortable with the stove, maybe up to a year. I am a good and frequent cook who always manages to boil over water for pasta.

 

Burned on food is not a big deal. Starch from pasta or potato spills can be a little difficult if it bakes on to the top. I am a neat freak, and my dh even more so. If a regular washrag doesn't work, I usually get any food/spills up with a nylon scrubby. Sometimes I'll use a little dishsoap on the scrubby, scrub, and let it sit for a few minutes to soften any spills. A few times a year, it might be necessary to use a ceramic cooktop cleaner. I could probably use SoftScrub, but it makes me too nervous (what if it isn't soft enough and scratches?).

 

A friend uses a razor blade to get up burned on food. (I'd be too scared I'd scratch it!)

 

Like you, I will sometimes use a damp cloth, either when the burner is off but still warm, or if I have a spill, in an effort to keep a spill from baking on. If it's hot enough, and the rag were dry, I suppose it could be a fire hazard. But that's just not ever been the case!

 

Getting food off is never an issue. I am far more worried about scratching the cooktop, but I don't think that's ever happened either, even with two kids who use the stove.

 

Can you look up the owner's manual online, and printout pertinent information about caring for it? Would that help ease their mind, or would they think this strange?

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I loathe my glass top stove.

 

Loathe is not strong enough, actually.

 

My pots don't fit the burners exactly, and the largest burner is permanently marked because of it.

 

I can't wait to trade it in for something else.

 

But it does seem like your inlaws are a little overcareful--but then, if I had been, I wouldn't have ended up with a horrible-looking stove top.

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I love my glass top stove. And your in-laws are just being silly. :)

 

 

This. I've had mine for years and like it. I also clean houses and prefer glass tops to the nooks and crannies of traditional stoves. Magic Erasers clean them up just fine.

Maybe they are worried about the top cracking? It's a lot harder to crack those things than just letting water boil over.

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I have had a glass top for the past4.5 years and I love it! I have heard from DD (Also owns a glass top stove) that pasta water can be the one thing that burns onto a glass top that you can't remove. It hasn't happened to me. In the future you can pull the pot off the burner or at least halfway off when you see it may boil over. The burners do cool down fairly quickly, but removing the pot is faster.

 

I did start a towel on fire one time. Not sure how it happend, and I was not wiping down the burner at the time. I think I moved something on the counter and pushed the towel into the stove. I got it to the sink, wet it down and threw it in the trash. Hubby found it smoldering in there later. Oy vey. . I don't think it would start on fire with just a swipe. However recently I wiped up a spill with a microfiber dish cloth when the burner was still hot. I melted the dishcloth on the burner. Double Oy vey. That one took several treatments with my trusty Bar Keepers Friend to remove.

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Mine came with our house. I used to loathe it. Now I am indifferent to it. It is scratched and marked and I really just don't care. It still cooks well. When it goes I doubt I would get another one.

 

I think your in-laws are being a bit over-protective but I was the same way in the beginning.

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I have one that I got used. I like it better than my old coil top (with millions of nooks and crannies and it always looked filthy, I would end up buying new drip pans for it at least once per year). But I don't love it. The double burner in back is touchy between the two burners, so it's easy to think you are turning the large burner to low and end up turning the small one to high. Ugh. And the largest burner doesn't really fit my stock pot properly (and I make a lot of stock). I haven't found the surface to be touchy, though. I swipe at while hot. I use cast iron pots and pans on it, I even slide them around on it sometimes. It seems fine. Of course, it's not like I care all that much, either. I got it used and I tend to use my ranges hard (sort of like the difference between people who drive Cadillac pickups with clean, carpeted interiors and pearly paint jobs and people who drive old F150s with rust, mud, and beer cans in the back). Eventually, I'll get a gas range, that's what I'd prefer.

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Glass tops don't particularly boil over more often than regular. Clean up is pretty simple, but don't do it when the top is hot with a cool rag. The temp change can crack the top. I swab up what I can with a dry towel and after the stove is cool I use the stove top cleaner to scrub it.

 

 

This. I just leave spills until the stove cools off and then clean it.

 

Boiling over is not a big deal. It's actually easier to clean than the coil stoves!

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I have had them in two houses, including our current one. Your in laws a being a mite picky. I boiled over food last night. The cleaner they recommend for them is nice to have, although I use. Soft scrub with bleach sometimes.

 

I prefer gas to cook with, but glass top electric is my preference over other electric.

 

 

I have a smooth top in 3 houses spanning 10 years. I use my cast iron on it....I lift to move skillets, I avoid scooting things across the surface....and I never put cold water on the hot surface because it could crack the top....I also generally just wipe it down with a soapy cloth. If I spilled something and it burned I just get my razor blade scrapper out and spend 2 minutes getting anything off that is built up.

 

To the person who said they spent hours scrapping with a razor blade....?. How? I just don't see how that would be possible and I am NOT a neat cook.

 

To the OP I think your in laws are just being super picky and worrying over much.

 

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We bought my Mom a glass stove top.

 

She boils things over often. Sets hot or cold things on it. The only thing you should not do is set a plastic spatula on the glass top when it's hot. Mind you the house keeper took care of that. - but it had her working.

 

I haven't taken a close look at it. But last I remember it is perfectly fine, no scratches, dents, foggy patches... anything. She is rough on it.

 

 

My ds set a plastic bowl on mine.

 

He was horrified but it came right off with a razor blade.

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I think people who use gas just aren't used to electric, I think they just heat up a lot faster. My mom has trouble when she visits, but our stove is not gas and that's how it is.

 

I'm pretty hard on our glass cooktop but I've never stressed over anything spilling on it. Worst case, pour some soapy water on it when it's cooled off, let it soak, and easily wipe away.

 

I've tried wiping stuff off while I'm cooking. I'm not concerned about causing a fire, but usually stuff just smears and I'm more concerned with burning my fingers, so I've learned to just leave it until I'm done cooking. Then, see above...soak and wipe.

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Weird. I have one and I like it just fine. I put it in on purpose! :laugh: The only thing I can see with boiling over is that after the stove cools, you need to clean that gook off 100% or it will burn on permanently. My rice sometimes boils over a little and, though I don't freak out, I do feel like...*sigh* now I have to clean that off with care. I use ceramic stove-top cleaner. It takes a little effort if things are burned on, but it's not a catastrophe.

 

It can also crack if you put a hot lid on it, so you won't want to do that. It can also crack if you knock a leaded crystal vase over on it. Ask me how I know. :leaving:

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Allow me to introduce you to one of my best friends: Cerama bryte. If my pots boil over, I just let it cool, then scrub the surface with cerama bryte. We have had this stove/oven for almost 11 years, and I only have one tiny stain (dratted tomatoes!) It's also great for cleaning stainless sinks, pots and pans, and getting the residue off of car windows from registration and inspection decals.

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Allow me to introduce you to one of my best friends: Cerama bryte. If my pots boil over, I just let it cool, then scrub the surface with cerama bryte. We have had this stove/oven for almost 11 years, and I only have one tiny stain (dratted tomatoes!) It's also great for cleaning stainless sinks, pots and pans, and getting the residue off of car windows from registration and inspection decals.

 

 

Bar Keepers friend is a similiar product, but cheaper. I have found it at my local dollar store for 1.00 for 13 oz bottlehttp://www.webstaurantstore.com/bar-keepers-friend-13-oz-all-purpose-liquid-cleanser/26211600.html. They closed down, and I am still looking for my new source. I had found it for 3.00 per 28oz at Lowe's, but haven't been back there to look again.

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Bar Keepers friend is a similiar product, but cheaper. I have found it at my local dollar store for 1.00 for 13 oz bottlehttp://www.webstaura...r/26211600.html. They closed down, and I am still looking for my new source. I had found it for 3.00 per 28oz at Lowe's, but haven't been back there to look again.

 

 

I'll be sure to keep a lookout for this one! A penny saved is a penny earned, right?

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Bar Keepers friend is a similiar product, but cheaper. I have found it at my local dollar store for 1.00 for 13 oz bottlehttp://www.webstaura...r/26211600.html. They closed down, and I am still looking for my new source. I had found it for 3.00 per 28oz at Lowe's, but haven't been back there to look again.

 

 

Our Walmart carries it, as well as Bon Ami, which is a similar, but all-natural product.

 

I use BKF and Bon Ami on my stainless steel pots. I've always been afraid they'd scratch my glass-top stove.

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Our Walmart carries it, as well as Bon Ami, which is a similar, but all-natural product.

 

I use BKF and Bon Ami on my stainless steel pots. I've always been afraid they'd scratch my glass-top stove.

 

 

 

I use the liquid as the powder scares me too. Too many years of using Comet.

I will check Walmart if I can't find it anywhere else.

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Allow me to introduce you to one of my best friends: Cerama bryte. If my pots boil over, I just let it cool, then scrub the surface with cerama bryte. We have had this stove/oven for almost 11 years, and I only have one tiny stain (dratted tomatoes!) It's also great for cleaning stainless sinks, pots and pans, and getting the residue off of car windows from registration and inspection decals.

 

 

Yeah...the appliance store gave us the first bottle of this.

 

It cleans everything off in less than a minute.

 

Scraping for hours with a razor blade sounds like torture. I can't imagine doing that when cerama bryte works so well.

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I have a glass top stove and have had some horrendous spill overs. Pasta water, cream sauces, whole vats of cooking jam, you name it. I clean off as much as I can and let it cool. Then I soak a towel in hot soapy water and cover the cook top with baking soda and cover it with the towel. I let it soak for 15 minutes or so then scrub it down really well. I often need to use a razor blade to get up some of the super stubborn gunk. I'm really rough on my cook top and don't have any pits or scratches. They're very durable.

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  • 1 year later...

It's a mess if something boils over and you can't clean it up right away. You do need to wait a bit for the glass top to cool down of course. I spent my share of time scraping off gunk from spills. The wet towel thing is a great idea! Wish I'd thought of that.

 

Count me as one who loves her gas stove! Glass cook tops were supposed to be wonderful because of the easy clean up, but I wouldn't buy one again. I imagine your parents were just being a bit over-protective.

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Nothing will fuse to your stove unless one or the other substance actually melted. Your stove does not have enough heat to melt itself, nor do pots, pans, or kettles melt when they are heated up and used in ordinary ways.

 

However, continually not removing it might (maybe, eventually) discolour a kettle sized ring, unless the kettle and the burner are exactly the same size.

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I have had a glass top stove for 20 years and love them.  We even had one in the cabin.  They are so much easier to clean and large pans don't wobble on it.

 

They are being wayyyy over protective.  I have boiled over so many pots over the years, I can't even begin to count.  Not because I am a bad cook but because I really don't care as much with the glass top.  I usually wait for the burner to be turned off for a bit to wipe it down, but not always.  Never use a microfiber on a hot stove though, they will melt..  If you let a cloth sit on the burner long enough, it will catch on fire so you do need to be smart about it.  But I don't think twice of running a wet cloth over it when hot at all.

 

Mine both came with a razor blade cleaner, so those are very safe to use on them.  I also use a cook top cleaner periodically called cerama bryte.  It is my favorite of all the ones out there. 

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Those glass topped stoves are a giant pain to clean. To to point of never being the same again and looking dirty all the time. Ask me how I know...

I have had smooth top for about ten years and find it soooooo easy to keep clean. I use a razor blade on tough stuff but mine looks great all of the time.

 

I think if you didn't clean it before cooking again on it it might be a problem.

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Maybe I'm just an incredibly messy cook, but I do think they're a PITA to keep clean. Every drip burns onto the stove and eventually has to be scraped away with a razor blade. I've used the various special cleaners, but ultimately it always comes down to lots of elbow grease and scraping. 

I do wonder if color makes a difference. Our stove is glossy black, and even boiled over water leaves a cooked-on white film. Are the lighter colored stoves easier to keep clean, maybe? 

That said, if I'm going to be stuck with an electric stove, I'll happily keep my glass topped stove over one with electric coils and drip pans. There's nothing worse than a wobbly, uneven, won't-sit-level electric coil burner when trying to cook! 

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Maybe I'm just an incredibly messy cook, but I do think they're a PITA to keep clean. Every drip burns onto the stove and eventually has to be scraped away with a razor blade. I've used the various special cleaners, but ultimately it always comes down to lots of elbow grease and scraping.

 

I do wonder if color makes a difference. Our stove is glossy black, and even boiled over water leaves a cooked-on white film. Are the lighter colored stoves easier to keep clean, maybe?

 

That said, if I'm going to be stuck with an electric stove, I'll happily keep my glass topped stove over one with electric coils and drip pans. There's nothing worse than a wobbly, uneven, won't-sit-level electric coil burner when trying to cook!

I use a razor ever time. Takes 30 seconds.

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I boil stuff over all the time and don't find our gass topped stove hard to clean.

 

I'm very rough with mine. I scrape the pan against the glass when sauteing, for example. Stuff boils over all the time.

 

I just scrub (NOT gently) with a brillo pad or a copper pad, and it shines like new every time.

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I have a glass-topped stove.  I don't like it, but it is better than the electric coils.  When we needed to replace the cooktop, I chose the glass.  (In my dream life, I have gas cooking and baking!)  We have plenty of permanent stains that do not come off even with specialized cleaners.  When we sell the house someday, probably some buyer will be offended.  In my defense, I have a stove for serious-level cooking, not for looking pretty.   

 

I suppose that something could catch fire.  In practice, though, I even do a quick mop up (with the burners on) with paper towels, rather than leave a spill to harden.  I would not scrape with a blade, though, or use a metal pad.  Harshest scrubbing tool that I will use is one of those funny scrubbers made from nutshells; they work well.

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Maybe I'm just an incredibly messy cook, but I do think they're a PITA to keep clean. Every drip burns onto the stove and eventually has to be scraped away with a razor blade. I've used the various special cleaners, but ultimately it always comes down to lots of elbow grease and scraping. 

 

I do wonder if color makes a difference. Our stove is glossy black, and even boiled over water leaves a cooked-on white film. Are the lighter colored stoves easier to keep clean, maybe? 

 

That said, if I'm going to be stuck with an electric stove, I'll happily keep my glass topped stove over one with electric coils and drip pans. There's nothing worse than a wobbly, uneven, won't-sit-level electric coil burner when trying to cook! 

The only one I have seen that was hard to get clean was a glossy black GE brand one and it was a PITA. I am sure there are others, but it was the only one I have tried to clean myself.  

 

Mine have both been Whirlpools  with a dark grey, granite looking surface, My current one has had 13 years of use with both enameled and raw cast iron, hard anodized and stainless steel.  I could easily polish it to looking good in 1 minute and brand new looking in less than 5 minutes. And, I am a Very visual person.  I have never babied my appliances.  

 

I have seen two glass top's electronics get fried (electricity shooting across it under the glass), but never damage from spills or pans..  

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I have seen two glass top's electronics get fried (electricity shooting across it under the glass), but never damage from spills or pans..

Yeah, a boil over killed the electronics on my last stove. It wasn't the first boil over -- it had survived a few others just fine -- but then never recovered from the last one. Supposedly they are more protected now than when I bought that stove, but I still rush to get to boil overs quickly!

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Yeah, a boil over killed the electronics on my last stove. It wasn't the first boil over -- it had survived a few others just fine -- but then never recovered from the last one. Supposedly they are more protected now than when I bought that stove, but I still rush to get to boil overs quickly!

Both of the stoves were in use for about a month before they died.  I turned on a burner and they fried.  Nothing even on the stove at the time.  I have VERY odd luck with electronics though, so it isn't surprising.  LOL

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The pain about boiling over is that the glass is a nuisance to clean. It is actually easy IF you use a straight blade razor/knife (the kind you clean paint off glass windows with) to scrape the shmutz off first, and then use the special "glass top stove cleaner" (sort of a special soft scrub) to clean after that. The whole process will take 3-5 minutes if you have those exact tools. But, if you don't have them, then cleaning is a nightmare. Maybe your inlaws don't have the right tools. If they don't, spend $10, and get them the tools, and they will be grateful forever. :)

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